#1
Well I've seen plenty of guitars that have customized built in inlays to the body of the guitar, making designs of whatever.

Now what I thought to try was, to take a simple design and then score the outline onto the body of wood, probably about 1-2 mm into the wood. Then I would go over it with a black dyed/ebony grain filler. So the scoring gets filled, ideally then you should sand out the top, and you would have the grain popping and the design filled and uniformly black.

The Why - Now I thought about doing an actual engraving, but decided, I still want the flat glossy finish. And I don't really care that it wouldn't be 3 dimensional. And I wanted it to kind of be subtle, and natural as possible all things considered.

Does this sound feasible, I've tried googling images and looking around for some inspiration, but really haven't found anything.

Anybody with some extensive finishing experience have any ideas if this sounds feasible? I would be going with a red or blue dye and either poly or truoil finish.

I'm still in the planning stages for my next build, but wanted to play around with some ideas.
#2
It seems to make sense to me. It's essentially a wood-filler inlay. Don't see why it wouldn't work.
#3
That's actually a cool idea. I went after a craptastic bass body I had with my dremmel type carving tools and made ... something ugly.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=580793615293379&l=ee02af28b7

I think you're on the right track with filling your design, sanding it, then clear coating. I did another guitar with a tung oil finish and it turned out really nice. The beauty of that is no finger prints.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=541149315924476&l=395588f458

Also you might look at some of the pics for Paul Reed Smith dragon inlay guitars. I know it's not really what you're trying to accomplish, but it might give you some ideas.
#4
Wood filler shrinks over time. Engraving filler on the other hand, I don't know anything about.

A possible work-around would be to lay toothpicks or small strips of scrap wood into the engraving then filling with wood filler or whatever. Less filler=less shrinkage.
#5
A company called Scarred guitars does this. I'm sure others do as well.
#6
use epoxy that you have dyed with craft store paint. works great. can use up to 10% paint to the epoxy mix.
#7
Quote by Invader Jim
Wood filler shrinks over time. Engraving filler on the other hand, I don't know anything about.

A possible work-around would be to lay toothpicks or small strips of scrap wood into the engraving then filling with wood filler or whatever. Less filler=less shrinkage.


See it's stuff like that I need to know, thanks!

I'm definitely testing this out on some scrap first. I'll try to epoxy method.