#1
Okay, (I know this sounds really nooby but it's been bugging me for a long time) so I've wanted to be able to listen to a song and "chord" it out myself. The problem is I don't know how to use chord as a verb, so when I search how to chord a song, it just shows chords. My questions are:

(1) How do you call it when you "chord a song"
(2) How can I be able to listen to a song and write my own chord progression to it (that matches the song of course.)

Any input is very much appreciated.
#2
Quote by andersstruve
(1) How do you call it when you "chord a song"

Maybe "transcribe the chord progression"? Typically, when you write down the notes of a song, it's called "transcribing". But I don't know that you'll find too much, if you type "how to transcribe a chord progression" in google. You'll probably find a lot if you try "how to transcribe a song" though.


(2) How can I be able to listen to a song and write my own chord progression to it (that matches the song of course.)

Learn relative pitch. The Functional Ear Trainer from www.miles.be is a very effective free program that teaches you a method to do this.

By learning relative pitch, you'll be able to identify the tones in a song. And since chords are built of 3 or more tones*, that will allow you to identify the chords themselves.

*Note that diads, such as powerchords (aka "5th chords"; example: A5, B5, etc.), are not considered "full chords", as they only contain: a root and a 5th OR a root, a 5th, and an octave. Powerchords are NOT major or minor and are NOT diminished or augmented. This is why they're used so much in rock and metal, because they're very easy to harmonize with.

If you're not familiar with the concept of chord construction (meaning why we name chords as we do and which notes form what chords), I would do the following lessons to get started on the basics:
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/40
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/42
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/45
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/48
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Sep 9, 2013,
#3
Quote by crazysam23_Atax

Note that diads, such as powerchords (aka "5th chords"; example: A5, B5, etc.), are not considered "full chords", as they only contain: a root and a 5th OR a root, a 5th, and an octave. Powerchords are NOT major or minor and are NOT diminished or augmented. This is why they're used so much in rock and metal, because they're very easy to harmonize with.

That's true but usually the other chord tones come from the melody or other instruments. If guitar plays power chords, it doesn't mean the song doesn't have any real chords. Also, you can imply harmony with just power chords. For example if you play C5-A5-F5-G5, it will clearly sound like C major, A minor, F major, G major.

Also correction to your post: Power chords are either major or minor and not diminished or augmented. They can function as both major and minor chords but not as diminished (because it has a b5) or augmented (because it has a #5).
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#4
Quote by MaggaraMarine
That's true but usually the other chord tones come from the melody or other instruments. If guitar plays power chords, it doesn't mean the song doesn't have any real chords. Also, you can imply harmony with just power chords. For example if you play C5-A5-F5-G5, it will clearly sound like C major, A minor, F major, G major.

Of course.

Also correction to your post: Power chords are either major or minor and not diminished or augmented. They can function as both major and minor chords but not as diminished (because it has a b5) or augmented (because it has a #5).

Yes, but...by themselves, they have no major or minor tonality. The fact that they're only a root and 5th is what allows the rest of the instruments to fill in and give a major or minor tonality to the chords of progression.

I was merely trying to stress the versatility of powerchords to TS.