#1
Would you guys mind checking the chord symbols in my notation just to make sure that I'm writing everything correctly?

I'm still getting used to inversions and I wasn't really sure how to notate them. I used the x/x method instead of figured bass since I figured that it would be more dated.

Does everything look okay?



Also there's a part where I went from a em/g to a G7. Is this okay to include a seventh chord even though the rest of the harmony involves triads?
Last edited by dannydawiz at Sep 22, 2013,
#2
There's not much to note. But watch out for enharmonic spellings, in the second last bar you've got a Db in the bass and a C# in the treble. That's superfluous.
It also looks to me that you aren't feeling/hearing the music, and you're just clicking things into Sibelius. Of course, I could be wrong. But this is the general impression I'm getting.
#3
Thanks for checking it out! I'll go back to fix that e harmonic spelling. I don't really know when to choose a flat or a sharp. Does it really matter all that much?

Also I'm curious about your last statement. I mean I wouldn't say I'm just clicking buttons but something about this notation must look artificial to you.

I value your opinion so would you mind clarifying a bit?

If its because of the last bars then I should note that those parts weren't finished. I copy and paste things before I actually edit the notes since its just easier to do that then having to add a new note every time.

The only bars of real relevance were the ones with the chord symbols added.
Last edited by dannydawiz at Sep 23, 2013,
#4
My statement was an attempt to enquire about your working methods. How are you conceiving this piece? And what style are you writting in. Because if you're aiming for a certain idiom, the it is perfectly okay to do what you are doing.
#5
I understand.

Although I can't say that I'm aiming for a specific style of music. The goal was to complete a basic piano piece while applying my new knowledge of inversions to help me in creating the harmony. I'm still very new to the instrument so Im not gonna say its even mediocre. The melody was written first and then the Harmony was written afterwards. The picture was just what I would've considered to be the intro melody.

I don't know much about structure when it comes to solo piano music which I would appreciate it if you could offer me some advice. However the plan was to do a very basic songwriting structure such as intro > verse > chorus etc... I hardly know if this is the way to go about it though as far as structure since its an instrumental piece.
#6
Then it is perfectly fine to do what you are doing, because it is simply an exploratory exercise. You could try just basic ABA form for this piece. But if you're already planning to write it in song form, then stick to that. Usually possible structures become apparent when you have your melody or conceptual idea, which can be anything.

Edit: Btw, I've never taught composition before. The way I'm taught is rather different to how you are learning. So I'm not sure what approach I should be taking when giving you advise.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Sep 23, 2013,
#7
I may just take that suggestion!

I did some research and that's what you guys consider ternary form. I always knew the term but never the actual format.

I don't mind however you decide to offer me your advice. I would never be picky about how someone presented their information if there intent was to teach me something. I don't take anyone's time for granted and I'm more thankful that you would even take the time of your day out to reply in the first place. Regardless if this is how you were taught of not.

About ABA format, are there any guidelines I should follow? Also how many bars does each section have to be?
#8
Quote by dannydawiz
Thanks for checking it out! I'll go back to fix that e harmonic spelling. I don't really know when to choose a flat or a sharp. Does it really matter all that much?

Basic rule of sharps and flats: You can only have ONE of each letter in a score.

Say you write in the key of F, which has a Bb instead of B. In this piece, you want to play one note below this Bb. You would NOT want to write an A, you would write Bbb. Even though the sound and fret (or key, etc) is A, you would notate it as a Bbb.

Having to read notes heads that are on the same line but with different accidentals is confusing. Going, "Oh, a G two half steps down" is much easier.

EDIT: I apologize for leaving this confusing. This deals mostly chords, where stacking notes in thirds is how chords are built.
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Last edited by rockingamer2 at Sep 23, 2013,
#9
For the form you can do whatever you like. You do not need to stick to tradition, we're in the 21st century now, not the 17th haha.
#10
Quote by rockingamer2
Basic rule of sharps and flats: You can only have ONE of each letter in a score.

Say you write in the key of F, which has a Bb instead of B. In this piece, you want to play one note below this Bb. You would NOT want to write an A, you would write Bbb. Even though the sound and fret (or key, etc) is A, you would notate it as a Bbb.

Having to read notes heads that are on the same line but with different accidentals is confusing. Going, "Oh, a G two half steps down" is much easier.


What the hell are you on about, please re-read what you've just written.
#11
Quote by rockingamer2
Basic rule of sharps and flats: You can only have ONE of each letter in a score.

