#1
Can anyone give me any pointers for playing jazz music? I am a self taught guitarist with only metal, hard rock, and punk rock in my bag of tricks, and I just became a music major at my local community college. The only option for guitarists to play their instrument in college here is to join the jazz ensemble, and I have been working on the audition piece for the past six hours, and I have only gotten the chords and the little bit of a solo looking part written as a tab... but speed is required for the piece. Can anyone help me out?
#2
You said you have the solo written out in tab? Can you read music? If you can't this will be a MAJOR asset in your jazz playing. Learn every note in every position of the fret board if you haven't already. A guitarist who can read has a huge advantage above most guys. Study some theory on your common jazz chords. Really practice you syncopated rhythms as well. When it comes to speed, just practice at a tempo that is comfortable for you and causes no tension. Once you feel good at that tempo, slowly increase it a bit. Speed takes time so don't expect instant results within a couple hours. Hope this helps. I'm also self taught metal-head who plays in a jazz band and am just speaking from personal experience.
#3
Listen to a ton of jazz and emulate those rhythms. Learn to move the bass notes. As for speed just practice that style at slow pace and it will come to you. The speed in jazz doesnt translate well from metal as its very different timing.
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#4
Can't help you too much with the technique aspect, as that only comes from time invested. But in terms of theory, play around with chord inversions a LOT. Move one note of the chord and see what that does to it. Especially the bass note, as was said. Get to know the sound of 7ths and 9ths, really get close with them, as you're gonna hear that sort of thing quite frequently.
#5
I forgot to mention, when it comes to improvisations, don't be afraid to take the melody of the song and incorporate an altered version of it into the solo. I learned that jazz musicians often like to steal from one another, which is fine as long as you put your own twist on the idea.
#7
oh god one of these.

Just get lessons man. You've got a lot to cover. Be ready to suck at first. Don't take any of this personally;

- Work with a metronome on 2 and 4; your swing is almost certainly lacking.
- Learn drop 2 voicings of ma7, mi7, dom7, mi7(b5) chords (to start)
- You need to learn every key. Start mapping out F, Bb, and Eb.
- Learn all your modes and your ma7, mi7, dom7 and mi7(b5) arpeggios on all notes. Learn the spellings too.
- Start learning theory. Start with scale spelling or if you need to, reading treble and bass clef.
- Learn the blues in C, F, Bb, Eb and G (to start)
- Start listening to jazz and take some basic ear training/theory so you can start to transcribe.
- Learn to sight read.
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Last edited by British_Steal at Sep 24, 2013,
#8
Cookie monster tends to be frowned upon in jazz. So I'd probably minimise that at your audition.
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#10
Quote by KevinGoetz
Can't help you too much with the technique aspect, as that only comes from time invested. But in terms of theory, play around with chord inversions a LOT. Move one note of the chord and see what that does to it. Especially the bass note, as was said. Get to know the sound of 7ths and 9ths, really get close with them, as you're gonna hear that sort of thing quite frequently.



If Anything I would recommend against changing the bass note

You will change chords and learn really nothing.

You need to learn the different altered forms against the same bass note, to learn to hear the difference between diminished and augmented and flat/sharp 9's.

Anyway for someone starting Jazz I'd recommend entirely against learning that for the moment, and first learn to play every inversion of just the Minor/Major/Dominant/DIminished 7th chords.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Sep 25, 2013,
#11
Quote by HailFire5150
You said you have the solo written out in tab? Can you read music? If you can't this will be a MAJOR asset in your jazz playing. Learn every note in every position of the fret board if you haven't already. A guitarist who can read has a huge advantage above most guys. Study some theory on your common jazz chords. Really practice you syncopated rhythms as well. When it comes to speed, just practice at a tempo that is comfortable for you and causes no tension. Once you feel good at that tempo, slowly increase it a bit. Speed takes time so don't expect instant results within a couple hours. Hope this helps. I'm also self taught metal-head who plays in a jazz band and am just speaking from personal experience.

thanks for the advice, so very much. I really appreciate it.
#13
Get a teacher. No better way to learn institutional music than from someone who was education institutionally.

The first thing you should do is spend a good while reading through charts every day. Sit down for 30 minutes and just hack your way through the chords.

Start with just strumming the basic root position triad on the downbeat of every chord change. Add more interesting rhythms only after you can play through the changes. Once you've got your 7th chord inversions all figured out, you can start voice leading the chord changes.

Make sure you can read staff. Even if you're not good at sight reading, you will NEED to read notation to play jazz. There are really only like 4 great jazz players who never read music, and one or two of them were blind.

Once you can do those basics, work in your altered dominant chords. Form-based music is all about building up to the dominant, so make it count.

For technique, get used to using your left hand legato for pretty much everything. There's a basic exercise you can do called "strong beat/weak beat": when playing swing 8ths, you only pluck on the upbeats. Jazz phrases (and lots of Bach, interestingly) very frequently start on the upbeat in the middle of a measure and flow to the downbeat of the next chord change.

That's a lot of vague, disparate information, but it'll make more sense after you've learned a few things. Agai, definitely get a teacher.
#14
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Last edited by mdc at Sep 26, 2013,
#15
Listen to jazz. Feel the jazz. Play what you feel. Learn the theory to what you feel/like to hear. Repeat.
#16
Umm when you say that you play metal, do you mean you just copy a lot of tabs? And those tabs just happen to be metal?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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