#1
I am trying to learn more theory, and I don't know what part this fits into.
If you play a major7 chord on 1 2 and 3 or 4 5 and 6, it fits, and I don't understand why.

Based on major or minor key formulas, what rules are being adopted or bent when a Maj7 is played on all three of those intervals?

EDIT: If I look at this as a IV, V, VI, but just make the VI a maj7 rather than minor, I guess that is the theory I am after. What is the theory underlying this?
Last edited by raredesign at Sep 21, 2013,
#2
Are you sure you're actually playing IV V and VI in relation to I?

Have you tried something like a Cmaj7, Gmaj7, Amaj7, Fmaj7 (I-V-VI-IV but with maj7) to check your resolution? If you're just playing a maj7 shape and moving it up a whole step twice then you may just be hearing the roots in a major scale pattern. Those chords aren't actually IV V and VI if they're not functioning as IV V and VI, they're serving a different function.
#3
bVI-bVII-I chord progression is really usual (for example C-D-E in E major) - for example check out "Kiss from a Rose" by Seal. But usually you don't hear bVImaj7-bVIImaj7-Imaj7 progressions. But if you are talking about regular major chords, not maj7 chords, it's pretty usual. It's just borrowing chords from the parallel minor key.

It could also be a (b)III-IV-V chord progression in a minor key (for example in A minor C-D-E and then it would resolve back to Am). It is used a lot. But again, they wouldn't be maj7 chords.

So are you sure you are talking about maj7 chords and not regular major chords?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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#4
Quote by MaggaraMarine
bVI-bVII-I chord progression is really usual (for example C-D-E in E major) - for example check out "Kiss from a Rose" by Seal. But usually you don't hear bVImaj7-bVIImaj7-Imaj7 progressions. But if you are talking about regular major chords, not maj7 chords, it's pretty usual. It's just borrowing chords from the parallel minor key.

It could also be a (b)III-IV-V chord progression in a minor key (for example in A minor C-D-E and then it would resolve back to Am). It is used a lot. But again, they wouldn't be maj7 chords.

So are you sure you are talking about maj7 chords and not regular major chords?


Thanks. So if Cmaj7, Dmaj7, Emaj7 and referenced as 4 5 6, that would be G right?
Otherwise, if as 1 2 3, would be Am.
What theory would that be if from both approaches?
If in G, would the E would be a Minor, but if I play it as maj7, what theory is that?
If in Am, it is major, minor, minor for 1 2 3, so what theory is that?

Thanks.
#5
Quote by raredesign
Thanks. So if Cmaj7, Dmaj7, Emaj7 and referenced as 4 5 6, that would be G right?
Otherwise, if as 1 2 3, would be Am.
What theory would that be if from both approaches?
If in G, would the E would be a Minor, but if I play it as maj7, what theory is that?
If in Am, it is major, minor, minor for 1 2 3, so what theory is that?

Thanks.

You are talking about out of context things. If you play Cmaj7 Dmaj7 Emaj7, why would it be in G? Only one of those chords completely fits the key signature (Cmaj7) - though that's not a reason for it not being in G major. But if you just play those chords, I don't think it resolves to G. So it wouldn't be IV-V-VI progression because it is not in G. You just don't say "this is in the key of G and I have these chords". How do you know it's in the key of G? It could be in the key of E minor and you just replaced the tonic with a major chord. And I already said that in my earlier post. I don't remember what it was called...

And no, in A minor the diatonic chords for I, II and III aren't major, minor and minor. They are minor, diminished and major. And again, if you played C-D-E, it wouldn't function as I-II-III. You would probably be in the relative minor key and it would be (b)III-IV-V (in A minor) that I also talked about in my previous post.

But again, it wouldn't be like that with maj7 chords. I'm talking about regular major chords, not maj7 chords. It doesn't sound that different though.

And these are out of context things. As I said, you can't just decide the key. The key is determined by the harmony. So if you play three chords, you listen to where it resolves to and that's your key.

Give me an example of a song where you hear those chords and it would be easier to analyze.

The only explanation is using accidentals. You are just using accidentals. Why it sounds good? Nobody can explain that. Certain things just sound good. Why does a major chord sound good? You just like the sound. Theory doesn't explain why something sounds good, it just explains what you have done. And if you play Cmaj7-Dmaj7-Emaj7, you are just using accidentals and I would guess you are in the key of E.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Sep 22, 2013,
#6
Quote by MaggaraMarine
.
And no, in A minor the diatonic chords for I, II and III aren't major, minor and minor. They are minor, diminished and major. And again, if you played C-D-E, it wouldn't function as I-II-III. You would probably be in the relative minor key and it would be (b)III-IV-V (in A minor) that I also talked about in my previous post.


Sorry for that brainfart -_-...I honestly didn't mean to type that. I know the harmonized major and minor key formula comfortably, as well as understand that three chords necessarily doesn't determine any one key as it could be mods of others as well. I meant it just as an example.
I don't have any songs on hand that I know of, and I simply hadn't spent much time using maj7 like this and was just fooling around for some jazzy sounds along with m7, 9ths, etc.

I think the accidentals and resolution is what I was looking for. I'll have to read about accidentals and see if that clears it up.

Thank you very much for your time.