#1
To start off, my new Agile 3001 came in the mail yesterday, and it's sweet. Plays like a dream and works just the way I want it to, with a bit of room for change in the pickup department, but the stocks are still great.
Here's a pic just to satisfy your eyeballs; (Invalid img)
You might not be able to see it, I dunno, I don't feel like uploading it anywhere.

ANYWAY. Aside from the great things, there is a bit of fret buzz. And I'm almost certain I can hear through the amp, and I just tested it with big, puffy, outside noise-cancelling headphones, and I could hear the buzz and the tone being degraded along with it.
I kinda liked it with my older guitar, very suitable when playing the likes of Tool.
But this is the guitar I want to take seriously and have as close to perfect as I can.

I'm in love with this low action that I've never had the privilege to have on one of my guitar before but time and time again I've encountered an action this low of friends' guitars, and guitars at shops. I don't think I'll be able to emotionally handle raising the action .001 of a Centimeter.

It may be the truss rod that needs adjusting, the fret-to-string measurement while holding a fret at the top and one near the bottom, is very slim. I'd say like, half a centimeter. I was thinking this may need adjusting, loosening to be exact, even regardless that it fixes the buzz? And I thought about very slightly turning up the saddles because of my assumption that the rod adjustment would result in lowering the action further, am I right?

I could also be completely wrong and I need to do the opposite of what I just said, I'm no expert. I haven't taken it to a shop yet because A) I don't trust the "bigger" companies, B) I don't want to spend money, and C) I want to learn to do this myself, most importantly.

I'm just reaching out for ideas here, like always.
Guitars:
Agile AL - 3001
Fender Stratocaster HSS
Agile AL- 2000
Squier Stratocaster VII
Amps:
Vox AC30C2
Vox AC15C1 X
Peavey Vypyr 30 X
Line 6 Spider III 75 X
Peavey Blazer 158 X
#2
Check the neck relief, but you may need to have a tech level the frets on it
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Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#3
check the guitar setup sticky, i'm sure it has info on doing trussrods and the like.

a trussrod tweak may fix the problems, or it may not.

Nice guitar, by the way
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
Quote by Robbgnarly
Check the neck relief, but you may need to have a tech level the frets on it


Could be it. These are stainless-steel frets that are hand-filed already, but I know that doesn't mean there isn't room for error.
Guitars:
Agile AL - 3001
Fender Stratocaster HSS
Agile AL- 2000
Squier Stratocaster VII
Amps:
Vox AC30C2
Vox AC15C1 X
Peavey Vypyr 30 X
Line 6 Spider III 75 X
Peavey Blazer 158 X
#5
Quote by Johnnybizzoy
Could be it. These are stainless-steel frets that are hand-filed already, but I know that doesn't mean there isn't room for error.

Yeah, but try slightly raising the side of the saddle the string(s) that are buzzing on. See if that helps at all

It could be an improperly cut nut also
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#6
Yeah you need to be like half that distance when measuring the relief. You will need to just keep adjusting things until it's right. If you think the action is too high after you get it all sorted, you may need to have the fretts touched up.

How many fretts on how many strings are buzzing?
#7
Really? So should I tighten the neck?

And it's basically every string all over the neck. The strings are a bit fresh I think, but not any less than a week old.

I'm not strumming too hard, and even a light pick can buzz the bass side especially.
Guitars:
Agile AL - 3001
Fender Stratocaster HSS
Agile AL- 2000
Squier Stratocaster VII
Amps:
Vox AC30C2
Vox AC15C1 X
Peavey Vypyr 30 X
Line 6 Spider III 75 X
Peavey Blazer 158 X
Last edited by Johnnybizzoy at Sep 14, 2013,
#8
Quote by Johnnybizzoy
Really? So should I tighten the neck?

And it's basically every string all over the neck. The strings are a bit fresh I think, but not any less than a week old.

I'm not strumming too hard, and even a light pick can buzz the bass side especially.


Yes. tighten it. When you hold down the string at the first fret and the 17th or so, you should barely see a gap. It should be less than 1mm. Basically you're saying you have 3/16 of an inch(1/2 CM) gap, that's huge. Which doesn't make sense if you are saying the action is amazing. Maybe you meant 1/2 a mm not CM? If it's 1/2 a mm it's perfect and you have other issues. Raising the action may be necessary.

If it really is that big of a gap, you'll want to go a quarter turn and let it sit at least a few hours and check again. It may take longer but if it's still a large gap you can turn it again and then let it sit overnight. Keep making 1/4 turns and waiting util it settles at the correct gap.

You will have to make adjustments to your action and intonation afterwards.


