Page 1 of 6
#1
http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/24071219

So the University of Edinburgh have banned Blurred Lines from all the buildings on campus because some random woman who runs a 'Stop Lad Banter' policy on campus doesn't like it.

It just seems really pathetic that stuff like this still happens.

You'd have thought that people would have moved on from the 1950s and Elvis-style censorship on music by now, but apparently people can't handle lyrics to a song that aren't even offensive.

The woman who's had it banned has said that it runs against their sexual harassment policy. Didn't realise people could be sexually harassed by hearing someone sing a song...

The University of Edinburgh is in the top 20 in the world table. You'd think they'd have people a bit smarter than this working for them...
'And after a while, you can work on points for style.
Like the club tie, and the firm handshake,
A certain look in the eye and an easy smile.'

'You have to be trusted by the people that you lie to,
So that when they turn their backs on you,
You'll get the chance to put the knife in.'
Last edited by digman50 at Sep 13, 2013,
#5
Good. A) it's shit and B) anything that sends any kind of message, no matter how small, to the music industry and general public that writing songs about rape is a bad thing is good.
#6
The only thing more stupid than that song is taking a serious view about the song.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#8
Quote by Johnny_Ibanez
Dat video doe

Yeah great. A bunch of half-naked zombies.
#9
Best thing about Blurred Lines

Quote by lambofgod127
btw im in hs and im almost 18 so if u do think she was flirting with me dont say that its wrong im almost a grown man.




༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽ WE ARE ROB ༼ ▀̿Ĺ̯▀̿ ̿ ༽
#10
Quote by Todd Hart
The only thing more stupid than that song is taking a serious view about the song.

Isn't this the kind of thing that contributes to rape culture and sexism? They wrote a song that is essentially about raping someone and people are saying 'it's not meant to be taken seriously'. Last I checked, rape was pretty serious. Playing it down seems like the complete wrong message to be sending.
#11
Quote by BelowTheSun
Isn't this the kind of thing that contributes to rape culture and sexism? They wrote a song that is essentially about raping someone and people are saying 'it's not meant to be taken seriously'. Last I checked, rape was pretty serious. Playing it down seems like the complete wrong message to be sending.

Last I checked, it wasn't about rape? It's just a horribly misogynistic song, and Robin Thicke is clearly an insecure asshole.
#12
Quote by BelowTheSun
Isn't this the kind of thing that contributes to rape culture and sexism? They wrote a song that is essentially about raping someone and people are saying 'it's not meant to be taken seriously'. Last I checked, rape was pretty serious. Playing it down seems like the complete wrong message to be sending.


Show me the lines that explicitly infer rape, beyond reasonable doubt.

It's just ridiculous to stop a song along the lines they have done. There's loads of songs that use just as bad language or could be deemed offensive.


Would you ban Elvis from being shown on TV anywhere in case he gyrates his hips?
No, because we're not backwards.

Pretty sure Robin Thicke or whoever wrote the song has specified multiple times that it's not about rape at all and all three of the guys singing in it are married afaik.
'And after a while, you can work on points for style.
Like the club tie, and the firm handshake,
A certain look in the eye and an easy smile.'

'You have to be trusted by the people that you lie to,
So that when they turn their backs on you,
You'll get the chance to put the knife in.'
#13
Quote by BelowTheSun
Isn't this the kind of thing that contributes to rape culture and sexism? They wrote a song that is essentially about raping someone and people are saying 'it's not meant to be taken seriously'. Last I checked, rape was pretty serious. Playing it down seems like the complete wrong message to be sending.


We're using slightly different senses of the word serious. I'm not saying that one should take it seriously and so one should see it as a joke: "it's just lad banter, y'know! Don't take it seriously man!". Of course rape and rape culture is serious, but the way to deal with bad art is to ignore it - to not even honour it with a serious glance. Because I guarantee, now that the song has been banned, every single student at the University of Edinburgh is listening to or has listened to the song, when otherwise they may never have had to endure it.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#14


I don't want to get into a thing. I haven't done any research into it, I've heard it a few times, I've read the lyrics, and I took it to be incredibly creepy and rapey. Other than that I've avoided it and everyone behind it like the plague, so I have no idea what has and hasn't been said. Just got my opinion, which isn't going to be changed.

^^ I can get behind that.
#15
Quote by digman50
It's just ridiculous to stop a song along the lines they have done. There's loads of songs that use just as bad language or could be deemed offensive.

In my opinion, none of them should be on the radio either.


