#1
1-4-5-7

Thats the formula. Does a Maj7sus4 exist?

The other possibilities would be

1-2-4-5
1-3-4-7
1-2-5-6

Also The chord formula 1-2-5-7 Does a Major7sus2 exist?

With the other possibilities being the following.

1-4-6-7
1-3-4-5
1-2-3-6

Also This chord formula 1-6-7

With the other possibilities being

1-2-3
1-2-7
Last edited by dannydawiz at Sep 18, 2013,
#3
Triad + extension = C add2 for example. Or C add4.

7th chord + extension = C major 9 (Indicating C major 7 chord with a 2nd in there somewhere) or C major 11 (C major 7 with a 4th thrown in)

At least that's generally how I look at it.
#5
You'll usually find this chord functioning either as a suspension + ******ation in a a V7 - cadence. In other contexts I'd call it V7 over a tonic pedal.

Edit: As if a legit musical device is censored on this board
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Sep 21, 2013,
#6
The first chord could be an 11 chord (BTW it's 1-3-4-b7, not 1-3-4-7 and the 1-2-5-6 would be 1-b2-b5-b6 but whatever). For example if the notes were C, F, G and B, it could be a G11 chord.

If the notes in the second chord were C, D, G and B, it could be a Gadd11.

The names of course depend on the context. They could also be maj7sus4 and maj7sus2 chords.

The last one isn't a chord unless you add some more notes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Quote by griffRG7321
You'll usually find this chord functioning either as a suspension + ******ation in a a V7 - cadence. In other contexts I'd call it V7 over a tonic pedal.

Edit: As if a legit musical device is censored on this board

#8
You can list endless chord formulae each with as many possible interpretations as notes in the chord, but nothing is definitive without context: what's the bass playing? What are the chords before and after? What's the key? What's the melody doing?

How you get to a chord tells you more about it than the actual spelling. As long as you can convince the listener that some goofy dissonant chord actually functions on the given root, that's the root.


Quick advices:

1) learn about chord inversions, because many of your listed formulae are standard chords in inversion. You're just spelling them based on the "wrong" root

2) Get used to spelling chord tones in chordal fasion rather than scalar. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 is how scales are spelled. Chords are spelled in thirds: 1-3-5-7-9-11-13.

Notice the lack of 2, 4, and 6 - those are used is pretty specific circumstances, usually where you're substituting a chord tone (2 subs for 1, 4 subs for 3, 6 for 7). Don't use 2, 4, and 6 unless you know why you're doing it. Generally if you have a root, third, and 7th, anything else will be a 9, 11, or 13 (or alteration of the 5th).


Quote by MaggaraMarine
The first chord could be an 11 chord (BTW it's 1-3-4-b7, not 1-3-4-7 and the 1-2-5-6 would be 1-b2-b5-b6 but whatever). For example if the notes were C, F, G and B, it could be a G11 chord.


Usually need a third before you can have an 11th, and natural 11ths are pretty unusual on Maj7 chords. I'd call it Maj7sus4 without a compelling reason otherwise. #11 is different.

Maj7sus2 would be spelled 2-3-5-7. Sus typically refers to a note a step above the normal chord tone, because there's an expectation that it's going to resolve down. If it's non-resolving, I'd call it a rootless 9th chord.

Those other formulae you listed really depend on context to determine the root. The lowest note doesn't need to be the root.

1-2-4-5 makes more sense re-spelled 4-5-7-1, making it a [dominant]7sus4. I mean you can have a chord spelled 1-2-4-5, but you'd need to somehow convince the listener the lowest note is actually the root.

1-3-4-7 is likely a Maj7add11, though it's a bit unusual. Could be re-spelled as 5-7-1-#4, making it a maj7#11 with no 3rd.

1-2-5-6 could be a Major6/9 without the third, not terribly unusual. Could also be spelled 3-4-7-1 for a min7 11.

1-2-3-6: again, a 6/9 on the 1, or a min11 if respelled

1-6-7 = Maj13 ... or... min7 with no 5th

1-2-3 and 1-2-7 = maj7add9 probably
Last edited by cdgraves at Sep 21, 2013,
#9
Quote by cdgraves
You can list endless chord formulae each with as many possible interpretations as notes in the chord, but nothing is definitive without context: what's the bass playing? What are the chords before and after? What's the key? What's the melody doing?