One note. It's kinda hard to tell in the picture, but those pickups look high. Make sure your strings aren't buzzing off them.
Last edited by D_M_I at Sep 14, 2013,
#9
Leave the truss rod alone.

Did you change string gauges (lighter strings)? Those things usually come with 10's.

First step is to make sure the frets are level. You need a good metal straightedge for this, and you need one long enough to handle 3-4 frets at a time.

See the long one and the short one in this shot? You're looking for one (or more) frets that are higher than the others. A good tech will be able to press these back in for you.





If (and only if) your frets are level, then you can bring up the truss rod a little bit. Tightening the truss rod produces back bow, loosening it allows string tension to pull the headstock forward. Righty tighty, lefty loosey. No more than a quarter turn at a time, retuning in between and then let it settle in for a while. If you can slip a *new* playing card (not a credit card, not a business card) under the string at the 7th fret when the string at the 1st and 17th frets is held down without touching the string, you've got too much relief. Relief should really be set with feeler gauges (the kind you use to gap spark plugs). A half millimeter of relief is WAY too much.

The "I don't want to spend no more money" business probably isn't your best choice. When I get a guitar that's new (to me), I budget for a really good initial setup as part of the price of the guitar. Doesn't matter if it's a $200 Agile or a $2000 Gibson. I've been splurging for a fret superglue and a PLEK job, but that's expensive. On the other hand, the fret superglue insures that I don't have flyer frets when the weather changes and it pretty much eliminates "dead" frets. The PLEK makes sure that everything's level. The setup part makes sure that the strings are following the radius of the fretboard/bridge/nut and that the pickups aren't too close to the strings when I fret a note. It also makes sure that the saddles and nut are adjusted/cut properly.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 14, 2013,
#10
Quote by dspellman
Leave the truss rod alone.

Did you change string gauges (lighter strings)? Those things usually come with 10's.

First step is to make sure the frets are level. You need a good metal straightedge for this, and you need one long enough to handle 3-4 frets at a time.

See the long one and the short one in this shot? You're looking for one (or more) frets that are higher than the others. A good tech will be able to press these back in for you.





If (and only if) your frets are level, then you can bring up the truss rod a little bit. Tightening the truss rod produces back bow, loosening it allows string tension to pull the headstock forward. Righty tighty, lefty loosey. No more than a quarter turn at a time, retuning in between and then let it settle in for a while. If you can slip a *new* playing card (not a credit card, not a business card) under the string at the 7th fret when the string at the 1st and 17th frets is held down without touching the string, you've got too much relief. Relief should really be set with feeler gauges (the kind you use to gap spark plugs). A half millimeter of relief is WAY too much.

The "I don't want to spend no more money" business probably isn't your best choice. When I get a guitar that's new (to me), I budget for a really good initial setup as part of the price of the guitar. Doesn't matter if it's a $200 Agile or a $2000 Gibson. I've been splurging for a fret superglue and a PLEK job, but that's expensive. On the other hand, the fret superglue insures that I don't have flyer frets when the weather changes and it pretty much eliminates "dead" frets. The PLEK makes sure that everything's level. The setup part makes sure that the strings are following the radius of the fretboard/bridge/nut and that the pickups aren't too close to the strings when I fret a note. It also makes sure that the saddles and nut are adjusted/cut properly.

You have to level the fret board before you can level the frets. Other wise you are going to fukk shit up and never get your frets truly level. This requires removing all the strings and turning the truss-rod until the fretboard is flat. I use an aluminum straight-edge with small notches (skill saw cuts) where every fret is on a specific scale length.

This rests the straight-edge on the actual fretboard not the frets. When you get the fretboard level, then you use a straight edge on the frets. But this is where I do things a bit different.

I then level frets 1-12 with the proper radius blocks (stew-mac) but I go a tad lower from frets 12-what ever it has. This will allow you to have a lower action with no fret buzz while chording or fretting out while soloing up high. I learned this from Sully'sGuitar Garage and it is the absolute best way to get the frets correct by hand

But otherwise, I agree a new guitar needs to be set up normally
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#11
Quote by dspellman
Leave the truss rod alone.

First step is to make sure the frets are level.

If (and only if) your frets are level, then you can bring up the truss rod a little bit.


No. There is no reason to think he needs a fret job on a new guitar. I realize it's possible, but leveling shouldn't be the first option. If he truly has 3/16 of relief, he needs to straighten the neck before worrying about frets.

Or, he simply needs to raise the action a bit, but like I said the 1/2 CM seems to not make this the issue.

I think he meant 1/2 mm relief and I suspect the pickups are touching a bit, or he has one or two frets high on the board that are lifted causing everything to be messed up.

