#1
I am not sure if this is exactly where this should go but wat are some of the easiest songs by composers such as mozart ect. to transcribe to guitar? I want to become better with theory and i know quite a it of theory is in classical and it seems like it would be fun to play as well. sugestions???
#2
A lot of theory is in classical? And it should be easy and qualify as shred. Dude you need to phrase your request differently or these guys will rip you right apart. Go for some Vivaldi or Bach violin concertos maybe. If I knew what you like I could help you better.
Last edited by Facecut at Sep 2, 2013,
#3
Quote by Facecut
A lot of theory is in classical? And it should be easy and qualify as shred. Dude you need to phrase your request differently or these guys will rip you right apart. Go for some Vivaldi or Bach violin concertos maybe. If I knew what you like I could help you better.

when you say what i like do you mean which composers or what?
#4
Quote by xxNOAHSHREDxx
I am not sure if this is exactly where this should go but wat are some of the easiest songs by composers such as mozart ect. to transcribe to guitar? I want to become better with theory and i know quite a it of theory is in classical and it seems like it would be fun to play as well. sugestions???

Most baroque and early classical is straightforward to transcribe, considering that the violin tended to fill the same role as a soloist now commonly prescribed to the guitar.

I personally recommend Vivaldi's violin concertos, since they are written for a variety of skill levels and tend to demonstrate basic diatonic theory in a way that is easy to relate to as a guitarist.

You're asking a pretty vague question, so that's the best I can do for you right now. If you can come up with a more specific question, I can provide some more specific answers.
#5
Theory is in all music.

Saying you want to learn classical music because there's "lots of theory" in it is like saying you want to read Dickens because there's "lots of English" in it.

If you want to learn theory learn it, learning Bach is neither here nor there as far as that particular goal is concerned.
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#6
Quote by xxNOAHSHREDxx
when you say what i like do you mean which composers or what?


Yes maybe give an example of skill level and style. Is rondo alla turca too hard or too easy for example. do you want something more virtuous or simple. Are you proficient with alternate picking?
#7
Lol. Mozart and shred.

My feeling is that baroque will transfer much better to guitar than classical. I think aesthetically, a lot of baroque music is actually very similar to rock. Also, it tends to be quite flashy, and not too complicated.

Look up pretty much any Italian baroque composer who wrote for violin, like others said.

This and this are really cool pieces by Castello, there are two solo sonatas as well, but I prefer the sonatas for multiple instruments. If you can find someone else to play these with that would be really cool.
(incidentally, the original edition from 1658 is here. I don't recommend using this! If you can't find a modern edition of either of those, I'm actually preparing an edition at some point, so message me if you're interested.)

Vivaldi is awesome, there's a reason he's so popular, and it's because his music is unpretentious, really exciting, and really well written, too. There's so many concertos to choose from, and I'm sure they're all on imslp. The bassoon concertos might work quite well on guitar, too.


Tartini is good. Corelli is pretty cool, too. A lot of Austrian and south german composers in the 17th century were very influenced by the italian style, the most famous is Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber, some of his stuff is pretty crazy. Also, Johann Schelzmer, Westhoff, Walther. There's so many composers around then writing for violin, just read about it and you'll soon find a goldmine of names that you can look up to see if you like their music.

Also, some keyboard music would probably work. Buxtehude, Couperin, Rameau, Froberger... the list is endless. Just listen and see what you like.

Not baroque, but people are fixated with playing Paganini on guitar, and why not?

You'll find loads of music by all these composers here
Last edited by National_Anthem at Sep 3, 2013,
#8
You mean Neoclassical music?

Bach has sort of a mechanical quality to it due to rhythmic uniformity, but it's also deeply emotive and it requires a lot of technical focus to bring out the phrasing. Mozart tends to be moody and lyrical, and requires very gentle treatment technically.

When I listen to Neoclassical shredding, I hear none of that depth. The style usually amounts to running up and down harmonic minor scales over extremely generic, rhythmically and harmonically dead chord progressions. You can look up all the Bach and Mozart violin music you want, but I don't think you'll find it very interesting if shredding is your goal.

Actually playing classical guitar decently takes years of dedication and doesn't translate well to playing anything rock-oriented unless you make a serious effort to apply the techniques to other styles.

The theory you'll learn studying classical music has nothing to do with guitar or shredding. Most of your time will be spent writing labels below chords and avoiding parallel 5ths. All very important stuff if you want to play guitar at a high level, but it's definitely not about shredding.
Last edited by cdgraves at Sep 3, 2013,
#10
Quote by steven seagull
Theory is in all music.


Theory isn't 'in' any kind of music, Bach's chorale harmonisations stand independently of any of the systems invented to explain how they work. Saying that you want to learn classical music because there's lots of theory in it is more akin to saying that you want to read Dickens because there's 'lots of literary criticism in it'.

For the record I once transcribed the Gigue from Bach's Partita in D minor onto Guitar. The act of transcription definitely forces you into focusing on the notes more than just flicking through the score, which could be useful if you have a bad attention span and little patience for just score reading, on the other hand I wouldn't call the results anything really performable. The Violin and the Guitar are very different instruments at heart, the percussive attack of a finger or plectrum plucking a string is very different in character from the much smoother and more singing attack and sustain that can be achieved by a violinist bowing the strings, something of the original quality of the music played on the violin is always lost in the translation process. Most people who don't listen to classical music regularly probably can't hear or don't care about that though.
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#11
You might want to look into Bach's Well Tempered Clavier. There are some great pieces there that will really help get your skills up in picking. It is not too hard to listen to as well, as I do believe they were all designed for beginner, intermediate piano players.
#12
Bachs Air is a fun song to learn and easy enough. All those great melodic classics are good, you could also do Canon in D, not the rock version though, well whatever...you may if you like. Fun to play and people love them. They need a lot of sustain though.
#14
Quote by cdgraves
Nobody else needs to play Canon in D. It's been played enough.


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