#1
The more I transcribe the more I realize that a lot of the stuff I've been told by various musicians over the years has been incorrect. For example,

- 90% of popular music is three chords and usually I - IV - V
- 90% of popular music resolves to the V chord
- 90% of popular music is directly influenced by (or not possible without) the blues

I'm on a heavy transcribing kick as I'm trying to improve my knowledge of what I'm actually playing. Songs by Calexico, Jethro Tull, Neil Young, Friends of Dean Martinez, The Bee Gees, Uriah Heep, Chris Isaak. I already have the chord charts to the various bands and music projects I've been in ranging from progressive to spaghetti westernish to boleros and Mexican folk tunes. There is not a single song that I've analyzed that fits any of the points above. Maybe there could be an argument for the influence of the blues, but it'd be a stretch and highly debatable.

Are the "myths" above not actually myths and I'm just not into the vast majority of popular music?
Last edited by Sabicas at Sep 9, 2013,
#2
This is referring to pop music on the radio and stuff, catchy music, not progressive, classical or spanish, though there are quite a few cowboys songs that use the same old progressions.

I've never heard that thing regarding the blues, maybe 90% of rock and roll, but the blues, idk about that. Maybe if you really wanna go back and pick the sliiiightest little inspirations, but really, never heard that.
#4
I can't comment on specific percentages. It's kind of silly to make up percentages, but there is truth to a great deal of those things you mentioned.

I IV V are extremely important in music. While it is incorrect to say that 90% of music is made up of these three chords, these three chords could be used to harmonize nearly any melody, hence the popularity of those three chords. It's a common cliché in country music that all you need is three chords and the truth. Those three chords are I IV V. It is very likely that all the bands you have mentioned use I IV V in some variation at some point in their musical library.

Music rarely if ever resolves to the V chord.
Music tends to resolve to the I chord. The V chord is the tension chord that is resolved by the I chord. The most popular cadence is V-I. This is most definitely not a myth. Though to be fair in popular music bVII-I and IV-I are also very popular resolutions. To loosely paraphrase a famous musician whose name currently escapes me, all music is simply an exploration of V-I. And I agree. The dominant tonic relationship is at the heart of music. I don't have any examples but I guarantee you that all the artists you mentioned use the V-I resolution in some of their songs.

90% of popular music is directly influenced by the blues...Again it's a dubious practice to claim percentages. The Blues has been extremely influential in popular music. If you removed the Blues entirely from western musical history then without a doubt the music scene today would be radically different than it is now. The influence is not always direct but its like saying your great great grandfather influenced who you are today. While he most likely didn't have a direct influence on your life - without him you would not exist. Similarly if you look at popular music today and look at it's influences, then look at what influenced them etc you are likely to have the Blues in there somewhere.
Neil Young for example idolized Elvis Presley. Elvis sang a number of blues songs and was heavily influenced by the blues.
Jethro Tull started off with blues rock, The BeeGees were also influenced by Elvis and the Beatles (both of whom have strong blues influences)
Si
#5
Quote by 20Tigers
I can't comment on specific percentages. It's kind of silly to make up percentages, but there is truth to a great deal of those things you mentioned.

I IV V are extremely important in music. While it is incorrect to say that 90% of music is made up of these three chords, these three chords could be used to harmonize nearly any melody, hence the popularity of those three chords. It's a common cliché in country music that all you need is three chords and the truth. Those three chords are I IV V.

Music rarely if ever resolves to the V chord.
Music tends to resolve to the I chord. The V chord is the tension chord that is resolved by the I chord. The most popular cadence is V-I. This is most definitely not a myth. Though to be fair in popular music bVII-I and IV-I are also very popular resolutions. To loosely paraphrase a famous musician whose name currently escapes me, all music is simply an exploration of V-I. And I agree. The dominant tonic relationship is at the heart of music.

90% of popular music is directly influenced by the blues...Again it's a dubious practice to claim percentages. The Blues has been extremely influential in popular music. If you removed the Blues entirely from western musical history then without a doubt the music scene today would be radically different than it is now. The influence is not always direct but its like saying your great great grandfather influenced who you are today. While he most likely didn't have a direct influence on your life - without him you would not exist. Similarly if you look at popular music today and look at it's influences, then look at what influenced them etc you are likely to have the Blues in there somewhere.
Neil Young for example idolized Elvis Presley. Elvis sang a number of blues songs and was heavily influenced by the blues.


