#1
Hi, i hope is is not too basic and sound stupid but i am having issues with counting beats of some songs. Can someone help me as to how to do this with any song i listen and play accordingly. Basically what should i be listening to in order to figure it out. To be clear how to find out beats by listening to the drum part of any song. Thanks
#2
normally (i.e. there are tons of exceptions) the bass drum is on beats 1 and 3 of the bar (in a 4/4 tune). Snare drum is on beats 2 and 4. Hi-hat can either be on all beats, or playing quavers (i.e. two hits per beat, so hitting 8 the hi-hat 8 times in a 4/4 bar).

So taking AC/DC's Back in Black as an example, since it's pretty well-known and pretty handy for this example:

Those little muted strums at the start are

"1, 2, 3, 4 [new bar] 1, 2, 3, [rest]4" (that's the first two bars)

and then the song proper starts on beat 1 again and follows the beat i outlined above:

1 (bass and hi-hat)

and (hi-hat)

2 (snare and hi-hat)

and (hi-hat)

3 (bass and hi-hat)

and (hi-hat)

4 (snare and hi-hat)

and (hi-hat)

And that's your whole bar.

Also if you look at tabs which also have music alongside, they'll give you some idea of how to count, too.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
Quote by Dave_Mc
normally (i.e. there are tons of exceptions) the bass drum is on beats 1 and 3 of the bar (in a 4/4 tune). Snare drum is on beats 2 and 4. Hi-hat can either be on all beats, or playing quavers (i.e. two hits per beat, so hitting 8 the hi-hat 8 times in a 4/4 bar).

So taking AC/DC's Back in Black as an example, since it's pretty well-known and pretty handy for this example:

Those little muted strums at the start are

"1, 2, 3, 4 [new bar] 1, 2, 3, [rest]4" (that's the first two bars)

and then the song proper starts on beat 1 again and follows the beat i outlined above:

1 (bass and hi-hat)

and (hi-hat)

2 (snare and hi-hat)

and (hi-hat)

3 (bass and hi-hat)

and (hi-hat)

4 (snare and hi-hat)

and (hi-hat)

And that's your whole bar.

Also if you look at tabs which also have music alongside, they'll give you some idea of how to count, too.

Thanks a lot, was really helpful. I guess i would need waaaay more listening and learning before figuring out JAZZ.
#4
Don't listen to only drums, if you have odd meter going in there it might be pretty hard, in that case guitars help too.
#5
It is NEVER stupid to try to learn - anything.

I might suggest you pick a song you know, get the tab or actual music, whichever you are more comfortable with, and follow it along with your ears while you try to follow the music with your eyes (or even with your hands).

Starting with something you already know will help, but don't get hung up on being perfect.

Then try something you don't know, preferably with a reasonably "constant timing": i.e. stays in 4/4 or whatever - at least for most of the song.

Try to do this without the music as your "ear" develops.

Later you can get into more difficult pieces - like many jazz tunes that change key as well as timing.

Enjoy this! It is really a wonderful day when you make the "breakthrough" that lets you understand the music better with just your ears.
#6
Quote by sundar334
Thanks a lot, was really helpful. I guess i would need waaaay more listening and learning before figuring out JAZZ.


no worries

As the others said, it's not like you can't listen to anything you want, but if you're actually trying to analyse it, then probably start with the easier stuff.

Quote by Reages
Don't listen to only drums, if you have odd meter going in there it might be pretty hard, in that case guitars help too.


true but in a more simple piece the drums will help, and even in a more complex one i'd say so, too. I mean drums are the (obvious) rhythm- so it sorta makes sense to listen to them, especially when there are a few tricks (like I mentioned) that often give you clues with drums as to which beat you're on.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
Quote by dkcol
It is NEVER stupid to try to learn - anything.

I might suggest you pick a song you know, get the tab or actual music, whichever you are more comfortable with, and follow it along with your ears while you try to follow the music with your eyes (or even with your hands).

Starting with something you already know will help, but don't get hung up on being perfect.

Then try something you don't know, preferably with a reasonably "constant timing": i.e. stays in 4/4 or whatever - at least for most of the song.

Try to do this without the music as your "ear" develops.

Later you can get into more difficult pieces - like many jazz tunes that change key as well as timing.

Enjoy this! It is really a wonderful day when you make the "breakthrough" that lets you understand the music better with just your ears.

Thanks, now i am practisin by trying to tap my feet in time to every piece of music i hear on tv and radio
#8
Quote by Reages
Don't listen to only drums, if you have odd meter going in there it might be pretty hard, in that case guitars help too.

Actually when i started to listen to music i just used to concentrate on the guitarist and the vocalist and never listened to what other musicians in the band were doing lol. So i never knew as to how a guitarist keeps playing in time with a drummer,
#9
i played drums before i played guitar so that kinda helps, lol.

Obviously if you want to play guitar learning drums to pro level is probably overkill, but a few of the basic beats (even learning to recognise them, rather than play them) wouldn't hurt. I'm sure there are youtube vids of basic drum beats on youtube (never looked, but there are plenty of guitar videos on there)- basic rock beat (like the one in back in black), basic 6/8 beat, maybe swing and stuff like that.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
Quote by Dave_Mc
i played drums before i played guitar so that kinda helps, lol.

Obviously if you want to play guitar learning drums to pro level is probably overkill, but a few of the basic beats (even learning to recognise them, rather than play them) wouldn't hurt. I'm sure there are youtube vids of basic drum beats on youtube (never looked, but there are plenty of guitar videos on there)- basic rock beat (like the one in back in black), basic 6/8 beat, maybe swing and stuff like that.

Thanks for the tips. I tried practising simple songs by listening to the drum cover of the actual song on youtube and find it much easier to keep time and actually understand what the drummer is doing.
#11
To me it's just kind of natural. I just start tapping my foot or clapping my hands or something when I hear music. I just feel the beat. And it doesn't need to have drums to have a beat in it.
Quote by AlanHB
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#12
^ agreed, same here. But I figured giving him a few concrete pointers might help.

Quote by sundar334
Thanks for the tips. I tried practising simple songs by listening to the drum cover of the actual song on youtube and find it much easier to keep time and actually understand what the drummer is doing.


I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?