I find it hard to believe a brand new guitar has fret buzz on all strings on the entire fret board, while having a huge relief already. I would return it to be honest if that were the case.
Last edited by D_M_I at Sep 14, 2013,
#12
Quote by D_M_I
No. There is no reason to think he needs a fret job on a new guitar. I realize it's possible, but leveling shouldn't be the first option. If he truly has 3/16 of relief, he needs to straighten the neck before worrying about frets.

Or, he simply needs to raise the action a bit, but like I said the 1/2 CM seems to not make this the issue.

I think he meant 1/2 mm relief and I suspect the pickups are touching a bit, or he has one or two frets high on the board that are lifted causing everything to be messed up.

I find it hard to believe a brand new guitar has fret buzz on all strings on the entire fret board, while having a huge relief already. I would return it to be honest if that were the case.


OH shit I just realized that yes it is, like half a MM, the best I could measure by myself.
I just now realized it -.-

I tightened the neck slightly last night with no result. I haven't the raised the bridge yet, but I think I'm just going to take it to a shop sometime soon.
Guitars:
Agile AL - 3001
Fender Stratocaster HSS
Agile AL- 2000
Squier Stratocaster VII
Amps:
Vox AC30C2
Vox AC15C1 X
Peavey Vypyr 30 X
Line 6 Spider III 75 X
Peavey Blazer 158 X
Last edited by Johnnybizzoy at Sep 15, 2013,
#13
Quote by Johnnybizzoy
OH shit I just realized that yes it is, like half a MM, the best I could measure by myself.
I just now realized it -.-

I tightened the neck slightly last night with no result. I haven't the raised the bridge yet, but I think I'm just going to take it to a shop sometime soon.



Good. I thought that seemed pretty crazy, lol. Did you look at the pickups to see if the strings are too close to them?

Probably just need to raise the bridge a bit. It's easy enough to do before paying someone.
#14
Quote by D_M_I
No. There is no reason to think he needs a fret job on a new guitar. I realize it's possible, but leveling shouldn't be the first option. If he truly has 3/16 of relief, he needs to straighten the neck before worrying about frets.

Or, he simply needs to raise the action a bit, but like I said the 1/2 CM seems to not make this the issue.

I think he meant 1/2 mm relief and I suspect the pickups are touching a bit, or he has one or two frets high on the board that are lifted causing everything to be messed up.

I find it hard to believe a brand new guitar has fret buzz on all strings on the entire fret board, while having a huge relief already. I would return it to be honest if that were the case.


+1

I think you guys are overthinking it, maybe. (I mean I'm no tech, so maybe you aren't )

there's a reasonable chance the truss rod was loosened for shipping, say. I've got guitars like that before. That'd make the thing play pretty badly/buzz all over the neck. Or maybe it's just got a silly low action.

And if it's not the trussrod, it's going back. all the frets shouldn't be bad- if they are it's a lemon and you use your warranty to get a replacement/refund.

Budget for a plek setup on a brand new $400 guitar? That's under warranty? What are you smoking?
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Sep 15, 2013,
#15
Quote by Dave_Mc
+1

I think you guys are overthinking it, maybe. (I mean I'm no tech, so maybe you aren't )

there's a reasonable chance the truss rod was loosened for shipping, say. I've got guitars like that before. That'd make the thing play pretty badly/buzz all over the neck. Or maybe it's just got a silly low action.

And if it's not the trussrod, it's going back. all the frets shouldn't be bad- if they are it's a lemon and you use your warranty to get a replacement/refund.

Budget for a plek setup on a brand new $400 guitar? That's under warranty? What are you smoking?

I was just letting dspellman know the correct way to level frets. I agree if a slight trussrod/bridge adjustment does not work, send it back
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
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#16
ah no worries

that post was mostly to dspellman anyway
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#17
Well I went ahead and contacted Kurt and I'll see whether or not I can just grab a newer one or if I should get it set up / diagnosed first before I make any decision.
Guitars:
Agile AL - 3001
Fender Stratocaster HSS
Agile AL- 2000
Squier Stratocaster VII
Amps:
Vox AC30C2
Vox AC15C1 X
Peavey Vypyr 30 X
Line 6 Spider III 75 X
Peavey Blazer 158 X
#18
Ultra-low action is overrated, anyway.
Quote by SteveHouse
This thread is officially about sucking Sleaze off for a sig.


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Hey Sleaze I'll give you a blowjob if you sig me. Maybe even some nudey photos?


Quote by crazy8rgood


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#19
Quote by Sleaze Disease
Ultra-low action is overrated, anyway.


