#1
So when layering tracks, how do you do the 2nd one?

Do you mute the first one?

If you leave it on do you pan it first, or leave it centered?

I find I can sometimes get huger sounds when I mute the first track, but when doing harmonies I prefer to hear the first track.

I think the former (huge sound) is from the fact I don't automatically mimic the first track, and that it offsets the 2nd track a little more natural.

Just interested in seeing what you guys do.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 28, 2013,
#2
If its double tracked rhythm guitars i usually pan 80% left and right. Then when vocals or solo's kick in I automate the panning to swing them out 100% left and right. I also like to automate the volume when vocals and leads are going bringing the rhythm guitars down no more than -1.5 db usually does the the trick. For harmony guitar bits I would normally swing them both out to about 12% left and right.

Quad tracking would be slightly different. I would have two panned 100% left and right. It's personal taste for the second group either 80% or 70% left and right. I would employ the same volume dips for when vocals or any other lead instrument came to the front. The other main thing for quad guitars, it's always an idea to track the second inner tracks with slightly less dirt for more separation.
Last edited by SHaun Steel at Aug 28, 2013,
#3
I believe he's asking if, when multi-tracking guitar parts, do you mute the first one when recording the second one, or do you pan it to the left and then pan the one you're recording to the right. Correct me if I'm wrong. In general, I will record the first run, then mute it and record the second run. I find that if I leave both tracks audible, the second track will be less tight because when I'm recording I feel like the first track is sort of "tugging" on my playing and I'll think the one that's already recorded is the one I'm currently playing. It's a very strange feeling. I've had satisfactory results using both methods though.

If you're just asking about panning in general, than SHaun hit the nail right on the head
#4
Quote by Tracii Lee
I believe he's asking if, when multi-tracking guitar parts, do you mute the first one when recording the second one, or do you pan it to the left and then pan the one you're recording to the right. Correct me if I'm wrong. In general, I will record the first run, then mute it and record the second run. I find that if I leave both tracks audible, the second track will be less tight because when I'm recording I feel like the first track is sort of "tugging" on my playing and I'll think the one that's already recorded is the one I'm currently playing. It's a very strange feeling. I've had satisfactory results using both methods though.

If you're just asking about panning in general, than SHaun hit the nail right on the head



No you're right. I also get good results with both.

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#5
For me, if the tracks are identical, I will mute the first one. If the one guitar is doing a melody over chords, I will leave the first one on, as I find it easy to play the melody against the chords.
#6
if i'm doubling, i sometimes do what you do and mute the other tracks. but generally i just leave all the tracks on, but have my recording track be much louder.

and if i'm doubling, i hard-pan the first track and the new track i'm layering to opposite speakers, i think it's easier to get it tight that way. if i'm recording something over a bunch of existing tracks, i just pan everything to the approximate positions i plan on having in the song.
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#7
If it's the same thing being played I tend to turn the other one down or mute it. I'd rather listening to the drums than the other guitar part, but I still like to hear the other guitar.
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#10
Most of the time I use an already set up setup, with already set amp simulators and cab simulators and stuff, so I keep one hard left and one hard right, and if I need to I add two track panned like 70-80% left and right.
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