I was using arbitrary percentages when I probably should have just written "the majority".

I'm not ignorant to the history of the blues and it's influence, but I always tend to favor the songs from blues-influenced artists that don't have strong (if any) blues influence. The tune by Neil Young that I learned was the main theme to the soundtrack, "Dead Man". I don't hear any blues nor do I hear any Elvis. I was also thinking of my favorite Beatles and Stones Tunes, "A Day in the Life" and "Paint It Black" and not hearing any blues at all. I'd say the vast majority of Tull (after the first 3-4 albums) have very little to zero blues. I can't even think of any Bee Gees at all that is even the slightest bit bluesy and I'm not just talking about the disco comeback years.

This is not an argument for me, just feeling like I'm missing something.
Last edited by Sabicas at Sep 9, 2013,
#6
Quote by Reages
Because non of the artists you mentioned are popular music.


Really? Bee Gees? Jethro Tull? Neil Young? Chris Isaak? While not diva/boy band/superbowl pop, I'd put them under the category of "popular music" even if their heydey is well past.
#7
So about the I-IV-V thing, see vi is the relative minor of I, ii, is the relative minor of IV, and iii the relative minor of V, so what your doing is using a chord that is harmonically related to I IV or V so as long as you stay in one key, and don't heavily borrow chords or use chromatic progressions, you are using a I-IV-V progression, then likewise if you use harmonic minor it just means that you five chord will be major, and if you use melodic minor, you can simple change around the major/minor of the IV and V chords, for example a common melodic minor progression would be vi, V, IV, III (a Spanish cadenza which is frequently the progression used for flamenco) and then you see that the relative major of vi is I so what you have is a I-IV-V progression with an occasionally raised 7th in order to produce a leading tone to pull harder to the vii chord. then likewise modal chord progressions simple resolve to something other than I/vi
Last edited by Bad Kharmel at Sep 9, 2013,
#8
Quote by Sabicas
Really? Bee Gees? Jethro Tull? Neil Young? Chris Isaak? While not diva/boy band/superbowl pop, I'd put them under the category of "popular music" even if their heydey is well past.

While those artist are certainly popular, I wouldn't consider them the epitome of what is considered pop music, especially today. The I IV V thing is true a lot of the time. I think what is meant by the "90%" thing people say is simply the a very large amount of songs that exist are I IV V, which I would agree with. For pete sake, the original Spiderman theme song is a classic blues I IV V.

Also, to be fair, "A Day In The Life" and "Paint It Black" are two fairly obscure songs by the Beatles and Rolling Stones in comparison to the bulk of their work. (This statement holds more so true for the Stones than the Beatles, since the Beatles were all over the map as far as styles and writing, but still.) I mean, Honky Tonk Women, Can't You Hear Me Knockin', Love Me Do, Get Back and songs such as those is where you hear the vast majority of your "blues" influences, and they're not really "direct" as you stated.

Idk where the resolving V chord thing came from, someone must've misinformed you, because I agree with 20Tigers, most songs resolve to the I chord. The leading tone sets up for this and the song can sound incomplete if you don't resolve to it.

Now I do agree with blues influencing most popular music, but I don't think it's quite as direct as you're thinking. Anytime you hear a guitarist bend a string, that is a blues thing. Now to head off anyone flipping out on me, I totally realize that bending strings was around before the blues cats, I'm just saying that that is a tactic that is most commonly employed and made popular by blues players. I believe stuff like that is what people are referring to when they say most pop music is influenced by blues. I don't think they mean that it sounds very similar to Robert Johnson or BB King, lol.

But all of this is just my opinion, take it for what it's worth. I just think you may be over analyzing the generalizations a little bit.
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#9
what 20tigers said.

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#10
I wouldn't say most popular music is I - IV - V. OK, most popular music uses those chords but not in that order and there are usually more chords used than just those three. Also, most pop songs I hear have a IV chord before the I chord and not a V chord before it. IV-I seems more usual in pop than V-I (for example the most common pop progression I-V-vi-IV or the "AC/DC progression" I-bVII-IV).

