#1
Main goal is to turn my friends shed into a room where we can jam, hopefully at late hours, and not cause a noise disturbance to anyone around.
and also get good quality sound for recording instruments separately unless going straight through. So really just kill as much sound as possible while keep quality, yes i know sound proofing is a messy and hard/impossible thing to do.

-Me and a buddy are working on a room in his shed, the room is about 15x7 ft.

- All the walls are insulated with normal pink house fiber glass, we are putting up wooden walls over it currently. After that we plan to put maybe 10 audimute sheets hung up around all the walls as possible. Does anyone know anything about these sheets? the reviews seem good and videos prove them to be good. We are hoping all this will be able to sound proof the room as much as possible, and still be able to play at late hours without the neighbors hearing it.

-The roof has the same insulation and we are putting a thick layer of carpet padding to help the sound from not going through. We will probably end up tacking a sheet to the ceiling to make it better to the eye. There is also a area where we had to add a new strip and it doesn't match evenly.

-Floor, we aren't sure about, its just normal pieces off wood. So do we want the wood surface and carpet under things where necessary like drums, amps(which we also hope to lift on another absorbing material), desk, etc. Or we have normal house carpet we could put down all over. Any suggestions?

-Vocals, we were thinking just use a corner and make a booth with the sound sheets and that will give good enough quality and sound proof, but of course we would experiment all over the place as time goes by.

-A/C Here is a bit of a problem.. we are thinking we will just leave one spot open to instal a window unit when possible. And deal with either turning it on and off for recording, and just jam with it on, or what.

Looking to record a full band in there, not exactly live, but still be able to jam all day and possibly at night at decent volumes. Debating electric or acoustic drums, both are an option at hand. We'd all also be able to mic and use headphones or even plug straight in maybe.

Sorry to go through everything with so much, I just hope what i have plan is the right idea and will work for my needs. Any advice or comments would be amazing! Thanks ahead of time!
Ibanez K-5 Fieldy Signature
Ernie Ball SUB Series Sterling Stingray 4
Yorkville XC115 Bass Cab(w/head)

"It's better to burn out than fade away"
-Neil Young/Kurt Cobain
#2
1. Normally, you're not going to get true soundproofing in an existing structure, unless you basically build a room inside of a room, but since this is a shed outside, I'd think you could do it for significantly less than you would a room inside, and since it sounds like it's not completely finished yet, you can design it correctly the first time. Disclaimer: It's NOT going to be cheap. For reference, there's actually quite a few resources online if you search "soundproofing a shed," here's a few with some good info:

http://supersoundproofing.com/forum/index.php?topic=3333.0
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/aug06/articles/qa0806_2.htm
http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100413141511AA2gkEm

I've also heard really good things about acoustic ceiling panels being used, something like these:

http://www.armstrong.com/commceilingsna/products/ceilings/high-absorption-high-nrc/_/N-cZ1z141da

They also have the added benefit of not being completely flat... so they create less standing waves. You want something with a high Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) and Ceiling Attenuation Class (CAC) rating. Home Depot sells some good stuff here:

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/catalog/servlet/Navigation?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&N=5yc1vZc58iZ1ji#/?c=1&1ji=1ji

And here's a guide to the USG panels that contains the data on the different series:

http://www.homedepot.com/hdus/en_US/DTCCOM/HomePage/Categories/Building_Materials/Ceilings/Body/Docs/THD_Ceiling_SpecOrder_Broch.pdf

Theoretically, something with an NRG of .70 absorbs 70% of sound that strikes the surface. Pretty damn good for the price it costs...

2. Acoustically - Carpet is just about the worst material to use in your room. Don't put it on your ceiling, don't put on the floor. If you need something to hold your drum set in place, put a nice looking throw under it and that's it. Floating wooden floors are your best bet.

3. If you have room, I'd build a small booth in a corner as you describe. Line the entire thing with acoustic paneling to create a dead space. Generally, I tend to like vocals recorded in bigger spaces better than small ones... but you don't really have the room for it, so it'd be better to create a small isolation room than record out in the open with the drums and everything else. If you have enough space, you could make it large enough to fit a person sitting down with an acoustic, or to fit a 4x12 cab. Makes for some interesting sound possibilities, and it gives the person recording more confidence, because they're not having to perform for everyone, they're in their own little room where they can focus on themselves getting a good take, rather than what others are thinking of them singing at the top of their lungs in a completely silent room with the rest of the band and engineering listening

4. The window A/C unit is a fairly decent idea... Just make sure that it's fairly silent, you don't want that thing making tons of background noise in your recording.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#3
A double layer of at least 1/2 inch drywall will stop sound from going outside too. I put some 1 inch acoustic foam ceiling panels on my basement jam space, and it does a good job of making the sound not obnoxious.
Don't forget a nice, heavy door. You soundproof all the walls, and then forget to do something about the door.
A plexi-glass shield around the drum kit will make it more bearable too. We set up a drum "cage" in one of my old band's practice spaces. Framed in a small room and drywalled the bottom half, plexi-ed the top half, stuck a PA speaker in there so he could hear better. You don't have to do THAT, but they sell drum shields on the interwebs.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#4
Quote by ryanbwags
A plexi-glass shield around the drum kit will make it more bearable too. We set up a drum "cage" in one of my old band's practice spaces. Framed in a small room and drywalled the bottom half, plexi-ed the top half, stuck a PA speaker in there so he could hear better. You don't have to do THAT, but they sell drum shields on the interwebs.