I think it plays amazing to be honest, for me anyway.
Guitars:
Agile AL - 3001
Fender Stratocaster HSS
Agile AL- 2000
Squier Stratocaster VII
Amps:
Vox AC30C2
Vox AC15C1 X
Peavey Vypyr 30 X
Line 6 Spider III 75 X
Peavey Blazer 158 X
#20
Quote by Sleaze Disease
Ultra-low action is overrated, anyway.


Depends on how you play.
#21
Quote by Dave_Mc


Budget for a plek setup on a brand new $400 guitar? That's under warranty? What are you smoking?


I've plek'd several guitars now, including a brand new gibson Axcess Custom that was supposed to have been plek'd at the factory ($4K+) and an Agile AL-2000 Floyd B stock that cost me under $200, shipped, with HSC. I got a break on that one, in part because I'd had a whole potload of work done on other guitars shortly before that. Also Plek'd a used (but new to me) AL-3100 Floyd that cost me about $200. The AL-2000 was minor; had a buzz above the 16th fret when I did a full-stop bend. It's been absolutely perfect since the PLEK job three or four years ago. The AL-3100 was all over the place. It was in pristine condition, but the owner lived in a desert and admitted (after he sold me the guitar, of course) that he could never get it set up properly. It's been perfect ever since its PLEK setup.

The Gibson exhibited a bit of the Gibson Hump (a sort of ski jump where the frets around the 16th fret and below are actually a bit higher than the frets further up the neck). I'm not sure what causes it, but it's a pretty common occurrence on (Gibson, in particular) LPs. It's pretty obvious when you look at the monitor on the PLEK machine. Most Gibsons ship with medium-high action and folks who simply play with that action out of the box never notice it.

If you like playing with lower action (as does the OP, apparently), you either ship the guitar back (do you know what the wait is to get another Axcess Custom, from start to delivery, from Gibson?) and hope you get a new one without any issues, or you fix the one you've got. A Korean guitar may have had its frets hand-filed, but it's also had an 11,000 mile trip over a lot of different climate zones and a period of several weeks. This is why Schecter has a Burbank location that goes over the guitars and sets them up before they're subjected to the air conditioning and Eruption-players at Guitar Centers all over the country. And they still come home out of rig.

I have the frets superglued for two reasons. One is to prevent flyer frets during periods of low humidity (which just wastes the money you spent on the PLEK job) and the other is to reduce the number of dead frets (yeah, it's a cork-sniffy tone thing). Here's what StewMac has to say about it: http://www.stewmac.com/tsarchive/ts0043.html A lot of custom hand guitar builders Titebond their frets when they install them. Manufacturers rarely do that. Unfortunately, fret slots can be cut a bit large, tangs on fretwire can be a bit narrow and there you go.

The only guitars I've ever had from a larger manufacturer that had perfect frets were Carvins. Mine range from 1988 to 2006 models and all were delivered perfect and all but one have remained so.

The other reason I have frets PLEK'd is that I can take any guitar into Gary Brawer and he can look up my preferences (they save on a computer file) and program those into the machine before he begins. None of this "some guitars play this way, some play that way" silliness.

All of the PLEK'd LP style guitars play the same, no matter what the original price. If I can have a cheap guitar play as well as a $4K Gibson, why would I not?
#22
Quote by dspellman
Depends on how you play.


Funnily enough, when you see those big-name guys up there shredding, their action actually isn't as low as you probably imagine it is.
Quote by SteveHouse
This thread is officially about sucking Sleaze off for a sig.


Quote by tayroar
Hey Sleaze I'll give you a blowjob if you sig me. Maybe even some nudey photos?


Quote by crazy8rgood


Sleaze, that made me lulz in my pants.


Quote by 36mikeyb36
hahaha Sleaze i'd give you my mom for that one.
#23
Quote by dspellman




The only guitars I've ever had from a larger manufacturer that had perfect frets were Carvins. Mine range from 1988 to 2006 models and all were delivered perfect and all but one have remained so.


The first and only carvin I purchased came with two raised frets. Just sayin. I loved the guitar regardless and hold no grudge.
#24
Quote by Robbgnarly
I was just letting dspellman know the correct way to level frets. I agree if a slight trussrod/bridge adjustment does not work, send it back


And thanks. I know the correct way to level frets manually, but your description was well done. I've begun to pay the extra for the PLEK job for several reasons:

One, it removes ONLY the minimal amount of material (which lengthens the time between refrets).

Two, it does the actual measurement under string tension. Necks don't always come up evenly when brought back to string tension after a manual fret level, and techs often have to go back and tweak the leveling to compensate for that. Not an issue with the PLEK.

