#1
Are you able to control the sounds with a mixer better or is it really just the same thing as a head?
#2
You need a mixer to get a good sound. A mixer has Mic pre-amps an amp does not.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#3
By head, do you mean a box type mixer (as opposed to one that lays flat on a table) or a guitar/bass amp head?
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#4
Well; a mixer is just that: a device that mixes the audio inputs that are fed into it. With it, you can tweak the EQ, add effects, isolate one or more signals, and send the signals to various places (that are connected to the mixer, such as speaker cabinets). Now, in order to do any of those things, you will need an amplifier. Most mixers have no power amplifiers; just a mic pre-amp at best. Therefore, you need a power amp. They are called "Power Amps" because that is all they do: they amplify. They have no EQ or other controls with which to shape the sound. They have a volume knob (or two, if it is a stereo power amp).

Some mixers are known as "Powered Mixers" because they have a power amp (or up to four) built-in, so they do not need an external power amp. These are usually rackmount units; about 12 to 16 channels maximum, but the good ones work great, have plenty of channels for a band and save you a lot of trouble when setting up your P.A. They also save a fair amount of space.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#5
Quote by FatalGear41
Well; a mixer is just that: a device that mixes the audio inputs that are fed into it. With it, you can tweak the EQ, add effects, isolate one or more signals, and send the signals to various places (that are connected to the mixer, such as speaker cabinets). Now, in order to do any of those things, you will need an amplifier. Most mixers have no power amplifiers; just a mic pre-amp at best. Therefore, you need a power amp. They are called "Power Amps" because that is all they do: they amplify. They have no EQ or other controls with which to shape the sound. They have a volume knob (or two, if it is a stereo power amp).

Some mixers are known as "Powered Mixers" because they have a power amp (or up to four) built-in, so they do not need an external power amp. These are usually rackmount units; about 12 to 16 channels maximum, but the good ones work great, have plenty of channels for a band and save you a lot of trouble when setting up your P.A. They also save a fair amount of space.



Only thing I can add is that if he's referring to a 'head' for a PA he's most likely talking about a power amp. I've never heard it called that, but I could see why someone might.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#6
Define what you mean by "head".
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#7
Quote by Cathbard
Define what you mean by "head".

+1

As I said, I could see a PA's power amp being called that (particularly by guitarists who are used to having a head and a speaker cabinet for their amp) but that isn't really appropriate terminology...
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!