#1
So here's the complex, I've got a Conrad LP '70s Lawsuit era guitar, on which one screw hole on the pickup ring looks like it's been drilled out, and the wood in the pickup pit has been almost totally splintered on 2 screw holes, and its happening quickly to the other ones. I've searched for solutions, but they can't fix this problem. I've thought that maybe I should cut away the lip for the screws and cut a rectangular piece of wood and glue it in the pickup hole to substitute for the wood lip. Though I don't know if this would actually cause more damage than it would solve. I can get a photo, but I can't think of any other solution. If anyone knows anything, be it professional or a DIY solution, I would be extremely thankful. I have to do it to both pickup holes, and both are humbuckers. Replacing the pickup rings is one part of my solution, I've got an over sized screw holding the pickup down, and I don't think that did any good, as I heard some pretty wicked cracking when I screwed it in, though I was mindful of over torquing it and stopped when I could no longer turn the screw with two fingers. I'll try to get a photo thrown up, soon. The sooner I can get this fixed, the better. Though it's not make it, or break it, I've got another guitar on the way, and this one was due to be retired, anyway. She's old, and she's given a lot more than I thought she would, even still I would like to repair her, even if she's no longer going to be my number one. Thank you, to anyone that helps!
#2
Here's the photo's. You can't really see it, but the neck pickup has a crack through the wood on two screw holes, and has also been stripped out. I think I'm going to cut some small rectangular shims of wood to take the place of them, and glue them in to drive the screws in to.



The last one is of the mounting ring with the drilled out hole. I had a 1/2" screw holding it in with a 1/3 centimeter head on it... was bad, plus it had to be torqued too much to stay in. Looking to find some white rings and age them, or maybe find some already aged. But I do need to know if my solution is going to be good for the guitar and be the cheapest most practical route possible.
#3
Best thing is to route away the sides of the pickup pockets and glue in two new pieces of wood. You can see the wear from the mounting rings; that will be your boundary. Since the guitar is black you can do a quick finish job on the new bits if they are visible after the rings are put back on.
#4
Quote by Invader Jim
Best thing is to route away the sides of the pickup pockets and glue in two new pieces of wood. You can see the wear from the mounting rings; that will be your boundary. Since the guitar is black you can do a quick finish job on the new bits if they are visible after the rings are put back on.

Awesome, so I was right about just inserting new bits? Thank you so much for the help. You can't imagine how much it means to me. My Conrad is my baby and she's been abused so much. You have my humble gratitude and thanks.
#5
How long are the screws? Instead of removing any material and potentially damaging the finish, you could trying gluing some very small blocks under the lip... just to give something for the screws to bite into. Definitely replace those pickup rings too..

I realise this is basically what you were considering anyway, and I'm guessing from the photos that the pickup rout is actually rectangular under that lip.
#6
Quote by -MintSauce-
How long are the screws? Instead of removing any material and potentially damaging the finish, you could trying gluing some very small blocks under the lip... just to give something for the screws to bite into. Definitely replace those pickup rings too..

I realise this is basically what you were considering anyway, and I'm guessing from the photos that the pickup rout is actually rectangular under that lip.

Yes the actual pickup pocket is rectangular. the screws are 3/4". Adding a new bit under the lip actually defeats the purpose of avoiding further damage as most of the screw holes are dried out and splintering, anyway. So it would actually benefit me more to remove them, as they are already starting to crack the paint and finish. Not sure if that's visible in the photo's. At any rate, it's more practical to replace the whole thing which would be a more long term solution rather than take the time to try and repair the splintered and broken holes, as well as the ones that are still function-able.
Last edited by NexAtrum at Sep 7, 2013,