Quote by digman50
Pretty sure Robin Thicke or whoever wrote the song has specified multiple times that it's not about rape

This is just funny, because even if it was about rape he wouldn't admit it.
#16
On one hand I would be glad I didn't have to hear it but if they banned a song I liked then I would be all like "you're not my mom"
Last edited by MattMez at Sep 13, 2013,
#17
Quote by Todd Hart
We're using slightly different senses of the word serious. I'm not saying that one should take it seriously and so one should see it as a joke: "it's just lad banter, y'know! Don't take it seriously man!". Of course rape and rape culture is serious, but the way to deal with bad art is to ignore it - to not even honour it with a serious glance. Because I guarantee, now that the song has been banned, every single student at the University of Edinburgh is listening to or has listened to the song, when otherwise they may never have had to endure it.

Damn. They've probably started a whole new culture where people hang out in bathroom stalls selling Robin Thicke CDs.
#18
Quote by whoomit
Robin Thicke is clearly an insecure asshole.

True, It was probably his idea to put up in big letters in the video "Robin Thicke has a Big D"
Also this guy has been in music for 10 years ,and no ones heard of him until now, he's gonna be a one hit wonder, actually I can just imagine how shit his concerts are , a load of people just sitting there, and he's gonna sing Blurred Lines, the audience will dance, then they'll sit down again, this song will curse him just like Sex on Fire has with Kings of Leon.
#19
Quote by lemmyisgod97
True, It was probably his idea to put up in big letters in the video "Robin Thicke has a Big D"
Also this guy has been in music for 10 years ,and no ones heard of him until now, he's gonna be a one hit wonder, actually I can just imagine how shit his concerts are , a load of people just sitting there, and he's gonna sing Blurred Lines, the audience will dance, then they'll sit down again, this song will curse him just like Sex on Fire has with Kings of Leon.



u must be 15 or something;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7K7orMOHqY

This was pretty well overplayed on MTV back then.

Then again it's a guy singing on a bike, it was probably more popular here then over there.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Sep 13, 2013,
#20
That song is super fucking rapey though. And read the article. The song hasn't been banned, they're just not playing it in venues because some people found that it trivialized sexual consent. Good.

Also, FUCK lad culture while I'm at it. What a bunch of wankers.
#22
I don't care about the message it does or does not convey, it is just an obnoxious and generally shit song.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#23
i love this song. i listen to it before going out, and later on whilst raping females.
Click here to hear my BOB DYLAN (Blowing in the Wind) out right now May 2k17
#24
It's not even the video that they've banned which is the strange thing for me. I could understand if they banned the uncensored video but it just seems weird.

Now they'll be under pressure to ban every other song that intimates anything that could be construed as sexual harassment and encourages the continuation of 'lad banter'

Think they've cause more problems for themselves by doing it, but yay for free publicity!

Also, I don't particularly think the song is great, I think it's catchy and clearly from a musical aspect it has achieved its aims, hence its popularity. I also like the bass part
'And after a while, you can work on points for style.
Like the club tie, and the firm handshake,
A certain look in the eye and an easy smile.'

'You have to be trusted by the people that you lie to,
So that when they turn their backs on you,
You'll get the chance to put the knife in.'
Last edited by digman50 at Sep 13, 2013,
#25
So I'm guessing all Lost Prophets songs will be banned because he's accused of being a pedophile.
I was really looking forward to their new album "Stranger Danger"
#27
I get why many people go "I don't get why people get so worked up about this guy"

But if you examine his material more closely you'll end up discovering many subliminal messages


/] 三方 [\
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
#28
Quote by digman50
Now they'll be under pressure to ban every other song that intimates anything that could be construed as sexual harassment and encourages the continuation of 'lad banter'
It's a campaign to allow women to feel safer on campus. So what if that includes cutting a few songs from playlists in student bars?
#29
Quote by laid-to-waste
i love this song. i listen to it before going out, and later on whilst raping females.

But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#30
Quote by psyks
It's a campaign to allow women to feel safer on campus. So what if that includes cutting a few songs from playlists in student bars?


*Hears a song playing that's not even about rape*

"I'm clearly going to be brutally attacked now, excuse me while I run off and cry over **** all"



I just think it's so stupid to do it, they'd be better off just not playing it as much. It's clearly a popular song so there can't be many people having a problem with it.

I suppose everyone has their opinion and that's respectable
'And after a while, you can work on points for style.
Like the club tie, and the firm handshake,
A certain look in the eye and an easy smile.'

'You have to be trusted by the people that you lie to,
So that when they turn their backs on you,
You'll get the chance to put the knife in.'
#31
Quote by psyks
It's a campaign to allow women to feel safer on campus. So what if that includes cutting a few songs from playlists in student bars?



And how is infringing the rights of others to make another group 'feel safe' a good thing?
Check out my band Disturbed
#32
Also, people aren't forced to go the bars and listen to the song, they optionally choose to expose themselves to a song that's the 2nd best selling single this year and is believed to have been heard by close to a quarter of a billion people.

