#1
Hi guys,

I've got a Blackstar ID60 with 2 outputs (a 4ohm minimum) I've got a Blackstar 4x12 but it's too heavy and large to get into the studios so currently just using it for gigging.

I'm gonna need a 1x12 or 2x12 with a 4ohm input or something that'll give me the full 60w's from the head (I'm not too great with this whole impedance buggery)

If someone could shun me in the correct direction it would be most obliged!
#3
Pretty much I think it means you need to have a cab of 4 Ohm rating or above. As far as I know, 4 Ohms is the lowest rating for cabinets so anything should be fine (I think, don't quote me on that)
Also, before you even ask for a suggestion of what cab to get, maybe look to getting a Harley Benton 212, low priced with good speakers.
#4
How are you finding the amp?
I've been toying around with getting the combo for when I can't use someone else's cab live as cant lug mine around due to car size.
And I think they would be good for covers as very versatile. Loved it in the shop but how does it hold up after the honeymoon period is over?
Gear:

Gibson lpj
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Epiphone Les Paul 1960's Tribute Plus
Schecter s-1
Marshall JCM900 100WATT HEAD
Fender mustang 1
Dunlop Crybaby
Danelectro Distortion
Tanglewood exotic electro acoustic
Westfield Bass
#5
2 Jack outputs
60 watts RMS
4 ohm minimum

(So I don't wanna go into an 8ohm and get 30 watts, if you understand?
#6
They're incredible - if you're going for an amp head go for the 100w - 60w lacks the power really.
#7
Quote by jackrmesser
2 Jack outputs
60 watts RMS
4 ohm minimum

(So I don't wanna go into an 8ohm and get 30 watts, if you understand?

Going into the 8 ohm jack doesn't mean you cut the watts in half. The watts will always be 60. I'm realizing this is a solid state amp? I think it is just saying the minimum of the cab needs to be 4 ohm.

This is a fairly fail safe rule to follow:


For Tube amps:
Amp Head Ohms > Cab Ohms = Possible blown Power Valves and/or Output Transformer.
Amp Head Ohms < Cab Ohms = Strain on the Output Transformer, Power loss.
*Some amps can take a 1 step mismatch but not all.

For Solid State Amps:
Amp Head Ohms > Cab Ohms = Broken amp
Amp Head Ohms < Cab Ohms = Power change, no strain


Bottom line, if you are looking for a speaker cabinet then you want to find either a 4 or 8 ohm cab and you want it to be able to handle at least 60 watts.
#8
Quote by jackrmesser
Hi guys,

I've got a Blackstar ID60 with 2 outputs (a 4ohm minimum) I've got a Blackstar 4x12 but it's too heavy and large to get into the studios so currently just using it for gigging.

I'm gonna need a 1x12 or 2x12 with a 4ohm input or something that'll give me the full 60w's from the head (I'm not too great with this whole impedance buggery)

If someone could shun me in the correct direction it would be most obliged!


i looked up the manual, i see no reference to this thing having any tubes in it at all. so this means there should be no output transformer.

i also see no reference as to what the amp's output is at higher impedance loads. usually with solid state amps (as you mention) the higher the impedance the less output you get.

as it is very hard to find a single 4 ohm guitar speaker you would probably need to settle for a 2x12 with two 8 ohm speakers wired in parallel. this would supply a 4 ohm load.

i am a little puzzled though. if this smaller cab is for studio work then why are you concerned about getting 'all the watts' outta the amp. since guitar output can be so high (sometimes as much as 120+ dB) you end up limiting your choice of microphones (cuz all mics aren't rated for that high of volume). guitarists/engineers are known to commonly use techniques that make the guitar amp quieter while getting desired tones in the studio.

if this smaller cab is for the studio then why do you want the amp's max output? also if you want to use the amp in the studio have you considered using the emulated speaker out or the USB connectivity? these are all tools for studio use.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Sep 5, 2013,
#9
Quote by gumbilicious
i looked up the manual, i see no reference to this thing having any tubes in it at all. so this means there should be no output transformer.

i also see no reference as to what the amp's output is at higher impedance loads. usually with solid state amps (as you mention) the higher the impedance the less output you get.

as it is very hard to find a single 4 ohm guitar speaker you would probably need to settle for a 2x12 with two 8 ohm speakers wired in parallel. this would supply a 4 ohm load.

i am a little puzzled though. if this smaller cab is for studio work then why are you concerned about getting 'all the watts' outta the amp. since guitar output can be so high (sometimes as much as 120+ dB) you end up limiting your choice of microphones (cuz all mics aren't rated for that high of volume). guitarists/engineers are known to commonly use techniques that make the guitar amp quieter while getting desired tones in the studio.

if this smaller cab is for the studio then why do you want the amp's max output? also if you want to use the amp in the studio have you considered using the emulated speaker out or the USB connectivity? these are all tools for studio use.


Understood, it's generally just so I can transport it with ease to practises and small shows.
Struggling to find a 2x12 or 1x12 with 2 8ohm speakers. Don't suppose you or anyone else could sugguest a 2x12/1x12 with the 8ohm speakers?