#1
I'm looking for someone who can give me some advice about my guitar. I recently got some Ernie Ball Not Even Slinky's, a large gauge, and am having trouble tuning them on my guitar. I am a bit of a noob with only a few successful stringings under my belt but I am confused and irritated as hell as my strings don't get into tune, as far as my tuner says, until my bridge is completely extended and I risk breaking my strings and even then not in tune.

I have been told I have a dynamic/floating bridge otherwise known as a Floyd Rose bridge however I have not been successful in finding any really helpful information that pertains to my particular guitar.
#2
First you should take this to the Electric Guitar forum, second it sounds like you didn't set up the floating bridge right. There is a guide on the EG forum, third you should stretch your strings before putting them on your guitar. Also did you remove all of the strings from your guitar before restringing?
Quote by barden1069
A "tubescreamer" is a person paid by a guitarist to stand behind the amp and scream at the tubes. This terrifies the tubes into overdriving and delivers a thick, harmonic-rich tone.
#4
Not even slinky's are meant for low tunings.



Were you trying to tune them to E standard tuning?!?
I felt like I could barely get them to tune to B standard..
Pretty sure this is the wrong forum too.
Last edited by noisewall11 at Aug 27, 2013,
#5
Shit, my bad. Yeah, removed the strings before restringing. It's likely I didn't set up the bridge properly as I left it the way it was before, since I have tightened the tension to help make up for the added strength of the strings and the strangest part is I can get some strings in tune and others my tuner completely skips. I get 5a perfect but when I move to the next one down it shows tuning for 5a then 3g, I find no middle ground and if I add much more tension I will begin to lift the bridge...normally I would just take this to my local guitar shop however the only one in my city has been closed for months with no signs of opening.

The strings have been on the guitar for a few hours now and I still can't dial it in...I guess I'm just looking for some tips, if any, when dealing with a floating bridge and really thick strings, aside from make sure the hole is big enough(they are) and something like taking the previous strings out first.
#7
Quote by noisewall11
Not even slinky's are meant for low tunings.



Were you trying to tune them to E standard tuning?!?
I felt like I could barely get them to tune to B standard..
Pretty sure this is the wrong forum too.

You kidding me? I play .11s and .12s in e standard all the time
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#9
Not with a Floyd Rose.

If its a vintage style trem then I can help you.

But considering we don't even know what your guitar is...you're leaving out pretty key info.
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#10
You should put all 5 springs in the back of the floating trem probably. Fat strings have more tension (ie pull harder on the bridge) and you need the extra springs to counteract that.

A truss rod adjustment may be needed as well (but that's secondary to getting the bridge level).

If you don't use the floating trem, you can also block it off and not use it.
Quote by SleepTalkinMan
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#11
Quote by stratman_13
You kidding me? I play .11s and .12s in e standard all the time




Yeah, so do I. I just put .11s on my jazzmaster recently, and they feel like strings that were meant for higher tunings (e standard for instance). The set of not even slinky's I had were much thicker than either of those gauges... and they specifically said they were made for lower tunings.
#12
Psh. Please. Whenever I get around to replacing the nut and refretting my strat I plan on setting it up for .13s

Love big strings. I hate feeling like I'm playing on limp noodles
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#13
Quote by stratman_13
Not with a Floyd Rose.

If its a vintage style trem then I can help you.

But considering we don't even know what your guitar is...you're leaving out pretty key info.


I can tell you it is a Yamaha RGX112, and it is at least 30 years old. It certainly is no floyd rose.
#14
Quote by OneHappyCamper
You should put all 5 springs in the back of the floating trem probably. Fat strings have more tension (ie pull harder on the bridge) and you need the extra springs to counteract that.

A truss rod adjustment may be needed as well (but that's secondary to getting the bridge level).

If you don't use the floating trem, you can also block it off and not use it.



I do not use the trem too much as I'm seriously a beginner and I didn't think of blocking it off...I suppose just shoving something in the that is the size to stop it from moving isn't a good idea?

My problem is that my local guitar shop (within 80 miles, no car) has been closed until further notice...for over a month. So I'm kinda dangling in the wind here if it takes an official piece.
#15
Quote by noisewall11
Not even slinky's are meant for low tunings.



Were you trying to tune them to E standard tuning?!?
I felt like I could barely get them to tune to B standard..
Pretty sure this is the wrong forum too.


I use not-even-slinkys at D# standard.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#16
Quote by breakingwheel
I do not use the trem too much as I'm seriously a beginner and I didn't think of blocking it off...I suppose just shoving something in the that is the size to stop it from moving isn't a good idea?

