#1
I do it by moving my finger up and down but I heard that's not the correct way of doing it. What's the correct way of applying vibrato to a string?
#2
Well, there's a few different ways that I've seen players do it. As for me, I "wiggle" my wrist as I apply it. Since I don't have a guitar right next me, it's a bit hard to picture my exact technique for it.
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#3
what exactly do you mean by "up and down"? "Up and down" parallel to the neck? "Up and down" perpendicular to the neck?

There's a fair chance that any time anyone says something is "wrong" (at least in regards to music and/or music technique) they're talking nonsense, though.
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#4
Quote by GuitarMusic360
I do it by moving my finger up and down but I heard that's not the correct way of doing it. What's the correct way of applying vibrato to a string?


Yes moving your finger up and down isnt the correct way for many reasons: precision,stability,no anchor point.The most effective way to do it is like turning the doorknob.its the same motion the diff is that your hand isnt closed(of course its not its holding the guitar ),your thumb is over the neck for leverage and your fingers dont push at all but remain stationary.The whole movement is generated by the forearm and the wrist with the thumb working as an anchor...

So grab the guitar,fret the note you want to bend but instead you pushing your finger up and down leave it still and try to bend the note by turning the doorknob,twisting your forearm and your wrist.It ll be difficult and crappy at first but when you get used to it you ll see why its more precise .
Last edited by Dreamdancer11 at Sep 20, 2013,
#5
^ that too

I didn't realise he meant actually using his finger to do all of it (i.e. no wrist). I assumed (maybe correctly; maybe incorrectly) that he was worried that the problem was that he was doing it in the wrong direction
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
depends how much vibrato I want really. up and down for a little bit, circular finger motion for more, and wrist for lots. wouldn't call it correct just what i use.
#8
If you achieve the sound you want and it doesn't feel uncomfortable then you're doing it right. Generally, it doesn't matter how you do something, as long as it's efficient and you achieve the sound you want.

The movement should be from the wrist, the elbow or the whole arm. From the fingers produces a weak and uncontrolled vibrato. The door handle is the easiest way to describe it. However, there are many ways of doing it. Watch people who have a vibrato you like and turn the sound off. Helps me loads.