Quote by Bad Kharmel
So about the I-IV-V thing, see vi is the relative minor of I, ii, is the relative minor of IV, and iii the relative minor of V, so what your doing is using a chord that is harmonically related to I IV or V so as long as you stay in one key, and don't heavily borrow chords or use chromatic progressions, you are using a I-IV-V progression, then likewise if you use harmonic minor it just means that you five chord will be major, and if you use melodic minor, you can simple change around the major/minor of the IV and V chords, for example a common melodic minor progression would be vi, V, IV, III (a Spanish cadenza which is frequently the progression used for flamenco) and then you see that the relative major of vi is I so what you have is a I-IV-V progression with an occasionally raised 7th in order to produce a leading tone to pull harder to the vii chord. then likewise modal chord progressions simple resolve to something other than I/vi

You need to remember that minor key is more than just major starting on the 6th note. So that vi-V-IV-III should be i-VII-VI-V. It's in a minor key, not in a major key. And I would say it's really close to i-iv-V in minor.

Tonic is always the key center. So you really don't resolve to vi chord, you resolve to i chord if it's a minor song.
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#11
Paint It Black has some blues influences. In particular the lyrical structure is blues influenced. Its not a direct copy of standard blues lyrical form but the influence is there.

Blues tends to have a repeated line with a turnaround:
There's a Red House over yonder, that's where my baby stays.
There's a Red House over yonder, that's where my baby stays.
I aint been home to see my baby, In 99 and one half days

Note also that there is no real verse chorus structure in the blues. It is instead made up of a repeating 12* bar structure that is played over and over again for however many verses are needed to sing the song.

A slight variation on the blues lyrical structure is to replace the repeated second line with an original line so that it is still reiterating the melody and mirroring the lyrical intention of the first line but wording it in a different way.

I see a red door and I want it painted black.
No colours anymore I want them to turn black

The progression here is harmonically static only to be followed by a dynamic harmony that provides forward momentum before resolving back to the start and repeating the same 16 bar progression. Similar (but not the same) as the blues.

Another similarity this song shares with more standard blues numbers is the subject matter. The lyrical message is pretty much stock standard for the blues.

The Beatles like mentioned earlier did a number of blues numbers. They were such talented songwriters though and though heavily influenced by the blues they also had a huge range of other influences. They had extremely fertile creative minds and were very experimental. Not every song is going to be a 12 bar blues but the influences are there.
Si
#12
Quote by Sabicas
- 90% of popular music is three chords and usually I - IV - V

When it comes to pop music and rock music, that's definitely one of the more common progressions. A lot of bands use alternate progressions, of course, but that is definitely a popular one.

- 90% of popular music resolves to the V chord

I wouldn't say "resolves", because (to me) that implies that a progression is "at home" (or hits the I chord). However, a lot of popular music does use the Half Cadence (which means that the progression/riff ends on the V chord). This is because a Half Cadence wants to naturally push back to the I chord, making it VERY easy to have a repeating progression/riff.

In fact, if you played a progression that was I - IV - V or (i - iv - v in a minor key), you'll notice that it really, really, really (lots of "really"s) wants to keep repeating itself. There's ALWAYS a push towards the tonic. As 20Tigers said, it's also easy to harmonize these chords, which makes writing vocal lines fairly easy.

- 90% of popular music is directly influenced by (or not possible without) the blues

That's because a lot of early rock guitarists were influenced directly by blues musicians, which of course meant all the pop guitarists of the time were directly or indirectly influenced by the blues. Hell, even today, a lot of musicians still use the major/minor pentatonic or the blues scale. (Examples: Wolfmother, the blues influence is all over every song; Them Crooked Vultures, same thing. Loads of other bands.)
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 9, 2013,
#13
rush makes a pretty great goddamn living, that doesn't mean they're not prog

but yeah dont worry so much about what them ****** got to say, you just do you lil homie
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#14
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rush makes a pretty great goddamn living, that doesn't mean they're not prog

but yeah dont worry so much about what them ****** got to say, you just do you lil homie

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#15
I would actually like to hear a few examples of pop songs that mainly use I-IV-V progression. Because IMO that's not a very usual progression in pop - I mean, in pop music you usually have a bit more chords in the progression or they are in a different order. At least that's how modern pop is, don't know about some 50s/60s pop music. But I want to hear some examples. Because I can't think of any pop song with that chord progression. OK, one comes to my mind and it's "Wild Thing" but that's actually I-IV-V-IV.
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#16
Yeah I think you're right as far as pop music goes the IV chord seems to precede the I chord the most often these days. Often the V chord is still there but it seems that typically instead of starting on the tonic and building to the dominant before resolving back that pop music tends to jump straight to the V and then unwind to the tonic. - if it uses the V chord at all.