Get Lucky by Daft Punk is also about sex. Could it be considered offensive and degrading of women? Surely it should be banned!


'And after a while, you can work on points for style.
Like the club tie, and the firm handshake,
A certain look in the eye and an easy smile.'

'You have to be trusted by the people that you lie to,
So that when they turn their backs on you,
You'll get the chance to put the knife in.'
#33
While the song is shit, my jimmies get rustled any time something gets banned because someone was offended. Like they're important enough for their offendedness to mean anything.

People have a real entitlement and privilege problem when they don't like something so they remove it for everyone else.
#34
Quote by digman50
*Hears a song playing that's not even about rape*

"I'm clearly going to be brutally attacked now, excuse me while I run off and cry over **** all"
Well, the song's (from a man's point of view) about a woman who he thinks wants to have sex with him, but isn't saying yes. You have to agree that that's kinda rapey?

Turns out that for a lot of women, having kinda rapey songs played to them isn't that awesome. Some of them don't 'get all emotional and cry', as you implied, but organise campaigns to stand up for themselves and others.
#35
Quote by psyks
Well, the song's (from a man's point of view) about a woman who he thinks wants to have sex with him, but isn't saying yes. You have to agree that that's kinda rapey?


No, it's not kind of rapey. In fact it's the complete opposite because he's not making a move until he gets a clear invitation. That's what the song is about. He thinks she wants him but he doesn't want to move forward until she gives him a clear message.

He's 99% sure that she wants to, but he's not taking the next step until she says to. That's the definition of proper protocol.
#36
Quote by psyks
Well, the song's (from a man's point of view) about a woman who he thinks wants to have sex with him, but isn't saying yes. You have to agree that that's kinda rapey?

Turns out that for a lot of women, having kinda rapey songs played to them isn't that awesome. Some of them don't 'get all emotional and cry', as you implied, but organise campaigns to stand up for themselves and others.


Most women I know couldn't care less about this song. It's only the overly-sensitive ones that get worked up over everything.
#37
Quote by psyks
Well, the song's (from a man's point of view) about a woman who he thinks wants to have sex with him, but isn't saying yes. You have to agree that that's kinda rapey?

Turns out that for a lot of women, having kinda rapey songs played to them isn't that awesome. Some of them don't 'get all emotional and cry', as you implied, but organise campaigns to stand up for themselves and others.


I'm up all night to get some
She's up all night for good fun
I'm up all night to get lucky


Your gift keeps on giving,
What is this I'm feeling?
If you wanna leave I'm ready (ah)


Get Lucky could be suggested to be a bit rapey

What about 'Baby It's Cold Outside'? I hear that played everywhere at Christmas

It's about forcing alcohol on a girl, against her will, so that she stays at the guys house for the night with sex clearly implied.

I just think it's silly because as far as I can see it's not even a group of people that have complained, it's one employee who's decided that it's inappropriate and that because she doesn't like it no-one else can listen to it, which is a deprivation of other people's rights.
'And after a while, you can work on points for style.
Like the club tie, and the firm handshake,
A certain look in the eye and an easy smile.'

'You have to be trusted by the people that you lie to,
So that when they turn their backs on you,
You'll get the chance to put the knife in.'
Last edited by digman50 at Sep 13, 2013,
#38
Quote by StewieSwan
And how is infringing the rights of others to make another group 'feel safe' a good thing?
Women have a greater right to not feel they're in a rapey atmosphere than guys have a right to have a song they like be played.
#39
Quote by psyks
Women have a greater right to not feel they're in a rapey atmosphere than guys have a right to have a song they like be played.


Since when does the song produce a 'rapey atmosphere'?

They are choosing to go to a venue where it is obvious that this song will be played (it lasts like 4 minutes anyway ) and then complaining.

The obvious answer is not go if you're going to get that offended over a 4 minute pop song.

Again it's not even a group that have complained afaik, it's one person who has taken it upon herself to make the decision.

It'd be like turning up at an Iron Maiden concert and the complaining that the volume is hurting your ears and that all concerts have to be played at quieter levels
'And after a while, you can work on points for style.
Like the club tie, and the firm handshake,
A certain look in the eye and an easy smile.'

'You have to be trusted by the people that you lie to,
So that when they turn their backs on you,
You'll get the chance to put the knife in.'
Last edited by digman50 at Sep 13, 2013,
#40
Quote by whoomit
In my opinion, none of them should be on the radio either.


I'm reasonably sure we could find people who are of the opinion that things that you do/like/say are 'offensive' and should be 'banned' as well...

Why should their opinions count less than yours?

I think the 'art' in question is utter garbage, but I would never support it being banned because I actually believe in personal liberty, rather than a liberty at someone else's convenience.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin