#1
I plan on buying a new guitar soon, and I was wondering: Is there any good reason to get a set/neck through over a bolt on? One of the guitars I am looking at buying (Schecter Banshee FR-6 Passive) has a bolt on neck, but most other guitars I see for around that price and higher have neck throughs/set necks. Would a bolt on have bad tone compared to the other 2 options? Or would a bolt on be better, as you could change the neck and adjust the neck?

Thanks.
#3
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#4
Quote by hminh87
We really don't have to answer this question since it has been asked so many times times before. Please use the search bar for this.

Well yes, I know, but I was kinda hoping someone would shed some light of the guitar of choice I plan on buying, whether they would recommend, say no, etc.. But I understand what you are saying. I know the question has been asked thousands of times.
#5
Get whatever one is on the guitar you like the most, odds are you wont hear a difference if much anyways. I personally believe set neck is the way to go, or even neck through but that is less common. I have heard that set neck and neck through have better sustain, but the same can be said about stopbar tailpieces and string through body. There are only three things you really have to keep in mind.

-Neck through guitars are essentially pooched if you break the neck
-Set neck guitars cost a lot of money to repair if you break the neck
-Bolt on neck guitar can get severely screwed up if the pitch of the neck pocket is changed or a defective neck is put on the guitar.

Everyone has their own opinion but if any of these methods didn't provide a solid reliable neck on a guitar the manufacturers would have changed the design. If the action is right, the intonation is correct and she feels great in your hands you shouldn't be concerned with much else.
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#6
I think a test was done showing that all things being equal, bolt on builds have the best sustain.

Problem is that all things are never equal. Even between identical models.

I think the most important part of heel choice is comfort (and by extension, upper fret access) - the traditional block bolt on heel is pretty terrible. A Neck through or an AANJ style bolt on heel will give you access to the entire neck with no problems. A blockier heel or a set neck build will not have as good of access.

Second choice is about aesthetics.
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#7
ability to replace the neck
easy - impossible
bolt-on, set, neck through

sustain
short to long
bolt-on = set, neck through

comfort
least - most
bolt-on, set, neck through

if it has 24 fret's your gonna want at least a set neck. (the reason fender doesn't make 24 fret guitars)
unless it's got some special bolt-on layout like the Nuno Bettencourt (sp?) Washburn model
some radical bolt-on patterns are as accessible as a neck through.

supposedly bolt-on's have more snap, but that could be because most of the bolt-on necks are full maple fender necks.
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#8
I can't tell the difference sound wise, maybe I'm just not paying attention. Technical issues, now the differences are like night and day.
#9
Quote by KerNeL_KLuTcH
sustain
short to long
bolt-on = set, neck through

I don't agree. Maybe it's theoretically this way, or my guitars are different than the rest of the world. . I have two bolts and one neck through at the moment. If anything the neck through has less sustain.

Quote by KerNeL_KLuTcH
comfort
least - most
bolt-on, set, neck through

This I think is more of dependent on your style or even your ability. Clearly a neck through will be easier, but I have no trouble reaching or playing any notes because of the heel, and honestly have never even thought about it as a negative either way.

Not saying you're wrong as probably most would agree with you, but I have to say it's more of an individual thing than matter of fact.
#10
also the feel is important. as well as the access a neck thru just feels solid. I played the three types of neck and I love the solidity of the neck thru.
#11
Quote by Offworld92
I think a test was done showing that all things being equal, bolt on builds have the best sustain.


Ya know, just to clear that up. A guy built a single-string fixture using a bolt-on construction (not a guitar, mind you) and a second one using a sort of set neck construction. Neither were guitars, neither had any of the goods common to guitars and there really wasn't a body on either of them. He did no scientific measurements. He recorded the sound from each of them (using no particularly scientific way of plucking them equally) and played the recording back to a few people (and we're talking less than 10), some of whom said they thought the first fixture might have had more sustain. He then wrote an article and published that article in his own publication. If you want a copy of the actual article, you have to pay him for a copy of his magazine. Otherwise, you get a five-sentence synposis.

So that's what "I think a test was done" really means.
#12
I personally prefer neck-through guitars. Most of mine have outstanding upper fret access and are extremely comfortable to use in the upper reaches compared to the truly clunky neck heels that some (Ah Say, SOME) bolt and set-neck guitars exhibit. In the long run, it really doesn't seem to me that bolt necks give you crappy tone compared to set or neck-throughs, and my latest guitar (due to be picked up tomorrow) happens to be a bolt-neck (one of the few I have).
#13
Outside of the feel of the neck-body joint, it really doesn't make any difference in my experience. A well-assembled set-neck will have just as good transfer as a well-assembled bolt-neck, which will have just as good transfer as a well-assembled neck-thru.

If it were nothing but a positive alteration to the sustain, there's no reason that companies would still use bolt-on and set-neck builds on $2,000+ instruments, or for any artist to have one on their signature instrument. It's all about comfort, the idea that X type sounds/sustains better than Y type is as big a myth as the idea that thin necks = instant shred skills and comfort, or that stainless steel frets ruin tone.
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#14
set neck, deep tenon, hyde glue.


or just slap 4 drywall screws through a plate.


so the debate rages on.
#15
The ability to replace a bolt-on isn't necessarily a pro. Just because you can replace it doesn't mean you can get a replacement. Don't mind the bolt-on neck. It's just as good as anything else. The main difference will be in the tone and that doesn't even matter since Schecter doesn't make the same guitar with a different neck-joint. And the neck joint probably won't hinder anything. The lower horn will be the limiting factor to upper fret access more than the neck joint. I think the main advantage the the bolt-on in the Schecters case is the neck finish. It's doesn't seem glossy.
#16
I personally prefer bolt-on necks because of the ease of repair should something go wrong.
#17
Quote by dspellman
Ya know, just to clear that up. A guy built a single-string fixture using a bolt-on construction (not a guitar, mind you) and a second one using a sort of set neck construction. Neither were guitars, neither had any of the goods common to guitars and there really wasn't a body on either of them. He did no scientific measurements. He recorded the sound from each of them (using no particularly scientific way of plucking them equally) and played the recording back to a few people (and we're talking less than 10), some of whom said they thought the first fixture might have had more sustain. He then wrote an article and published that article in his own publication. If you want a copy of the actual article, you have to pay him for a copy of his magazine. Otherwise, you get a five-sentence synposis.

So that's what "I think a test was done" really means.




So yeah... Things are never all being equal.
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#18
Quote by Lvl 4 Hencman
I personally prefer bolt-on necks because of the ease of repair should something go wrong.


That's sort of like wearing galoshes in the Sahara in case of rain.

I have never needed to replace the neck on a guitar.
#19
Quote by dspellman
That's sort of like wearing galoshes in the Sahara in case of rain.

I have never needed to replace the neck on a guitar.


And a set-neck is like gluing on your shoes.
#20
Quote by peskypesky
And a set-neck is like gluing on your shoes.


I like that, though I think of it more as having hooves from the get-go.

Okay, so what's the metaphor for a neck-through?
#21
Quote by Masoo2
I plan on buying a new guitar soon, and I was wondering: Is there any good reason to get a set/neck through over a bolt on?


yeah, if you prefer them
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#22
I own one of each and the only real difference I see like others mentioned is the upper fret access, which I'm no lead player and rarely go much beyond the 19th or so it doesn't matter to me. Visually I love my neck-thru most followed by set then bolt and personally I like the painted/finished necks which the set and thru have vs the finish on most natural bolt-on's