#1
Hey guys!
I'm quite new to recording and use relatively cheap equipent: Zoom Asio G2nu Interface in combination with Cubase LE5. Recording guitar tracks works well, but when it comes to recording the bass guitar I get terrible results, especially when playing low notes (on the e-string). I can't really explain it but these low notes sound really unnatural, almost like in this youtube video (jump to 1:08): watch?v=C2r_dJ40QI4
Do you know what causes the problem?
Thank you very much!!
Cheers, Ernst
#2
Sounds like it's clipping to me. Turn down your input stage.
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#3
^.

It probably is that, but it would be nice to have a recording of said result to be sure.
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#4
You need to increase the buffer size. I don't know how your settings work with your gear, but when adjusting for latency you reduce the buffer. If you go too low it will sound like that. I'm new to all this stuff as well, but that's what I've seen in my settings.


Last edited by D_M_I at Sep 11, 2013,
#5
^think you're confused. Sample rate isn't what you want to be adjusting. I think you mean buffer size?

TS, a copy of the actual recording would be great.

Again, ChemicalFire probably has the answer, just turn it down at the preamp.
#6
Thanks guys! I will create a soundcloud-account at once and upload a sample
#7
don't have a proper recording but quickly recorded a few low notes (no editing at all): https://soundcloud.com/testaccount_ernesto/bad-quality-sample

especially the last 2 notes clearly show my problem... By the way, the levels in Cubase stayed in the yellow/orange level and the "clipping-alert" didn't go off... (Sorry, English is not my native language, let me know if something is unclear to you!!
#8
I can confirm that's clipping.

If you can, turn the volume down on the pedal. If you can't, turn the volume down on the bass itself.
#9
Quote by tim_mop
^think you're confused. Sample rate isn't what you want to be adjusting. I think you mean buffer size?

That's what I said


Seriously though. You could also lower the pickup if turning the volume down doesn't fix it.
Last edited by D_M_I at Sep 11, 2013,
#10
the buffer size doe not matter for audio quality, it is just the number of samples that will be received or sent per turn. it just matters regarding cpu performance.
#11
Quote by BananaJoe
the buffer size doe not matter for audio quality, it is just the number of samples that will be received or sent per turn. it just matters regarding cpu performance.

But you get a hell of a noise if you set the sample rate too low for your processor too handle.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#12
Quote by BananaJoe
the buffer size doe not matter for audio quality, it is just the number of samples that will be received or sent per turn. it just matters regarding cpu performance.

Like I said I'm new to this stuff but adjusting the buffer size too low will create fuzz and distortion and I assume this is a pretty standard result.

If the cpu performance is causing the distortion and the low buffer is causing the cpu performance to be compromised, can we not say then that a low buffer effects the audio quality? It certainly seems like a valid option to look at when getting bad audio. I realize this isn't the problem for the TS.
#13
Thank you guys! In the manual of the interface I found this: Samplingfrequency 32/44, 1/48 kHz. Is this good enough?

I've got one more question: should I use the reverb/compression effects of my interface or add these effects in cubase instead?
#14
Do all effects in post.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#15
Clipping can happen anywhere in your chain - not just in the audio workstation.

My active pickups in my guitar make damn near any amp input clip. Of course, for heavier rock stuff, that's fine. For clean... not so much.

You could also be clipping the input of your interface.

Zoom in on the wav forms - really close - in Cubase and see what they look like. You can usually see clipping as the wav forms will appear to be chopped off straight across.

If it is dropouts because of the sample rate being too low, you should see that too. You'll see the wav form and then some dead space, and then more wav form and more dead space, etc.

I'm not sure what this means, as you put it: Samplingfrequency 32/44, 1/48 kHz

32/44 suggests to me, that you are recording at a bit depth of 32 bits and a sample rate of 44.1 khz. Last I checked, there is not an interface in this world that *actually* records at 32 bits, though some of them will produce a wav that is a 32-bit version of what was, originally, 24-bit data. A sample rate of 44.1 is quite typical. It's what I record at.

But then you have something about 1/48. That loses me. You can't be recording at both 44.1 AND 48 khz sample rates.

In any case, I suppose that's all moot to this problem anyways.

CT
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