#1
How do the reissue super reverbs/bassman compare to the originals? Are the originals okay to gig with or do they break down and have problems? Also, what does silverface/blackface etc mean tonal wise? Thanks.
#2
Fender amplifiers are proven road warriors. As long as an old Fender amp has been properly taken care of, it should be quite reliable. The new ones are at least as reliable and sturdy as are the old ones. They use some different components than do the amps made in the 1950s and 1960s, but fundamentally they are the same. The term "Silverface" Fender amp refers to amps made between 1967 and 1981, as opposed to the earlier "Blackface: amps that came after the Tweed-covered amps of the 1950s (about 1964, I believe). They had some changes made to their designs to eliminate potential problems in the signal chain. In specific amps, such as the Twin Reverb, they also had more wattage. The names refer to the color of the control panel on the amp: "Blackface" amps had (and still have) black-colored control panels. "Silverface" amps had silver-colored control panels. Fender went back to the "Blackface" design in the 1980s (after the "Red Knob" amps), as many of their current amps are reissues.

Is there a difference in tone? Well; that is largely in the ears of the person hearing them. Some say that the "Silverface" amps were brighter, with less warmth and more high end. Other people would disagree. As long as you stick to the time-tested standard models, you really cannot go wrong with a Fender amplifier.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#3
Quote by hahaha15
How do the reissue super reverbs/bassman compare to the originals?


they have a very similar circuit topology, but use some different parts (speakers, tubes, output transformers) and are made with different methods (new fenders are PCB while old ones tend to be mounted on turret boards).

there is differences in tone i am sure, but there was differences in tones from one fender amp to another. they were constantly tweaking the circuit and using different OEM throughout their pre-CBS history.

imo a new fender amp is a bit expensive for what it is and the older will keep more value.

Quote by hahaha15
Are the originals okay to gig with or do they break down and have problems?


i have quite a few older amps and i gig with them, but i also have a good tech that usually fixes them up for me. usually older amps (pre-80's) tend to at least need a cap job as older capacitors don't tend to last to present day too well.

Quote by hahaha15
Also, what does silverface/blackface etc mean tonal wise? Thanks.


they are era's of fender amp, the name comes from the aesthetics but 'tonal wise' it usually refers to the prominent circuit of the era.

Quote by FatalGear41
The term "Silverface" Fender amp refers to amps made between 1967 and 1981, as opposed to the earlier "Blackface: amps that came after the Tweed-covered amps of the 1950s (about 1964, I believe).


brownfaces (~'61 to '63) never get the love the deserve.
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#4
Quote by gumbilicious


brownfaces (~'61 to '63) never get the love the deserve.

They breakup easier so they aren't what people have come to expect from Fender. I like them.


The old Fenders had better components than the new ones, especially important things like the transformers. Replace the filter caps in an old Blackface or even a Silverface and I would expect it to outlast the reissues.
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