#1
So doe soundproofing from the inside FOR the inside also stop (partially) sounds form outside?

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#2
If you actually soundproof, then yes. If you aren't building the room literally from scratch or don't have $20,000+ then you aren't going to actually soundproof anything.
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#3
^.

Bass traps, eggs packages and stuff won't really do a lot.
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#4
This thread doesn't even make sense... what are you trying to ask, TS?
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#5
I believe he means that if you actually soundproof a room will that stop outside sounds from coming into the room. Which the answer is yes it should. Soundproofing is all about isolating the room from the outside world so that sound is not transfered between the room & what's outside of it regardless where the source is. If sound could come into the room then that means it can also go out the same way & your room is not adequately soundproofed.
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#7
I meant Room treatment.

Sometimes my neighbour has his music loud, and then while not hearing any music, do hear that lowish rumble.

Not sub bass, but rather the annoying echoey bass frequencies around 80 hz or so.

Thing is it goes away at different points in my room, and I suspect it may somehow get caught in my room where it becomes like an inside sound.


Hope it does make any sense

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#8
^ That's called a room mode, where the bass has made a standing wave between two walls.

Yes, acoustic absorption in the right place might help. Another method would be a diffusive panel, which causes the wave to deflect randomly rather than back the way it came.
#9
Quote by FireHawk
Sound proofing also is t the same as room treating


No, they're two entirely different things. One can be entirely exclusive of the other.

I wrote an article fairly recently on my blog about sound proofing and sound treatment.

http://greenroommusicblog.blogspot.ca/2013/05/sound-proofing-and-sound-treatment.html

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#10
Thnx for the answers, though I still feel like noone directly answered apart from Tim Mop and J Dawg.

This was after my edit though so my apologies if my original query was ambiguous.

So in short resonating rumble bass from outside could be negated with room treatment inside my own room?

I can't really go in my neigbours house and soundproof his walls now can I

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 29, 2013,
#11
Quote by xxdarrenxx


So in short resonating rumble bass from outside could be negated with room treatment inside my own room?



Yes! Even as much as putting a panel that's slightly angled to the plane of the parallell walls will do a fair bit to stopping the resonance.

By finding out the worst resonant frequency in the room you can work out which wall is doing the most damage (unless your room is a cube, then it's all of them). If the frequency is 80Hz for example we can use the equation:

frequency = (speed of sound)/wavelength

wavelength = (speed of sound)/frequency

= 340(ish)/80 = 4.25m

now whichever pair of walls is separated by the distance you worked out is the first one to treat

Someone double check this, I always make mistakes! :P
#12
Mmmm..... I'd be *really* surprised if that worked. Room treatment controls how sound inside the treated room behaves. This sound is coming into the room from somewhere else.

Maybe the john sayers forum might be the best place to ask this kind of thing. There are acoustic engineers, pro studio designers, etc. who all hang out there.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#13
Quote by axemanchris
Mmmm..... I'd be *really* surprised if that worked. Room treatment controls how sound inside the treated room behaves. This sound is coming into the room from somewhere else.

Maybe the john sayers forum might be the best place to ask this kind of thing. There are acoustic engineers, pro studio designers, etc. who all hang out there.

CT


Will keep this in mind thnx

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