I can only think of one song that briefly uses the IV V I and that's only for a line or two in the chorus - Bruno Mars - When I Was Your Man. He can be pretty good with his chords, old Bruno Mars, and he is magic with melody- a very talented songwriter.
Si
#17
^ So actually what you are saying is that myth #1 is totally busted. I would say that it's uncommon to use only three chords in a pop song. 20t also busted the second myth - most of the time V chord is not the last chord before the tonic (if that was what TS meant). Third myth is right - no blues, no pop.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Sep 11, 2013,
#18
Ok, after thinking on it a while I agree that #3 is not a myth. I've just come to the realization that most of the music that I love (and consider "popular") happens to be the mostly non blues-based stuff. For example, my fav Zeppelin songs are distinctly NOT blues-based. The obvious blues numbers are usually my least favorite. I've just never quite faced up to maybe I don't like the blues that much, despite being a huge Sabbath fan. Even some of the early blues recordings that I love are not typical of the blues to my ears.....Skip James.

However, I don't think "Paint It Black" is obscure at all, even in the context of the Stones catalog as it was the big hit for them on that particular LP (forget the name, "aftermath"?) and it's on their greatest hits collection, they play it in concert to this day, etc. It happens to be an odd duck in the Stones repertoire, stylistically. "A Day In the Life" is from one of the most significant albums in rock history and many consider it the "blow your mind" masterpiece of Beatles studio wizardry. Probably the most influential track on their most influential LP has no blues elements. That's why I used it as an example. I also don't think the AAB style of verse that 20Tigers is crediting to blues is all that solid of a connection. Paint it black has the same melody for the first two lines of the verse but the second line varies and there is no "B" that is anywhere near the "B" of Red House. It goes somewhere else after AA.

Maybe I'm wrong on that point but I often feel that, though blues deserves a plenty of credit, it often comes at the discredit of all that came before it that was actually absorbed into the blues rather than being invented by it. The guitar and it's predecessors are obviously much older than the blues and so is the technique of string bending to match a vocal nuance (Sitar, anyone?). I've even read and heard people say that using a slide was invented by blues musicians, which is completely incorrect (see Hindustani and Carnatic). Blues musicians may have made those realizations in isolation from others that did it before them, but please don't credit them with the origin of something that was happening centuries before.

In some of it's forms, Flamenco employs a AAB verse despite having an older history and complete isolation from the cultures that formed the blues. Indian music is also thought to be the most significant root of the flamenco recipe. Paint it Black has a distinct eastern-ish melody and even employs an electric sitar. So, how is that song blues influenced again? Because the band that wrote it also plays and writes blues-based rock? I think there's a western or even American-centric view at play in most histories of modern popular music and Paint it Black is a perfect example of that. People will try to find a connection with the blues instead of listening objectively for whatever naturally surfaces.
Last edited by Sabicas at Sep 11, 2013,
#19
Quote by Sabicas
I also don't think the AAB style of verse that 20Tigers is crediting to blues is all that solid of a connection. Paint it black has the same melody for the first two lines of the verse but the second line varies and there is no "B" that is anywhere near the "B" of Red House. It goes somewhere else after AA.


So, how is that song blues influenced again? Because the band that wrote it also plays and writes blues-based rock? I think there's a western or even American-centric view at play in most histories of modern popular music and Paint it Black is a perfect example of that. People will try to find a connection with the blues instead of listening objectively for whatever naturally surfaces.
I agree that Paint it Black is not an obscure Rolling Stones song at all. A Day in the Life is also not an obscure Beatles song.