Three, the fret level can be customized easily. As you note, it can sometimes be beneficial to lower the frets slightly in the cowboy chord region and keep them higher in the bendy wanking region up the neck. Or maybe you prefer the opposite; you want more fret meat where your guitar is most likely to have fret wear and can tolerate less up high.

Four, it's repeatable on other guitars you own and on new guitars that you buy.

Five, it's fast. I took one guitar in to Gary on a busy Saturday at 11 am. Gary handed me back the guitar at 6 pm that evening. It's not something I'd try to get him to do on a regular basis, but he didn't have to put aside a whole lot of other work while the guitar was on the machine, either. I've seen guitars delivered to techs for a fret level that have simply disappeared into the workload for a month.

Six, it's easy to tell if the neck's moving around (and how it's moving) if you simply analyze it on the PLEK more than once over a several year period.

Last, Gary offers to "freshen" your setup at any time over a 12-month period after you have the guitar PLEK'd (only 6 months for a manual fret level), even if that requires an additional run on the PLEK.
#25
Quote by Sleaze Disease
Funnily enough, when you see those big-name guys up there shredding, their action actually isn't as low as you probably imagine it is.


In some cases, I know exactly where the action is. Here's Gary Brawer with Neal Schon after having set up one of Neal's guitars:



And here's his old black Schon prototype after a refret and PLEK at Gary's shop (phone shots, sorry):

#26
Quote by dspellman

The only guitars I've ever had from a larger manufacturer that had perfect frets were Carvins.

All of the PLEK'd LP style guitars play the same, no matter what the original price. If I can have a cheap guitar play as well as a $4K Gibson, why would I not?


There's a big difference between "not quite perfect" and "buzzing all over the place" like the TS's guitar, though.

Also the couple of plekked guitars I've tried (admittedly, off-the-shelf guitars which are claimed to have had plekking done as part of the manufacturing/original setup; taking it to a guy like you do may well have a more involved version of a plekking) were pretty good, but I wouldn't say they were the absolute best fret jobs I've ever tried, either. I think you hit the nail on the head elsewhere in your post- the consistency is the big bonus for plekking. But in my (as I said, limited) experience, a good luthier's fret crowning is at least as good.

that's a good point regarding the cheap guitar versus $4k guitar, but personally (and maybe it is silly) I'd feel a bit weird forking out as much on a plek setup as the guitar is worth.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#27
Quote by Dave_Mc


Also the couple of plekked guitars I've tried (admittedly, off-the-shelf guitars which are claimed to have had plekking done as part of the manufacturing/original setup; taking it to a guy like you do may well have a more involved version of a plekking) were pretty good, but I wouldn't say they were the absolute best fret jobs I've ever tried, either. I think you hit the nail on the head elsewhere in your post- the consistency is the big bonus for plekking. But in my (as I said, limited) experience, a good luthier's fret crowning is at least as good.


Ignore Gibson's claim of PLEKking -- several PLEK owners corralled the PLEK folks at a Winter NAMM a couple of years ago, protesting that the way Gibson was using a PLEK machine (often before the guitar was even painted, using a fixture that "simulated" string tension, using a generic "fret mill" setting) was ruining the reputation of the PLEK. When you've shelled out $100K and more for a PLEK machine, that's a big deal. Gibson pulled in PLEK machines at the behest of their marketing department as a counter to the reputation they were (deservedly) getting for crappy fretwork on new guitars. Whether the reputation was deserved or not, whether it was their fault or not, it was there, and Marketing decided to ride the coattails of the PLEK reputation for precision.

There's a world of difference between having a PLEK job done by a really good tech who's also doing the setup on your guitar and whatever Gibson is doing. FWIW, Suhr is also doing a PLEK job on its guitars before they leave the plant, but this is being done the right way, under string tension and often (except for stockists' guitars) to a particular custom's specification.


Quote by Dave_Mc
that's a good point regarding the cheap guitar versus $4k guitar, but personally (and maybe it is silly) I'd feel a bit weird forking out as much on a plek setup as the guitar is worth.


I agree. I felt absolutely stupid or maybe batf*ck crazy paying that much to PLEK the cheap guitars at the time. Even Gary raised his eyebrows a bit. And I always get the same reaction ("what are you smokin', dude?") when I suggest it.
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 15, 2013,
#28
^ yeah. I know why gibson went for the plek I also have a framus which claims it's been plekked. Whether they put as much effort into it as suhr and the like, I dunno. it's a good fret job, but I wouldn't say an amazing one.

and LOL
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#29
My PRS is a 2002 I bought new, never had to do any fret-work, action or intonation work. It is the only guitar I have ever bought that needed nothing.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate