#1
Hello,

I have a J & D Luthiers JD-LSC LP electric guitar and for amp I have the Peavey Vypyr 15. What do you think about them;

I am a complete beginner in music and electric guitar so i would like to suggest me books for learning electric guitar, and for theory of music.

Also, because the electric guitar is completely out of tune can you tell me how to tune my electric guitar;

Is there any thing i must buy in the start?

How can i start learning electric guitar ?

Thanks in advance,
Panagiotis
#2
I haven't tried either of those. The vypyr gets a good rep as a beginner practice modelling amp, though.

i found the complete idiot's guide to music theory to be good. it's not guitar-based, it's more piano, but the piano keyboard is laid out much more sensibly when it comes to learning where all the notes are (to clarify- i'm not saying you should learn piano or anything like that).

I'm not so well up on beginner electric guitar books as i played for a while before buying any books. Amazon has a good selection of books and you can look inside a lot of them to see what they're like before you buy anything.

I'd probably get some kind of "complete beginner course"- I've seen several books like that on amazon when i've been looking at books, but I haven't bought them myself.

In addition I would probably also get a book which explains movable chord shapes to you. That way you can learn the maximum number of chords for the minimum amount of effort. Troy Stetina's book on barre chords is pretty good; rikky rooksby's book on chord construction is pretty good, too ("The chord master") as it has a section on movable chords, among other things. Barre chords can be tricky at the start, though- I'd only get a book like that in addition to a beginner method/lessons type of book and a book on music theory (since often chord books don't have the most in-depth explanations of theory).

Regarding what gear you need, I'd get a tuner (chromatic is probably better for all the extra it costs). I'm guessing you have plectrums, a strap and a cable? If so, you don't really need anything else. A little guitar stand doesn't hurt if you don't have anywhere handy to keep your guitar.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
Quote by Amakatzis


Also, because the electric guitar is completely out of tune can you tell me how to tune my electric guitar;


Take the guitar to a guitar tech (or one of the salesmen at a guitar store) and tell them you don't know how to tune your guitar. They'll tune it for you in a few seconds.

Buy a tuner. They're cheap. You can even pick up a free (or cheap) app for your smartphone that will work as a tuner. Pull up one of the web pages that actually has a set of tones on it that will help you tune your guitar. Do Not Tune Your Guitar Too High -- you'll break strings. We've had beginners here who've tuned their guitar exactly one octave above where it should be.

Learn to read music and tab. There are apps for your smart phone that will show you chords, chord shapes and chord changes. There are "Lick of the Day" apps that will teach you, via short videos, certain bits and pieces from popular guitar-based songs.

Practice like a sumgun. Your fingertips will hurt for a while, then they'll toughen up and develop callouses.
#5
...get yourself a teacher/mentor.....do you have any guitar beginer Courses in your area, someone willing to help you...I´m not recommending some old guy that´s gunna make you play Childrens songs till you wanna set your whole rig on fire but someone that will show you the basics, help you out with tuning and setup and rub som knowledge of on you....I had my first guitar lesson when I was 6 and didn´t pick a guitar up again till I was 15 cause I hated playing classical shit on an acoustic. My mother found me a mentor that showed me some basics on the my new Electric guitar and made it fun.....scales come in real handy but that should be mixed up with some fun stuff!!!

as for the amp and guitar....you´ll figure out what´s best for you after a few years of playing.

good luck ;-)
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#6
Quote by Blackst4r
I´m not recommending some old guy that´s gunna make you play Childrens songs till you wanna set your whole rig on fire


I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
I have these and like them:

Chord Book:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0634041584/ref=oh_details_o05_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Roughly the same price as that chord poster with a LOT more chords in it. I use this a lot.

Music Theory Book:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/063406651X/ref=oh_details_o07_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It is focused on the guitar and has some exercises and stuff inside the book so it is sort of like a workbook from school.

Cleartune:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cleartune-chromatic-tuner/id286799607?mt=8

This is actually pretty accurate. It is on the more expensive side of apps and I am not sure if they have it for android or not but it is still cheap for what it is.

I have also been using this:

http://www.learnandmaster.com/guitar/

I actually like it more than justinguitar.com. The instructor is pretty clear and I feel like I make better progress with it than I did on Justin's site. It is a very solid box set. It isn't really cheap but I honestly think it is well worth it. You want to try and get the expanded set if you do buy it because there are more DVDs in it and I believe you can typically find it for $150 or less.

This set actually covers music theory as well.
Last edited by HippieMagic at Sep 25, 2013,
#8
Find a genre of music which interests you, and then practice it. For most Rock/Metal you can't go wrong with learning the Blues. If you learn theblues you're mostly nailing more than one genre of music in one..

If you want to play somethign else however, such as classical or folk then concentrate on that instead.

Also you should probably make a decision to learn rhythym guitar (chords) or lead (scales and riffs). And concentrate on one or the other until you've memorized some stuff and have it permanently burned into your brain. When you have it imprinted than you can start switching between the two.
Last edited by kingking22 at Sep 25, 2013,
#9
Quote by HippieMagic
I have these and like them:

Chord Book:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0634041584/ref=oh_details_o05_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Roughly the same price as that chord poster with a LOT more chords in it. I use this a lot.

Music Theory Book:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/063406651X/ref=oh_details_o07_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It is focused on the guitar and has some exercises and stuff inside the book so it is sort of like a workbook from school.


Only concern with that chord book (I have it too ) is that it's one of those "list loads of chords" books, rather than a book which explains why the chords are the way they are (which makes it easier to learn them).

Don't get me wrong, for all it costs it wouldn't hurt to have it, but a book which explains why chords are fingered the way they are, and which also gives you shapes which are movable (like the ones I listed) means you don't have to learn as much.

I've heard good things about that theory book (and that author) but I haven't read it.

oh yeah, chords and scales for guitar by david mead is quite good too on the theory side of things.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
Yeah I don't use the chord book to learn anything I just use it as a reference when I know what chord I need but don't know the actual fingering of that chord. For that it is great. The chord poster is like $7.50 in most places and I have seen it as high as $12. For that reason alone I recommend the book to anyone who plays.

I just bought Guitar Aerobics last night. It should be here today so we will see how that works out. I have read good things about it but I am not sure how well it will be for someone of my skill level.

The guitar theory book is large but not overly thick. I think it only has about 100 pages and a CD but it contains a lot of info. It almost seems like an overwhelming amount plus it has quizzes on top of it. It also shows tabs and notation as well as notes on the fretboard and all that fun stuff.
Last edited by HippieMagic at Sep 26, 2013,
#11
Quote by HippieMagic
(a) Yeah I don't use the chord book to learn anything I just use it as a reference when I know what chord I need but don't know the actual fingering of that chord. For that it is great. (b) The chord poster is like $7.50 in most places and I have seen it as high as $12. For that reason alone I recommend the book to anyone who plays.

(c) I just bought Guitar Aerobics last night. It should be here today so we will see how that works out. I have read good things about it but I am not sure how well it will be for someone of my skill level.

(d) The guitar theory book is large but not overly thick. I think it only has about 100 pages and a CD but it contains a lot of info. It almost seems like an overwhelming amount plus it has quizzes on top of it. It also shows tabs and notation as well as notes on the fretboard and all that fun stuff.


(a) yep agreed.

(b) yeah that does sound a lot. I suppose you could make the argument that if it's on the wall you will see it all the time and will be handier... but it does seem a lot for only a handful of chords.

Actually, that reminds me- someone on another forum posted a link to this website that has chord posters etc. like that one that you can download (free) and print out. Might be worth considering.

http://imgur.com/a/z8Eks#0

(c) I think I've come across that one in my browsing on amazon, but I haven't bought it Would be interested to hear what it's like.

(d) Yeah it does have a good rep.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#12
The first exercise for "beginners" in the Guitar Aerobics book is Alternate Picking.

Picking pattern is down up down up.

0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 12 0 0 0

This is on the high E string. Supposedly 10 reps starting with 40 bpm and increasing each time with your last being 112 bpm.

It then goes on to a String Skipping, String Bending, Arpeggio, Sweep Picking, Legato, then ends the week on a Rhythm exercise.
Last edited by HippieMagic at Sep 27, 2013,
#13
thanks

i already have the troy stetina speed mechanics for lead guitar book, so i'm guessing there's a fair bit of overlap there.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#14
I'd suggest searching You Tube and check out Marty Schwartz. ive been stuck on a few things in the past and his videos have gotten me outta the jam. Justin guitar is also very good.