For You Blue is a more obscure Beatles song. But don't bother searching that one out, you won't like it since you have decided you don't like the blues. But before you get offended by that last sentence it is really just a cheeky way of turning your accusation around on you. One could say that you are denying a connection that is there because you don't want to hear it in the same way you accuse them of trying to find a connection because they want to hear it.

I used a poor example to explain the connection clearly, so Ill try to do a better job here. If you still don't see it then that's no big deal, you don't see it. But I feel my explanation of what I hear as blues influences did not really get down to it so I'm going to do it again more comprehensively.

Blues songs don't ALWAYs repeat the first line twice and follow up with a third line. It is the most common blues format but not the only way the blues is played. A natural variation on this is to vary the first two lines so that you have two distinct lines the second developing the first. Then in 12 bar format you would follow up with a third line which would be a turnaround. Of course then there are blues songs that are much looser in regard to lyrical structure.

Trying to stay on point though, there are not only 12 bar blues numbers. There are also eight bar blues and 16 bar blues as well (even 32 bar blues).

In 16 bar blues there are four extra bars, this can be achieved in a number of ways. Sometimes by repeating the first four bars twice, sometimes by repeating the middle four bars, another way would be by repeating the last four bars of the piece. This last way would result, lyrically, in either in a repeat of the turnaround, a development of the turnaround in the way of a second line, or an instrumental turnaround.

This is pretty much the way I see these lyrics going here. The second line is pretty much a reiteration of the first line. Following from this is a two line turnaround. It's not as "witty" as Red House and that was a bad example but not all blues is like that, sometimes the "turnaround" is a morose but more emphatic development of the earlier statements which turns back to the start of the next verse.

Apart from the lyrical structure which I very much see as blues influenced. There is also the song structure and the lyrical subject matter.

Lyrically the message of this song is very blue. The singer is pretty gloomy.

The song's form is also very similar to that found in the blues. Though it uses different chords that are not typical of a standard blues number it follows a 16 bar repeating pattern just like a 16 bar blues number would. It starts with 8 bars of reasonably static harmony followed by 8 bars of a more dynamic harmony that ends with a lead in to a repeat of the same 16 bars. There is no chorus or middle 8 like you would find in most pop or rock songs.

Now sure these same influences in regard to lyrical structure, song form, and lyrical meaning can be found in other sources other than blues but when a band releases three albums of material that is rife with heavy blues influences throughout it seems pretty silly to bury one's head in the sand and say these similarities are from Flamenco or Indian music. It's an evolution of the blues lyrical subject, structures, and song form that they were very well versed in.

Blues players learned the blues from other players and then developed the style adding their own touches, varying the structure, trying new chords, more bars, varying the verses etc etc. Blues is not in a clearly defined box - in the box is blues out of the box is not blues. It is a more fluid thing.

The Rolling Stones pretty much play pretty standard blues rock up to this point. But as they develop they are naturally going to start trying new things, different structures, different instruments etc. They don't lose the blues influence though, its still there - its just evolving.

Im not denying other influences are evident in the song. I'm just acknowledging that I hear the blues as a strong influence in Paint It Black and trying to justify/explain what I hear.

It's an influence similar to the way that Jimmy Hendrix and Little Wing is an influence in the song Under the Bridge by the RHCP. I loved both of those songs and never put them together until the connection was pointed out and explained to me. It's not a glaringly obvious influence but it is definitely there.
Si
#20
Quote by 20Tigers
I agree that Paint it Black is not an obscure Rolling Stones song at all. A Day in the Life is also not an obscure Beatles song.

For You Blue is a more obscure Beatles song. But don't bother searching that one out, you won't like it since you have decided you don't like the blues. But before you get offended by that last sentence it is really just a cheeky way of turning your accusation around on you. One could say that you are denying a connection that is there because you don't want to hear it in the same way you accuse them of trying to find a connection because they want to hear it.

I used a poor example to explain the connection clearly, so Ill try to do a better job here. If you still don't see it then that's no big deal, you don't see it. But I feel my explanation of what I hear as blues influences did not really get down to it so I'm going to do it again more comprehensively.

Blues songs don't ALWAYs repeat the first line twice and follow up with a third line. It is the most common blues format but not the only way the blues is played. A natural variation on this is to vary the first two lines so that you have two distinct lines the second developing the first. Then in 12 bar format you would follow up with a third line which would be a turnaround. Of course then there are blues songs that are much looser in regard to lyrical structure.

Trying to stay on point though, there are not only 12 bar blues numbers. There are also eight bar blues and 16 bar blues as well (even 32 bar blues).

In 16 bar blues there are four extra bars, this can be achieved in a number of ways. Sometimes by repeating the first four bars twice, sometimes by repeating the middle four bars, another way would be by repeating the last four bars of the piece. This last way would result, lyrically, in either in a repeat of the turnaround, a development of the turnaround in the way of a second line, or an instrumental turnaround.

This is pretty much the way I see these lyrics going here. The second line is pretty much a reiteration of the first line. Following from this is a two line turnaround. It's not as "witty" as Red House and that was a bad example but not all blues is like that, sometimes the "turnaround" is a morose but more emphatic development of the earlier statements which turns back to the start of the next verse.

Apart from the lyrical structure which I very much see as blues influenced. There is also the song structure and the lyrical subject matter.

Lyrically the message of this song is very blue. The singer is pretty gloomy.

The song's form is also very similar to that found in the blues. Though it uses different chords that are not typical of a standard blues number it follows a 16 bar repeating pattern just like a 16 bar blues number would. It starts with 8 bars of reasonably static harmony followed by 8 bars of a more dynamic harmony that ends with a lead in to a repeat of the same 16 bars. There is no chorus or middle 8 like you would find in most pop or rock songs.

Now sure these same influences in regard to lyrical structure, song form, and lyrical meaning can be found in other sources other than blues but when a band releases three albums of material that is rife with heavy blues influences throughout it seems pretty silly to bury one's head in the sand and say these similarities are from Flamenco or Indian music. It's an evolution of the blues lyrical subject, structures, and song form that they were very well versed in.

Blues players learned the blues from other players and then developed the style adding their own touches, varying the structure, trying new chords, more bars, varying the verses etc etc. Blues is not in a clearly defined box - in the box is blues out of the box is not blues. It is a more fluid thing.

The Rolling Stones pretty much play pretty standard blues rock up to this point. But as they develop they are naturally going to start trying new things, different structures, different instruments etc. They don't lose the blues influence though, its still there - its just evolving.

Im not denying other influences are evident in the song. I'm just acknowledging that I hear the blues as a strong influence in Paint It Black and trying to justify/explain what I hear.

It's an influence similar to the way that Jimmy Hendrix and Little Wing is an influence in the song Under the Bridge by the RHCP. I loved both of those songs and never put them together until the connection was pointed out and explained to me. It's not a glaringly obvious influence but it is definitely there.


Good points. I love plenty of blues and blues-influenced music, I just don't think everything is the blues. My knowledge of song structure is pretty weak, I admit. I just don't hear the blues and I looked no further. You've successfully convinced me that there is at least a small bit of blues influence in this song.

However I feel like once you say something like "Lyrically the message of this song is very blue. The singer is pretty gloomy." you are stretching it a bit. Gloomy lyrics abound everywhere and not at all specific to the blues. Yes, it's a trademark of the blues, but so what? Flamenco is full of prisons, drugs and devil-women. Blues parallels can be found in many oppressed cultures. Music should be able to stand alone instead of having historical side-notes pushing us towards conclusions that may not be technically correct. If you had never heard this song and it was performed by another unknown group in exactly the same way, would you still hear the same thing? What if I told you that several of the band members were Spanish gypsies?

I know this doesn't really matter, but I find it interesting.
Last edited by Sabicas at Sep 11, 2013,
#21
The straight up I IV V era was in the 1950s-60s. It's not so common nowadays. I'd say the I V vi IV is just as popular, if not more so, and persists in modern music. I-V is an extremely common launchpad for progressions.

And the progressions don't really "resolve" to V, they end on it, but don't resolve to I. Half cadence.
#22
TS, what do you consider "popular" music? Is it music that sells a lot? I'd say that's pretty popular.

