#1
Ok here I go. I started guitar 40 years ago. Didnt play much but always enjoyed playing. Now fast forward to present time. Im 55 and just bought a Epiphone Casino guitar. I love it! I also picked up a Line 6 practice amp. Question: Should I self teach or pay for lessons. I am a quick learn and musically oriented. I dont plan on playing for anyone but myself but want to learn easier songs. Any advise would help. No jokesters ps also big John Lennon fan which helped my decision for a guitar. Thanks
#2
my advise is teach yourself for a few months, get the basics, the muscle strength in your fingers, learn chords, scales etc and a few songs that you want to learn then once you have a grasp of the guitar go to a teacher for a while they will help get rid of any bad habbits you've picked up by teaching yourself and will help you understand how to further your playing.
#3
Quote by mjphoto45
Ok here I go. I started guitar 40 years ago. Didnt play much but always enjoyed playing. Now fast forward to present time. Im 55 and just bought a Epiphone Casino guitar. I love it! I also picked up a Line 6 practice amp. Question: Should I self teach or pay for lessons. I am a quick learn and musically oriented. I dont plan on playing for anyone but myself but want to learn easier songs. Any advise would help. No jokesters ps also big John Lennon fan which helped my decision for a guitar. Thanks


Sounds like you have already 'self-taught' for the last 40 years

A good teacher can show you HOW to continue learning on your own, especially in this computer age with resources like Ultimate-Guitar at your fingertips. He/she will show you technique builders, basic music theory (keys/scales/intervals/chords) and help you interpret the lyric sheets and TABs you can find for free online. As well, a good teacher will show you how to recognize and fix transcription mistakes.

A 'teacher' that doesn't really know what they're doing can not only be a bad investment, but be frustrating and discouraging so start at your local music stores but ask for a complete list of known guitar teachers in your area, not just the ones who teach out of their store. Find one that specializes in adults and the style of music/playing that interests you. Good luck!!
#4
i wouldn't advise self-teaching if you have no other musical experience, but if you do, then it would be worth trying. For example, I taught myself guitar, but I already played piano and drums. I wouldn't have tried to teach myself guitar if I hadn't had proper lessons in those other instruments.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
Honestly I don't think it makes a huge difference. The main things are your attitude, your commitment, and your discipline.

Keep a positive attitude to your practice, your progress, the music and the instrument. Try to adopt a childlike optimism and excitement. Focus on your progress you make, not how much more you have to learn.

Your commitment has to be solid. Keep a regularly scheduled daily practice regime, You have to be prepared to make this time a priority and non-negotiable. I'd suggest an hour a day but even 20 mins of focused practice everyday is better than three hours once a week on a Sunday.


Be disciplined, not just in keeping to your practice but in structuring your practice and sticking to your goals, in developing good habits and clean sounds. If you want to learn a song for example - which is where I would suggest you start - choose a song or two and stick with those songs until you master them - then pick up a new song and stick with it until you master it.

A teacher can help you structure your practice and help you find things to work on but plenty of people got by without a teacher. Including John Lennon.

The toughest thing about learning when you're not a kid or teenager is being positive about it. It's easier for kids to hear themselves play poorly and think they are amazing. As we get older we are more prone to see how much we suck and be discouraged. If you can get enthusiastic about your progress you'll do fine with or without a teacher.
Si
#6
I think it makes a huge difference in time wise. Paying for lessons and practicing with a teacher makes it way easier and quicker. If you're be able to get lessons for a while it'll be better for you and you can stop taking lessons whenever you feel to stop taking lessons. Then you can practice by yourself. First steps are always hard and you need to have some experience first. Also practicing anything in a wrong way would make it worse. So take lessons and learn it correctly
Good luck.
#7
Quote by mjphoto45
Ok here I go. I started guitar 40 years ago. Didnt play much but always enjoyed playing. Now fast forward to present time. Im 55 and just bought a Epiphone Casino guitar. I love it! I also picked up a Line 6 practice amp. Question: Should I self teach or pay for lessons. I am a quick learn and musically oriented. I dont plan on playing for anyone but myself but want to learn easier songs. Any advise would help. No jokesters ps also big John Lennon fan which helped my decision for a guitar. Thanks


I briefly took lessons but found out I wasn't learning any more than what I did from youtube or justinguitar . If you go with a teacher, like anything, do your research first. If they aren't helping you with technique or playing songs with you or giving you a structured lesson plan, then find someone else.

If you like the Beatles, check out the Beatles chord book on Amazon. It's awesome.
#8
Quote by 20Tigers
Honestly I don't think it makes a huge difference. The main things are your attitude, your commitment, and your discipline.

Keep a positive attitude to your practice, your progress, the music and the instrument. Try to adopt a childlike optimism and excitement. Focus on your progress you make, not how much more you have to learn.

Your commitment has to be solid. Keep a regularly scheduled daily practice regime, You have to be prepared to make this time a priority and non-negotiable. I'd suggest an hour a day but even 20 mins of focused practice everyday is better than three hours once a week on a Sunday.


Be disciplined, not just in keeping to your practice but in structuring your practice and sticking to your goals, in developing good habits and clean sounds. If you want to learn a song for example - which is where I would suggest you start - choose a song or two and stick with those songs until you master them - then pick up a new song and stick with it until you master it.

A teacher can help you structure your practice and help you find things to work on but plenty of people got by without a teacher. Including John Lennon.

The toughest thing about learning when you're not a kid or teenager is being positive about it. It's easier for kids to hear themselves play poorly and think they are amazing. As we get older we are more prone to see how much we suck and be discouraged. If you can get enthusiastic about your progress you'll do fine with or without a teacher.


I'm not sure I agree with that. Obviously it depends on what you're like, but if you're like me and make it too regimented it just becomes like a job or chore. If you want to play, that's half the battle won, if you ask me.

Also it's very demoralising if you make up too draconian a schedule which you then find after 2 days that you can't keep. If you are going to come up with a schedule it's better to come up with one you know you can manage, because at least that way you'll stay positive.

I mean I've never had a laid-out practice regime. I just play when I feel like it. Am I as good as I'd like to be? Nope, of course not. Would I be better had I had that regimented practice schedule? Probably, but I also might have got pissed off and quit.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?