#1
Im not sure how to explain this, but when I record my guitar through my amp its sounds very weak in comparison to the other instruments I use plugins through logic with (bass, drums etc),
is there something I'm missing?
Thanks
#5
I'd double track rhythm guitars as standard - as said, record it twice (NOT copy and paste just one recording) and pan them left and right. After that, EQ can help, as can the bass guitar under it. Half of the guitar sound seems to come from working with the bass guitar
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#6
If you want HUGE tracks, track four separate guitar tracks with two on each side.
Get your tone perfect, record it, drop in a high pass filter to around 70Hz and leave the bass do the low frequency work, it'll sound weaker on its on but as long as the bass is at the right level it'll beef everything up.
#8
i like your tone. i think if you do a second take and pan that to the right, you'll probably get a pretty good sound already.
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#9
Quote by HeretiK538
I'd double track rhythm guitars as standard - as said, record it twice (NOT copy and paste just one recording) and pan them left and right. After that, EQ can help, as can the bass guitar under it. Half of the guitar sound seems to come from working with the bass guitar

Yeah, don't copy and paste. That'll just do the same thing you have now. If you want to be cheap, you can add a stereo delay to offset one channel by about 20ms, but it'll sound better with two takes.
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If you want HUGE tracks, track four separate guitar tracks with two on each side.
Get your tone perfect, record it, drop in a high pass filter to around 70Hz and leave the bass do the low frequency work, it'll sound weaker on its on but as long as the bass is at the right level it'll beef everything up.

In practice, two will be enough, especially compared to just having one. And you don't pan two takes by the same amount; for the fullest sound, try about +-80% and +-60%.
70Hz is lower than usual. I usually set the low cut to 100Hz or more. But this brings up an important point: Experiment with any numbers we give you. Mixing is 99% trial and error. That's why we tell you not to use Audacity.

But for now, just double-track it, pan the different takes, and see how it sounds. It's really that easy.
Last edited by Cavalcade at Aug 25, 2013,
#11
Bass guitar.

If you don't have a bass guitar, add a bass guitar.

Bass guitar is more important to the size of a guitar part than the guitar itself is.

Bass guitar.


More bass guitar.


More of it, not less, more.


More bass guitar.
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#12
Quote by Cavalcade
And you don't pan two takes by the same amount; for the fullest sound, try about +-80% and +-60%.

Don't pan them the same amount, so they're slightly to one side?

I've always made sure to keep my guitars balanced - even when I've got multiple rhythm parts, I'll pan one pair at +-30% or so, and one at +-80%. The only things I put to one side or another are lead guitar parts, which are always off-center around +-5-20%, or occasionally vocals, though again, I 'balance' them if I'm double-tracking them. What does offsetting them to one side do? (besides the obvious )
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#13
Quote by HeretiK538
Don't pan them the same amount, so they're slightly to one side?

I've always made sure to keep my guitars balanced - even when I've got multiple rhythm parts, I'll pan one pair at +-30% or so, and one at +-80%. The only things I put to one side or another are lead guitar parts, which are always off-center around +-5-20%, or occasionally vocals, though again, I 'balance' them if I'm double-tracking them. What does offsetting them to one side do? (besides the obvious )

You don't pan pairs the same amount. That's why I said +/- 80 and 60. But it's irrelevant because TS only needs two takes.
#14
Quote by Cavalcade
You don't pan pairs the same amount. That's why I said +/- 80 and 60. But it's irrelevant because TS only needs two takes.

I'm a touch confused. You mean one guitar part, recorded twice, you'd put one at, say, 60% Left and the other 80% right?
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#15
Quote by HeretiK538
I'm a touch confused. You mean one guitar part, recorded twice, you'd put one at, say, 60% Left and the other 80% right?

Pairs. Pairs pairs pairs. I'm talking about for four tracks, two pairs, panned 80% left and right, and 60% le- why are we even talking about this? You don't even need four tracks for what TS is asking, just more than one.
#16
Quote by ChemicalFire
Bass guitar.

If you don't have a bass guitar, add a bass guitar.

Bass guitar is more important to the size of a guitar part than the guitar itself is.

Bass guitar.


More bass guitar.


More of it, not less, more.


More bass guitar.

This, and some more bass guitar. Maybe even a little extra bass guitar to make it super br00tz?
#17
I wrote a blog on mixing a while back. Check out http://greenroommusicblog.blogspot.ca/2012/10/a-non-technical-article-on-mixing.html

Here is a part of it:

"Imagine you’re downtown Manhattan, surrounded by a huge density of very tall buildings. Which one is the tallest? Well, it can be hard to say. From where you’re standing, they’re all pretty darn tall. In fact, with that many of them at the height they are, does it really matter which one is tallest? In a room full of giants, none of them look especially large. Now, take one of those buildings and put it in a small town. All of a sudden, that one building stands out like crazy. It’s monstrous! That’s right. Everything is relative. Not everything can be louder than everything else. We judge volume in a mix not on its own merits, but by comparing it to the other elements in the mix. If one thing is going to be very big, then you need to have things around it that are comparatively very small.

Imagine a metal band. The drummer wants big, huge, crashing drums. The guitarist wants a wall of massive guitars. The bass player wants to rock the house with his crushing rhythm. The singer just wants to be heard. Everyone says, “turn me up.” Obviously this won’t work. If you listen to most metal recordings with those huge walls of guitars, you might be surprised when you *really* listen, that the drums and bass aren’t nearly as loud as you thought they were."

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#18
When I record guitars, I put an SM57 on each speaker in the cab, then two shotgun condensers in the room, then record that. So it's four separate guitar tracks (with four separate mics.) Mix the room mics down to about 30%, with the cab mics at 100%. Then pan that track left, and double the whole thing. Sounds HUGE.
#19
Quote by rockownsyou
When I record guitars, I put an SM57 on each speaker in the cab, then two shotgun condensers in the room, then record that. So it's four separate guitar tracks (with four separate mics.) Mix the room mics down to about 30%, with the cab mics at 100%. Then pan that track left, and double the whole thing. Sounds HUGE.

Sounds huge as one single track that, no matter how you pan it, will come straight up the middle.
#20
Quote by Poisonouspot
Im not sure how to explain this, but when I record my guitar through my amp its sounds very weak in comparison to the other instruments I use plugins through logic with (bass, drums etc),
is there something I'm missing?
Thanks


Here's an article I know of which might help you:

http://www.axemanjim.co.uk/recording.html

it's point 4

/Dave
#21
"For a big guitar sound, you’ll need at least four guitar tracks, probably six, possibly eight. "

I disagree with this. Double-tracking can yield great results. Maybe even triple-tracking. But often times, a single guitar will sound bigger than a part that has been, what, "octo" tracked, or whatever.

You do get to a point where each layer makes the overall sound smaller. There's no air between the parts to allow them to breathe, and as a result, they all sound like they've been squished into a box that's just far too small for them. They start to sound smothered.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.