#1
whats the advantage or each type of string gauge? and the disadvantages? I wanna change strings, and was wanting a new gauge.
thanks
-Let the led out-
#2
thin string gauge:

easier bends, snappier and brighter tone (which can be good or bad depending on what tone you're after), looser feel. reacts more to finger pressure, making it easier to overfret and cause out-of tune chords. also more prone to breaking and going out of tune.

thick string gauge:

generally longer life than thinner strings, louder, more sustain, plus you can whack them hard. harder to bend, mellower tone than thinner strings (good or bad depending on what tone you're after).
#3
Bigger is more beef.

Bitches love beef.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#4
I assume you're playing in standard tuning? and as people said, it depends on what genres you are playing, if it's jazz or something along those lines, you'll probably want thinner, if it's more rock/metal, you may be more suited to thicker strings (.52s maybe)
#5
Quote by NakedInTheRain
thin string gauge:

easier bends, snappier and brighter tone (which can be good or bad depending on what tone you're after), looser feel. reacts more to finger pressure, making it easier to overfret and cause out-of tune chords. also more prone to breaking and going out of tune.

thick string gauge:

generally longer life than thinner strings, louder, more sustain, plus you can whack them hard. harder to bend, mellower tone than thinner strings (good or bad depending on what tone you're after).


Pretty much this. I'd say the most noticeable thing would be the increased tension and the tightness on the upper frets. The feel is just completely different.

Soundwise, I don't know. I've switched a lot of string gauges and used a lot of different brands and haven't really noticed much of change in tone.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
#6
I use the same (10-52) but Dunlops. This is standard Eb mind you.
'93 Gibson LP Studio (498T/490R)-Ebony
'14 Gibson LP Standard (JB/Jazz)-Ocean Water Perimeter
Epi MKH LP Custom-7 (SD Custom Shop JB-7)-Ebony
+More

Maxon od808|Boss NS-2|Boss CE-5|
Line6 G55|Korg Pitchblack Pro

JVM 210h|1960a(V30/G12t-75)
#7
Skinny Top Heavy Bottom's are good for metal, drop tunings but they never feel that balanced to me when soloing across more than the top 3 strings (still the only thing ill put on my schecter though).
In standard tuning I see no reason to use anything but 9 or 10s on an electric guitar. But for ultimate tuning versatility the STHB can do Drop B tunings nicely for me.
#8
String gauges sound different, it's more noticeable unplugged, but the differences are there when it's plugged in as well. Lighter strings are easier to bend, but they also break more often.

I like different strings on different guitars. In standard tuning, I prefer 9 or 10s on a strat but use 11s on les pauls.