Say you write in the key of F, which has a Bb instead of B. In this piece, you want to play one note below this Bb. You would NOT want to write an A, you would write Bbb. Even though the sound and fret (or key, etc) is A, you would notate it as a Bbb.

Having to read notes heads that are on the same line but with different accidentals is confusing. Going, "Oh, a G two half steps down" is much easier.

What? Seriously what?

In the key of F there is an A in the key signature so why wouldn't you just write it as an A? Dude are you trolling?

Mindfvck

If there's a C# and Db in one chord, you want to use either C# or Db, depending on the situation. But not both of them. That's an A major chord so you want to use C#, not Db in the bass. Also, usually ascending lines use sharps (if you go chromatically up from C to D, you usually go like C - C# - D, not C - Db - D).
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Sep 23, 2013,
#12
Quote by MaggaraMarine
What? Seriously what?

In the key of F there is an A in the key signature so why wouldn't you just write it as an A? Dude are you trolling?

In some cases you are required to use double flats or double sharps. For instance, a Cdim7 chord is spelled C Eb Gb Bbb (1 b3 b5 bb7) because chords are built by thirds:

C D E F G A B

not

C D E F G A B
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
Last edited by rockingamer2 at Sep 23, 2013,
#13
^ Yes, of course but this song doesn't have diminished 7th chords. Your first post was really confusing because you didn't mention diminished chords. Also, double flats outside of diminished 7th chords are really rare.

And this part

"Say you write in the key of F, which has a Bb instead of B. In this piece, you want to play one note below this Bb. You would NOT want to write an A, you would write Bbb. Even though the sound and fret (or key, etc) is A, you would notate it as a Bbb."

doesn't make any sense to me. If you are in F major, you most certainly want to use an A, unless you have a C diminished 7th chord. But why are we talking about diminished 7th chords in the first place? It would be a lot more confusing to use a Bbb instead of an A in a song that is in F major. F minor is a different story but still I would say using a Bbb in an F minor song is really rare. But you didn't even say if the key was F major or minor. I would guess your post really confuses TS.

But TS, you asked when to use sharps or flats. You need to look at what chords you have in the song. In this case it's an A major chord so you want to use a C# not a Db (and certainly not both of them). And as I said in my earlier post, usually ascending lines use sharps. Your bassline in bars 9-10 goes chromatically up from B to D so you want to use a C# (and also, you are using the same chord progression as earlier that had an A major chord - that's why you want to use C#).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
Quote by rockingamer2
For instance, a Cdim7 chord is spelled C Eb Gb Bbb (1 b3 b5 bb7) because chords are built by thirds:


It's spelled that way because regardless of the actual pitch, B is the 7th of C. So if you want a C half-diminished 7, you alter that B to a Bb. If you want a fully diminished chord, you bring the Bb to a Bbb. Even though it's enharmonically equivalent to an A, it's functioning as the diminished 7th, so it's still notated as a Bbb. That only applies in regards to spelling certain chords. If you're in F major, your F chord has an A in it, not a Bbb. A is the third, Bbb is the flatted fourth.
Quote by stealstrings





C:
Last edited by InstantMustache at Sep 29, 2013,
#15
Quote by rockingamer2
Basic rule of sharps and flats: You can only have ONE of each letter in a score.



You're talking about key signature, not the whole score.

You use whatever sharps or flats are appropriate to the harmony. If you're playing in C and use an E7, you're going to have a G#, because E7 is spelled E G# B D.

If you're using accidentals in a melody over a chord without any accidentals, then you use the accidental that most clearly fits in with the melodic motion. Sharps are usually used if you're ascending, flats descending. And use a different note when possible - ie, don't say "G-Gb-G" when "G-F#-G" makes it more clear what the melody is doing.
#16
Quote by rockingamer2
Basic rule of sharps and flats: You can only have ONE of each letter in a score.

Say you write in the key of F, which has a Bb instead of B. In this piece, you want to play one note below this Bb. You would NOT want to write an A, you would write Bbb. Even though the sound and fret (or key, etc) is A, you would notate it as a Bbb.

Having to read notes heads that are on the same line but with different accidentals is confusing. Going, "Oh, a G two half steps down" is much easier.

EDIT: I apologize for leaving this confusing. This deals mostly chords, where stacking notes in thirds is how chords are built.

No, I think you have a pretty serious concussion. You might want to get that checked out, BTW.

General rule of sharps and flats is that if you are going up, sharp, going down, flat, unless it's a half step that occurs in the key itself. At least, that's how I was taught. But it makes WAY more sense than this post does.
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Last edited by Mister A.J. at Sep 29, 2013,