According to http://www.officialcharts.com/chart-news/the-official-top-40-biggest-selling-singles-of-2012-revealed-1784/

The biggest selling songs of 2012 were:
1 SOMEBODY THAT I USED TO KNOW - GOTYE FT KIMBRA
2 CALL ME MAYBE - CARLY RAE JEPSEN
3 WE ARE YOUNG - FUN. FT JANELLE MONAE
4 TITANIUM - DAVID GUETTA FT SIA
5 IMPOSSIBLE - JAMES ARTHUR
6 GANGNAM STYLE - PSY
7 STARSHIPS - NICKI MINAJ
8 DOMINO - JESSIE J
9 PAYPHONE - MAROON 5 FT WIZ KHALIFA
10 WILD ONES - FLO RIDA FT SIA


If your argument is to have any merit - chord chart each of these songs out and explain your findings.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#23
Quote by cdgraves
I'd say the I V vi IV is just as popular, if not more so, and persists in modern music.



This; and more popular.

I actually think that progression has the most number 1 hit song to it.

It's almost as if every year people crave at least 1 song using this.

Not uncommon in pop punk either.

Minor equivalent is also used sometimes, not as much as this one though.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Sep 12, 2013,
#24
Quote by xxdarrenxx


Minor equivalent is also used sometimes, not as much as this one though.


"Say it Ain't So" still gets a fair amount of air play
#25
Quote by Sabicas
...[ ]....I was also thinking of my favorite Beatles and Stones Tunes, "A Day in the Life" and "Paint It Black" and not hearing any blues at all. I'd say the vast majority of Tull (after the first 3-4 albums) have very little to zero blues.
The Stones "Paint it Black", comes closer to a Hebrew Chant than it does the blues. It was just Brian Jones going through one of his "phases". The song uses the harmonic minor scale, and the verse chords are >> i V7. So no major I, a minor instead. The melody centers over the two 1/2 step (minor 2nd) intervals in that scale. (natural 7th to tonic, and 2nd to flat 3rd). That's where it generates the middle eastern, freggish, double harmonic feel, via those intervals.

If you go into the Beatles "Day Tripper", you'll find the bass/lead line is directly from the blues scale, but it doesn't sound like "the blues" either.

Quote by Sabicas
This is not an argument for me, just feeling like I'm missing something.
You are missing something when you try to force the I, IV, V + blues influence on every piece of music you hear. Neil Young is full of shit. He may have listened to Elvis and Blues, but he's a folkie through and through. And, if you listen to his, "Love is a Rose", that is actually an I, IV, V "folk song".

Other pop tunes draw from the "Andalusian Cadence", which uses the Phrygian dominant scale. The chord progression there is i, VIIB7, VI, V or if you prefer most often, Am, G, F, E. Dylan, "One More Cup of Coffee", Dire Straits, "Sultans of Swing", (in Dm though). and "White Rabbit" all pull some of their progressions from there.

Then there's the "turnaround" progressions, which generally start on I, and cycle through several scale degrees, reverse and return to the I. The verses of The Kinks, "Celluloid Heroes", are a stellar example of this, and the "chorus" actually almost does resolve to a "V". (It's C, G, & D, which are the I, IV, V chords of G, played IV, I, V).

The best example of "non blues" I can think of is The Who, "Tommy". Strum along with that, you'll find British martial and ceremonial music, there's a little bit of folk, but most often throughout the duration, it's a straight up march.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 14, 2013,
#26
Quote by Captaincranky
The verses of The Kinks, "Celluloid Heroes", are a stellar example of this, and the "chorus" actually almost does resolve to a "V". (It's C, G, & D, which are the I, IV, V chords of G, played IV, I, V).

That's a bVII-IV-I, not a IV-I-V.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#27
Quote by MaggaraMarine
That's a bVII-IV-I, not a IV-I-V.
I actually thought I did good in charting the chords in the Andalusian Mode. As you well know, I'd normally call E major the "I".

As for the choruses of "Celluloid Heroes", the note "C#" disappears, and I mentally change the key to G. Doubtless you're correct, and the TS probably shouldn't assimilate my muddled thought patterns. But, those choruses do provide a look at a half cadence in G also. (And I did say, "almost").

I would like to know though, if you thought the rest my post was helpful and otherwise correct?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 14, 2013,
#28
Yeah, I think otherwise it was correct.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115