If he wants to record the drums though, this is a pretty horrible idea. It'll focus the sound more and isolate it, sure... but you might as well just be programming drums at that point if you want to use it for recording of any sort. Also - As a drummer, I hate playing behind a drum shield
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#5
Quote by MatrixClaw
If he wants to record the drums though, this is a pretty horrible idea. It'll focus the sound more and isolate it, sure... but you might as well just be programming drums at that point if you want to use it for recording of any sort. Also - As a drummer, I hate playing behind a drum shield


It was really great when the drummer wanted to whine about things. Or, you know, do anything except drum.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#6
Quote by ryanbwags
It was really great when the drummer wanted to whine about things. Or, you know, do anything except drum.

Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#7
I understand it would take a lot more work for the room to really be soundproof. But for my case specifically do any of you think these sheets will work as far as lowering the sound so the neighbors wouldn't get pissed at night? We are just looking for somewhere we can plug in and jam. And have good enough sound quality to record parts as wanted.
Ibanez K-5 Fieldy Signature
Ernie Ball SUB Series Sterling Stingray 4
Yorkville XC115 Bass Cab(w/head)

"It's better to burn out than fade away"
-Neil Young/Kurt Cobain
#8
This should answer all your questions about the Audimute sheets:

http://www.gearslutz.com/board/bass-traps-acoustic-panels-foam-etc/376014-audimute-block-sound-not-acoustics.html

You need mass to create isolation. All that those are going to do is mitigate high frequencies. The low mids and low end are the frequencies you want to be blocking out, as they're the ones that will pass through walls freely.

Also, their video cracks me up:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCOYjqOGVyc#t=70

"Absorption sheets do not control low frequencies, but the good news is that these aren't usually what bothers neighbors, anyway."
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#9
Whow.....

Let's start with "It depends on how picky your neighbours are at which hours."

If you really want something the neighbours won't hear, it is going to be expensive. Given the size of your room only being 7' wide, I'd look at building a room for the shed to go in. Your "room within a room" will be the shed inside a larger structure.

Looking first at floors.... the sound will travel along the wooden floor to the perimeter of the shed and straight to the outside, the same way sound travels along a string from one tin can to the next. It won't matter a lick what you have on the walls or ceiling with a direct line to the outside along the floor.

You need to isolate the inside from the outside, which is akin to breaking the string between the two tin cans.

Here is a blog I wrote on the topic not too long ago.

http://greenroommusicblog.blogspot.ca/2013/05/sound-proofing-and-sound-treatment.html

Near the bottom of that blog, I have recommended what may be the two best single sources on the planet on this subject.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by FedEx8
Main goal is to turn my friends shed into a room where we can jam, hopefully at late hours, and not cause a noise disturbance to anyone around.
and also get good quality sound for recording instruments separately unless going straight through. So really just kill as much sound as possible while keep quality, yes i know sound proofing is a messy and hard/impossible thing to do.

-Me and a buddy are working on a room in his shed, the room is about 15x7 ft.

- All the walls are insulated with normal pink house fiber glass, we are putting up wooden walls over it currently. After that we plan to put maybe 10 audimute sheets hung up around all the walls as possible. Does anyone know anything about these sheets? the reviews seem good and videos prove them to be good. We are hoping all this will be able to sound proof the room as much as possible, and still be able to play at late hours without the neighbors hearing it.

-The roof has the same insulation and we are putting a thick layer of carpet padding to help the sound from not going through. We will probably end up tacking a sheet to the ceiling to make it better to the eye. There is also a area where we had to add a new strip and it doesn't match evenly.

-Floor, we aren't sure about, its just normal pieces off wood. So do we want the wood surface and carpet under things where necessary like drums, amps(which we also hope to lift on another absorbing material), desk, etc. Or we have normal house carpet we could put down all over. Any suggestions?

-Vocals, we were thinking just use a corner and make a booth with the sound sheets and that will give good enough quality and sound proof, but of course we would experiment all over the place as time goes by.

-A/C Here is a bit of a problem.. we are thinking we will just leave one spot open to instal a window unit when possible. And deal with either turning it on and off for recording, and just jam with it on, or what.

Looking to record a full band in there, not exactly live, but still be able to jam all day and possibly at night at decent volumes. Debating electric or acoustic drums, both are an option at hand. We'd all also be able to mic and use headphones or even plug straight in maybe.

Sorry to go through everything with so much, I just hope what i have plan is the right idea and will work for my needs. Any advice or comments would be amazing! Thanks ahead of time!


A sound proof room for jamming and playing is completely different to an acoustically treated room for recording. A recording room shouldnt be 100% insulated on every wall otherwise you will kill alot of frequencies which are important to listen out for when recording.

Theres a good book I am reading and I also just recomended it to another guy on the forum. Its called "Mixing secrets of the small studio by Mike Senior"

It talks a lot about treating rooms for recording

/Dave