#1
I have an Ibanez S470 with a Seymour Duncan Jazz, SD Classic Stack, and a SD JB that I'm looking to sell. Would I be better off selling the SD pick-ups and the guitar (I'd put the stock ones back in) separately or should I just sell the guitar with the upgraded pick-ups still in it?

Note: I'm also considering trading this for a tube amp (depending on what people offer in trade), would that retain more value than selling it for cash and then purchasing an amp?
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Last edited by Robbin'TheHood at Aug 29, 2013,
#2
You may be able to sell it quicker if you advertise that you'v replaced the crappy stock pickups with better ones.

You would most likely get more money if you replaced the stock ones and sold them separately.
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#3
Nearly always the best way to get the best money is to remove the pickups, replace them with the original pickups and sell the guitar and the pickups separately.

Pickups are not considered an upgrade. They're a side grade. When you add something to a guitar that it didn't have before (no, don't say "tone?"), such as a trem or a case, you've upgraded the offering (assuming that it's been done well). But you've also narrowed your audience for the guitar. Every guitar has pickups. Just because you prefer the sound of a random pickup doesn't mean that the guitar has been upgraded or that someone else will like that sound. Whatever you spent on the pickups/wiring/pots, etc. is irrelevant.

There's also this -- I much prefer buying a stock guitar over one that's been tweaked. I have NO idea if the changes have been handled competently, and I really don't relish the business of fixing someone's poor soldering, sanding, painting or other modifications.

If you're selling a guitar with expensive pickups, don't be surprised or disappointed if the guitar actually gets offers that are *below* what would be offered for a stock guitar. What you may consider an upgrade might only be a potential PIA in someone else's view.
#4
Always sell your stuff stock or face the fact that it's worth less than it would be stock. I laugh whenever I see someone's painted, customized, modded to hell and back guitar on craigslist with all of the mods ADDED ON to the price.

It's worth that much to you yes, but the chances that someone will enjoy the exact same mods as you are very slim.

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#5
Quote by dspellman
Nearly always the best way to get the best money is to remove the pickups, replace them with the original pickups and sell the guitar and the pickups separately.

Pickups are not considered an upgrade. They're a side grade. When you add something to a guitar that it didn't have before (no, don't say "tone?"), such as a trem or a case, you've upgraded the offering (assuming that it's been done well). But you've also narrowed your audience for the guitar. Every guitar has pickups. Just because you prefer the sound of a random pickup doesn't mean that the guitar has been upgraded or that someone else will like that sound. Whatever you spent on the pickups/wiring/pots, etc. is irrelevant.

There's also this -- I much prefer buying a stock guitar over one that's been tweaked. I have NO idea if the changes have been handled competently, and I really don't relish the business of fixing someone's poor soldering, sanding, painting or other modifications.

If you're selling a guitar with expensive pickups, don't be surprised or disappointed if the guitar actually gets offers that are *below* what would be offered for a stock guitar. What you may consider an upgrade might only be a potential PIA in someone else's view.



Bam, great post.
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#6
no one savvy EVER pays for any tweaks to an instrument unless they are the exact ones you would perform yourself. always return the guitar to stock before you sell it.
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#7
^ heck if you're savvy even if they were upgrades you'd have performed yourself you'll pretend they weren't

+1 on what dspellman said, in other words.
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#8
Never upgrade unless it's for your personal tastes on a guitar you don't plan to sell. I have yet to see a guitar with mods sell for significantly more than the same guitar with no mods. Usually the price is the exact same or within $20.

So yeah, pull the upgraded pups out, put the old ones back in and sell the two separately.
#9
Quote by samuraigoomba
Never upgrade unless it's for your personal tastes on a guitar you don't plan to sell. I have yet to see a guitar with mods sell for significantly more than the same guitar with no mods. Usually the price is the exact same or within $20.

So yeah, pull the upgraded pups out, put the old ones back in and sell the two separately.


I don't mind returning it to stock; I just wanted to know how to best sell all of the components. On a side note, this used to be my preferred go to guitar, but I personally could never stand the sound of the stock p-ups, so I put the duncans I liked in it. I never planned on selling it, but my tastes changed and it no longer fits the bill.
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You are so happy to eat a muffin it's kinda scary.
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Last edited by Robbin'TheHood at Aug 30, 2013,
#10
I have the same problem, a DK2 with EMGs, I could throw the Duncan Designed ones back in there. I bought a used Prestige with Evos, but probably would have bought it with the stock pups for the same price, so I'd say swap them back and get more money
#11
Upgrades almost always make a guitar guitar worth less. Because unless the buyer knows you he has no reason to believe that the upgrades were installed correctly.
#12
I think it's the same with just about anything: cars, motorcycles, guitars, boats. etc. You'll make out better selling something as stock and selling the custom items separately. When a "toy" can be customized, most buyers have their own ideas for custom add-ons.

Guys I know who've gone wild customizing bikes lose big time when they sell.