#1
He offered the pastor an alternative arrangement of events. He proposed that God did not exist, that God was nothing more than a deus ex machina out to taunt us; that God was a proponent of the devil. You see, he said, the devil wants us to suffer; he wants to see us tormented, to torment ourselves and others. So, naturally as comes to a being of such might and ingeniousness, he created a protagonistic version of himself for people of all walks of life to fawn over and kill others who inevitably viewed certain traits of God as slightly different to their own, regardless of triviality or the pacifying words written in the holy books recited to scribes by the immutable whisper of the devil. He is laughing at us, pastor, he said, except me, for I know the truth.

The pastor, with fear on his tongue, enquired as to how the young man claimed to know the unknowable. A smirk, menacing, grimacing in its audacity, scarred the face of the man; and as the world crumbled away, the two of them stood on their earthly pillar suspended in the deepness of space, listening to the despairing screams and torturous screeches as the fires rose, hot ash landing on the pastor's bare arms. They singed the hairs there, a sulphurous stench. The devil put his hand on the pastor's shoulder and, with palm upturned, swept it across the pastor's field of vision, indicating the hellish landscape before them.

The pastor wept;

wrote the devil, laughing into the evil, evil night.
#4
the power in this peace is in its brevity and control of language. when you start dealing with sentences like "who inevitably viewed certain traits of God as slightly different to their own, regardless of triviality or the pacifying words written in the holy books recited to scribes by the immutable whisper of the devil." you lose the power in the wordiness. That said, this was very clear and clever.