How you get to a chord tells you more about it than the actual spelling. As long as you can convince the listener that some goofy dissonant chord actually functions on the given root, that's the root.


Quick advices:

1) learn about chord inversions, because many of your listed formulae are standard chords in inversion. You're just spelling them based on the "wrong" root

2) Get used to spelling chord tones in chordal fasion rather than scalar. 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 is how scales are spelled. Chords are spelled in thirds: 1-3-5-7-9-11-13.

Notice the lack of 2, 4, and 6 - those are used is pretty specific circumstances, usually where you're substituting a chord tone (2 subs for 1, 4 subs for 3, 6 for 7). Don't use 2, 4, and 6 unless you know why you're doing it. Generally if you have a root, third, and 7th, anything else will be a 9, 11, or 13 (or alteration of the 5th).


Usually need a third before you can have an 11th, and natural 11ths are pretty unusual on Maj7 chords. I'd call it Maj7sus4 without a compelling reason otherwise. #11 is different.

Maj7sus2 would be spelled 2-3-5-7. Sus typically refers to a note a step above the normal chord tone, because there's an expectation that it's going to resolve down. If it's non-resolving, I'd call it a rootless 9th chord.

Those other formulae you listed really depend on context to determine the root. The lowest note doesn't need to be the root.

1-2-4-5 makes more sense re-spelled 4-5-7-1, making it a [dominant]7sus4. I mean you can have a chord spelled 1-2-4-5, but you'd need to somehow convince the listener the lowest note is actually the root.

1-3-4-7 is likely a Maj7add11, though it's a bit unusual. Could be re-spelled as 5-7-1-#4, making it a maj7#11 with no 3rd.

1-2-5-6 could be a Major6/9 without the third, not terribly unusual. Could also be spelled 3-4-7-1 for a min7 11.

1-2-3-6: again, a 6/9 on the 1, or a min11 if respelled

1-6-7 = Maj13 ... or... min7 with no 5th

1-2-3 and 1-2-7 = maj7add9 probably

I was talking about the notes in different order. I mean, if the notes in that first chord (1-4-5-7) were C, F, G and B, you could organize them so that the chord was 1-3-4-b7 (TS said "The other possibilities would be 1-2-4-5, 1-3-4-7, 1-2-5-6"). Then it would be G11. When I play the chord, to me it sounds like G11 but that might be because I'm most familiar with that sound. I wasn't talking about 1-4-5-7 chord, I was talking about 1-3-4-b7 chord that can be built using the same notes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
Sorry for taking so long to get back to this post. Thanks everyone for responding!

Those chord formulas were part of the harmony in a song that I was writing which is sadly at a different house right now.

When I get back to that house I'll check it out and see which one of these chord formulas apply the best according to the context.

A lot of people in this thread suggested that one of the chords could possibly be a Maj7sus4.

My question is, is it possible for a chord to be any type of "sus" chord without there being a resolution?

Because In the song I didn't include Maj7>Maj7sus4. Rather it was simply the Maj7sus4.

Im sorry that I cant remember the rest of the context but i'll get back to you guys on that.

Also graves I would really appreciate it if you would elaborate on the "scalar" fasion of spelling chords vs the "chordal" fashion.

I thought that inversions were naturally spelt using the numbers 1-4-6 etc... I understand that this could also be 1-11-13. How should I decide when to use the inversion spelling vs the extended chord spelling?

For example you say that "1-6-7 = Maj13" wouldn't it be necessary for their to be a 13 in the chord for it to be considered a 13 chord? Or is it okay to use a lower number like 6 to substitute as the 13 since they are essentially the same note.
Last edited by dannydawiz at Sep 22, 2013,
#11
Octave doesn't necessarily matter. The 13th doesn't have to be a 13th above the root. Often you'll see extended harmony voicings without roots or 5ths (because another instrument is already playing the root).
#12
I understand what you're saying thanks for elaborating on that.

I really need to get another harmony book to brush up on my inversions and extended chords.

Harmony is really starting to get more confusing now that I'm starting to view it as "all instruments combined" vs one instrument.

As well as with these inversions. Is there any book or resource that you would refer me to check out?