#1
Hi.

The intonation on the G-string of my guitar is a bit sharp. I moved the saddle all the way towards the tailpiece, and it's still sharp. Someone told me to remove the saddle and reverse it. However, I don't know how. I removed the bridge, but I don't understand how I'm supposed to remove the saddle. I tried unscrew it, but nothings happening. Help!
#3
That's odd. It should just come out if you unscrew it enough. is there a retaining wire on the front of the bridge? You need to push the wire over the screw to take the saddle out.
Quote by Roc8995
Just turn the whole bridge around. Some saddles aren't removable.

If it's set the way a typical TOM is set up, that won't fix it. If you flip it over, the saddle for the G string will still face the wrong way.



See?
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Sep 8, 2013,
#4
Yeah, I don't think the saddles are removable. Why, I wonder. Well, I'll try turning the whole bridge around.
#5
Okay, so I turned the bridge around. I think it worked. If I play the 12th string harmonic it is the same as the 12th fret, but if I play for example the 9th fret on the G-string, the note is a bit sharp (says my tuner), but I can't hear a difference. Problem solved, I guess. Thanks a lot for the help.
#6
Good!
TOODEEPBLUE, there's no wrong way for a saddle, often side gives you slightly more room for intonation than the other. Not a lot of bridges have the three reversed saddles like the one you posted. So flipping the bridge can work.
#7
Quote by Roc8995
Good!
TOODEEPBLUE, there's no wrong way for a saddle, often side gives you slightly more room for intonation than the other. Not a lot of bridges have the three reversed saddles like the one you posted. So flipping the bridge can work.

I thought the chamfered saddles on TOM's was the most common type
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#8
Maybe they are, guess I don't pay much attention. I know Gotoh bridges aren't, and I'm reasonably sure that the stock Gibson ones weren't until they started using the symmetrical saddles, but you could be right. I don't know which is more popular.
#9
Before you flip the saddle measure the length of the scale from the nut to the saddle to be sure that it actually needs the extra room. The G string shouldn’t need the saddle flipped unless the bridge is in the wrong place. And if the bridge is in the wrong place you should have noticed problems on all the strings. It’s more likely that this is just a bad string.