#1
hello all sorry for the stupid question is useing tabs cheating on how to read sheet music. iam been kinda learning how to read sheet its hard at frist but tabs are so much easy should i say no to reeading sheet and just stick with tabs and learn sheet music later on thanks all
#3
Not at all, it's a tool to learn a song.
Music notation shows you exactly how to play something, tab dictates to you a little more. For example, if notation tells you to play a 'D' note, you can choose where to play that 'D', tab will give you a fingering that the tabber has chosen. Nothing to say you can't change that yourself though.

It's not cheating at all, it's tailored to people who don't want to be classical musicians, session musicians (although notation is being used less and less here) or will likely never be in a situation where you will turn up to a gig and read with a band.
#4
you might consider learning english a priority over music


have you considered that it's not their first language ?

Also What Cold Reader
#5
No. It's theoretically a better suited option than sheet music for guitar. There's many ways to play a note of a certain pitch on guitar, -while on for example a piano, there's only one. If you were going to play a guitar piece by some artist as an exact imitation, tab would be the only way.

Practically though, it's just a great way for people to learn playing music without knowing theory. Of course, the best would be to know both.
The way I see it, if using tabs is cheating, then using sheet music is cheating as well. They are extremely similar in that they both tell you how to play the piece. It doesn't make any sense.
#6
Ok thanks and yes I do speak English and only English, I have a slight learning disatably if you must know.so sometimes my topics don't pound right
#7
No it's not cheating, but using tabs will only get you so far, to really andvance as a musician you should try to learn songs by ear, start with some really easy songs first, and when you have your ear trained and can figure out the chords and scales they use in the song, you could try moving up to more difficult stuff. besides if there is a really special song you want to find, but there are no tabs for it, then knowing how to figure out songs by ear will really help alot.
#8
Quote by fanapathy
No. It's theoretically a better suited option than sheet music for guitar. There's many ways to play a note of a certain pitch on guitar, -while on for example a piano, there's only one. If you were going to play a guitar piece by some artist as an exact imitation, tab would be the only way.

Practically though, it's just a great way for people to learn playing music without knowing theory. Of course, the best would be to know both.
The way I see it, if using tabs is cheating, then using sheet music is cheating as well. They are extremely similar in that they both tell you how to play the piece. It doesn't make any sense.

Nope, it seems you don't know enough about standard notation. It is very easy to notate where you want someone to play a pitch using a combination of string numbers and position numbers.
But I will agree with you that standard notation is flawed and there are things that are you can not communicate, but then tab can't communicate these either.
#9
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Nope, it seems you don't know enough about standard notation. It is very easy to notate where you want someone to play a pitch using a combination of string numbers and position numbers.
But I will agree with you that standard notation is flawed and there are things that are you can not communicate, but then tab can't communicate these either.


Interesting. I didn't realize this. I've only seen fingering sometimes in piano pieces and haven't read much for guitar.
So if we want a full bend on B, 17b19. The same pitch could be done on e 12b14 and G 21b23 but let's say that's not how it's meant to be played. This sort of thing could be notated? I guess you've already answered this but cool, I'm pretty wrong on my point then.
#10
Yep, but depending on the conventions you may do it a few ways.
1. Is to write the start the starting pitch (E) and then put in the bend symbol. Then on top write in full tone bend and with the string number inside a circle on top. Then next to the note put down what finger you want the player to bend with.
2. If on the other hand you want to notate exactly when the player should start bending and exactly how long they should bend for. You put in the starting pitch and the duration of the starting pitch (this is to tell them how long they should hold the note for before they start bending). Then place the bend symbol and the note that you want to bend to and its duration. This time around you don't need to put full bend, half bend or quarter bend because you've already notated the pitch. But you do need to put in the string number. You may also notate exactly when you want the player to come back down to the original pitch and how long he should take.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Aug 29, 2013,