#1
Well since I bought my Tak-G on 9/4, I have been able to get Country Roads about 90% down. Getting better at switching chords to the point it almost sounds fluent. Also working on Lean On Me and Folsom Prison Blues for variety. Am even able to hit a decent F chord about 40% of the time. Start lessons on Monday and think that will be good for I have the feeling I have skipped over the basics that I need. I do have two questions though...1) As a beginner is it alright to look at the fret board for fingering or should I be trying to hit chords without looking and only peek after I butcher the chord? 2) I find chords like A major hard to sustain because I have to push down extra hard on the A string to get a clean crisp note. I find this problem when I have to finger 2 or more strings side by side. Is this because I have not developed the strength in my hand yet? Would a finger exerciser that I could use when I can not play help? I am averaging 1 1/2 - 3 hours of practice time per day.
#2
hmm... i'm not going to answer those as #1 they have variable opinions and #2, your new teacher will skin me alive.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#3
Quote by indianriver
Well since I bought my Tak-G on 9/4, I have been able to get Country Roads about 90% down. Getting better at switching chords to the point it almost sounds fluent. Also working on Lean On Me and Folsom Prison Blues for variety. Am even able to hit a decent F chord about 40% of the time. Start lessons on Monday and think that will be good for I have the feeling I have skipped over the basics that I need. I do have two questions though...1) As a beginner is it alright to look at the fret board for fingering or should I be trying to hit chords without looking and only peek after I butcher the chord? 2) I find chords like A major hard to sustain because I have to push down extra hard on the A string to get a clean crisp note. I find this problem when I have to finger 2 or more strings side by side. Is this because I have not developed the strength in my hand yet? Would a finger exerciser that I could use when I can not play help? I am averaging 1 1/2 - 3 hours of practice time per day.

Well, as they say, (or do they?), "fools rush in where ex-marines fear to tread".

No, you shouldn't be looking at the fret board. It's the same as touch typing, whereas you look at the material to type, and not at the keys. Look if you choose, but it eventually might hold you back. OTOH, there are position markers on the side of the neck facing up. So, they will be able to guide you to position. But, if you try to play standing up, you'll quickly realize why you shouldn't learn by directly watching your fingers on the fret board.

(I've gotten guilty of this in my old age, as I play sitting down all the time. Sometimes I slouch and slant the guitar out at the bottom, so's I can see my fingers real well. Not good. The angle of your wrist becomes too acute in this position as well ).

My original teacher explained how to play with the guitar behind your neck. "First find your position, then put the guitar behind you. No one has eyes in the back of their head. I really more than suck at that. I'm just relaying the story.

Many people think that you only need callouses on the tips of your fingers. They're wrong . You also need them, (at minimum), all the way up your index finger to facilitate barre chords.

Hand strength also is necessary. There isn't a way to measure it for playing the guitar. Were you lifting weights, your progress would be more readily measured. Not so when you're dealing with an exercise that amounts to low weight, but a massive number of repetitions.

So, use hand exerciser if you like, but IMHO, it won't work your hands in the same plane of motion that playing will, and it certainly WON'T give you the callouses you need.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 26, 2013,