My problem is that my local guitar shop (within 80 miles, no car) has been closed until further notice...for over a month. So I'm kinda dangling in the wind here if it takes an official piece.


How many springs are in there? Do you have any extra springs with your guitar? I suppose not since it's so old.

But seeing as it's a low end Yamaha guitar and you don't use the trem much, I think blocking it is your best course of action.

It is exactly what you said, just shove a piece of wood (should be smooth and hard so it doesn't kill the vibrations) between the tremolo body (from the back side of the guitar, into the tremolo cavity) and the guitar wood, and then put strings on, tune them, and then remove the trem strings so that the piece of wood is held firmly in place by the tension of the springs.

Beware though, although it seems like it can't ever move, of course my wood block fell off just as I was starting the first song of my show, and then I treated the audience to a marvelous display of searching the stage on all fours to find the damn block before putting it in, tuning the guitar and starting the song again.

I think after you fit the piece of wood in there, you could use a bit of duct tape to tape it to the tremolo body (and then poke holes thru the tape to feed strings through).

EDIT: See pics:



That one ^^^^ didn't remove his springs, no idea why, I think it's better to remove them.

That should be enough, but you could block a floating trem from both sides like so:

Quote by SleepTalkinMan
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Last edited by OneHappyCamper at Aug 27, 2013,
#17
That is great advice. And an interesting story.

I have three springs in my guitar but now I see slots for two more springs. I will keep my eyes out for pieces of wood I can jam in there.

I just wanna play.

Could I tune it lower and still get a decent sound? If so what hertz should I set my piece of crap tuner for?
Last edited by breakingwheel at Aug 27, 2013,
#18
Wow, you really shouldn't take the strings off a Floyd Rose, I thought everybody knew this.

You restring one by one and tune/re-tune as you go.


If you've taken every string off a FR guitar you are most likely going to have to take it go get repaired.
#19
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Wow, you really shouldn't take the strings off a Floyd Rose, I thought everybody knew this.

You restring one by one and tune/re-tune as you go.


If you've taken every string off a FR guitar you are most likely going to have to take it go get repaired.


It's not a FR, someone told me I had a Floyd Rose style bridge but now I see that that was completely inaccurate. No, I have a low end Yamaha.
#20
It's not a FR, its just an old strat style trem. From the pics I've googled I see that it most likely has a 6 screw bridge that can only go down in pitch and not up. I don't know if that is even called a floating tremolo.

Breakingwheel, some people also solder pennies together and shove that in between the trem and body. You could go that route if you know how to solder/have a soldering iron.

Tuning the guitar lower doesn't mean setting your tuner to a different frequency, It means not tuning it to EADGBE (E standard), but to another tuning completely. Like, DGCFAD (D standard, 2 steps (frets) down from E standard).
Quote by SleepTalkinMan
"Ooh! Straight-jackets online! Christmas sorted."
#22
I've seen people with the penny thing, and I just don't get it.

A chunk of wood works just as well and is way less work.
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#23
Well, after a faint glimmer of hope; I switched my tuner to chromatic and had good results for a little while but as I moved onto the the string they just kept getting looser and looser until I'm winding so tight I'm back where I started with the super elevated bridge.

Yeah, pennies won't work for me as I'm currently living in the EU, although creative, seems like a bit too much work. I will certainly have to keep my eyes open for something or someone who can take some dimensions and saw some wood for me.

Thanks again, bud, was having a bad week...well it's still bad but it's nice to know cool people still exist.
#24
You really honestly should take it in and get it set up, because your nut slots aren't going to fit those string gauges anyway.

You need to have the nut filed. And since it's an old guitar it probably wouldn't hurt to just take it in somewhere for a tuneup. Let them set it up for the string gauge you want. They'll handle intonation, truss rod, bridge tension, etc for you. That's all stuff you don't need to be concerning yourself with just yet, unless you're the type of person (like myself and a lot of users on here) who prefer to do all that stuff themselves.
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#25
I did have it in the shop about a year ago after I snapped a couple sets on my first ventures with this guitar, my first guitar obviously, and although I'm sure they did little other than what I asked of them, string and tune, it seemed to work just fine although I have yet to hear it on am amp...

Yeah the problem with the shop is I'm kinda S.O.L. in that dept. because the ****ers decided to take an indefinite vacation, for over a month now...yeah, got a trip to the states planned and I would hate to leave this behind because I couldn't buy a hard case.

Erm, thanks guys for the help. I will take the advice with me.