#1
A couple of years ago I bought an M-Audio Fast Track Pro guitar interface. I never used because the delay / lag between what you play and what you hear was too off-putting, even though it was just 0.1 second or less.

The only way around this was to record the track 'clean' (direct through), so there was no delay for processing amp effects. This was no good for playing metal. To play properly I need to hear the crunch and growl of the guitar.

Recently I had the idea of splitting the signal from the guitar in two: one to my amp, the other to the interface. This way I could get a metal sound with no delay while the interface happily records (muted, so you don't hear the echo).

I tried it for the first time yesterday and it worked.

To split the signal I got my employee (an electronics guy) to solder up a guitar lead out of a couple of old ones.

I'm posting this because I don't think I can be the only person who's had this annoyance with interfaces.
#2
I just set my buffer low enough that I don't get noticeable lag, and if that doesn't work I suck it up and just play without amp sims (You should be able to play without distortion, if you can't that's a major flaw in your abilities as a guitarist regardless of genre)
#3
Quote by chatterbox272
I just set my buffer low enough that I don't get noticeable lag, and if that doesn't work I suck it up and just play without amp sims (You should be able to play without distortion, if you can't that's a major flaw in your abilities as a guitarist regardless of genre)


I want to hear the guitar similar to how it will sound on the track. I don't enjoy playing a tinny, pipsqueak rendition where you have to guess muting, attack, and so on. That's not really about ability, it's comfort, convenience and preference.

I only accept new technology when it's actually better than what has gone before. I'm used to miking up an amp and recording on a 4-track, where at least I get the benefit of hearing the track properly. I wouldn't change to an interface if it meant sacrificing this.
#4
Quote by Jehannum
I want to hear the guitar similar to how it will sound on the track. I don't enjoy playing a tinny, pipsqueak rendition where you have to guess muting, attack, and so on. That's not really about ability, it's comfort, convenience and preference.

I only accept new technology when it's actually better than what has gone before. I'm used to miking up an amp and recording on a 4-track, where at least I get the benefit of hearing the track properly. I wouldn't change to an interface if it meant sacrificing this.

It doesn't, you get an interface, plug your mic in and do the exact same thing you always did. Or you get an interface that is capable of keeping up with the amount of lag you can handle.

An interface simply provides the option to go DI and use simulators, it doesn't force them on you. If you like using a real amp and mic then you can still do that with an interface (if yours can't use both XLR and Jack inputs, then it's a shit interface and no-wonder it can't keep up with low latencies).
#6
Quote by BananaJoe
get asio4all, it should reduce your latency

^^This.

Unless you have a really crap computer, you shouldn't get lag with a DAW. I have a 5 year old laptop that was crap 5 years ago that can do one track without lag or distortion with multiple effects running. My desktop can do several tracks with effects running and not bog.

I would say work on your settings.