Page 1 of 2
#1
For those of you who don't know me, my name is Gordon and I spend large parts of my week working in a guitar shop doing amp and guitar tech work. I have been playing for over 20 years and am also a gigging musician so I know a thing or two about how to get my gear just perfect.

Recently one of my Les Pauls made it onto the bench at the shop where I put in a grueling 5 hours hard work in depth setup to get it playing perfectly. It was suggested by my mates in the 'who to listen to' thread that I made a tutorial for our resource centre so here it is.

I'm leaving plenty of space for extra little tech and setup bits that I didn't need to do so that this can be a bit of a universal guide rather than Les Paul specific.

Please note that this guide is going to cover everything from basic setup through to fret dressing. There will be stages where if you are not confident in what you are doing you can make a guitar worse. If you don't feel you can do a good job, DON'T! I also obviously work in a guitar shop and have more tools than you would generally find in your gig bag, I'll include budget options where I can, but some things, particularly when it comes to the fret work, there aren't any cheap options - if you want a good finish you need the proper tools.

I'll be adding stages as I go throughout the day/tomorrow as I get them prepared.
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
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Last edited by GABarrie at Sep 26, 2013,
#2
The first thing I do is drop the neck pickup right down into its pickup ring as I'll be doing a fret dress, and I want to avoid the file taking the tops of the pike pieces off. Trust me, I've done it before when I first started fret work, don't risk it.



Next I mask off the top half of the body and over both pickups. Even though I shouldn't be anywhere near the bridge pickup it is still magnetic and I'm going to be creating lots of metal filings that just love to stick all over the pickups.



I am removing the nut here purely because if I was doing someone else's Epiphone the nut would need replacing and it's a good point to be taking it off.

The first step is it score all around the edges so when we knock it off we don't take the finish with it. We then put something hard up against it and tap that with a hammer. Nuts are generally super glued and it breaks with shock, not pressure. A tiny tap with a hammer will do a lot good than a slow strong push.





Next I check down the neck for gaps under the frets. These normally make for loose frets and there are several ways of dealing with them.



The first and more sane looking solution is to run superglue along them, let it suck into the gap, wipe it down, then scrape away any excess glue. The method I use is by far more fun. Firstly we support the neck firmly underneath with wooden blocks. Then we get a good hammer and a smaller wooden block and knock the frets in. If you're afraid of hitting your guitar with a hammer, I suggest you go and re-read the superglue idea.



At this point I'll take a smooth cut square file and roll back the edges of the fretboard binding to take any square edges off and make it much more rounded to the touch. Square edges are a big problem that Les Pauls often suffer from as well see more of them later.
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
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Last edited by GABarrie at Sep 26, 2013,
#3
Ok, next comes one of the tedious, long, boring bits that is nevertheless vitally important to get right. Masking off the fret board. This prevents damage from files and abrasives to the fretboard as well as keeping them free of any metal filings.

You want to get the masking tape up tight to the edges of the frets so there is no fretboard showing. I generally do this my putting one edge up of the tape against the fret allowing the other side to hang over the other fret, then tucking in the other edge and running along the fret with a sharp knife to cut it flush.





You want to avoid any folding, anything that can get in the way of the leveling file creates a bad fret dress and for this reason I try to keep the tape to one thickness.



Once it is all done you should have a fretboard completely covered in tape with all the lovely frets sticking out the top.

Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
Last edited by GABarrie at Sep 26, 2013,
#4
Earlier I said that Les Pauls suffer from issues with square edges, and we're about to fix the biggest one. Square fret edges. The finish on fret ends can be poor, especially on Import guitars and files at far to shallow an angle, creating sharp square corners at the ends for you hand to find while you're playing. This is not an easy task to fix and took me a good 90 minutes. It is, however, totally skippable if your frets don't bother you.



This is the first tool we run into that doesn't have a practical cheap option, a small fret dressing triangle file. It may look like a standard triangle file but it has the 3 edges ground off so you can run it along its edge without it cutting into anything. This is vital or we will end up taking chunks out of our fretboard fixing the fret ends. If you have the kit to grind the edges off then a small triangle file (second cut or smooth) will work, but else, you really need to proper tool.



I use the file to turn the square edges into semi circles, just work in curved strokes from the edge of the fret towards the middle of the end, then repeat for the other half of that end. I would have taken pictures of the process but I had to use both hands to do it.

You will need to invest a large amount of time making sure they are rounded and shaped nicely, you are aiming for a nice little dome at the ends of every fret.



You will find on set neck guitars that you won't get the file in properly when the body is in the way. I had to leave the higher frets on the bass side undone because of this, but as I can't get my hand where I can't get the file either this is purely a cosmetic issue.
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
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Last edited by GABarrie at Sep 26, 2013,
#5
Now on to the scariest part of fret work (the first 1 or 2 times you do it at least). Leveling the frets. This basically involves pushing a very flat file along all your frets repeatedly until they're all flat. This is another tool that really there isn't a good budget option for, properly flat files are tricky to come by, and the handle shape of a fret leveling file makes them much easier to use.

As a side note, if you've done any considerable damage to the masking tape rounding the fret ends you will need to remask before the crowning stage, it just tears up otherwise.



The first thing I do is to get a long straight edge and lay it over the frets. I then adjust the truss rod until the whole neck is perfectly straight by checking for rocking/gaps. This is much easier with a notched straight edge designed for leveling guitar necks, but we don't have one in the shop yet (it's on the Christmas list) so obviously this can be done with a decent straight edge.

The second thing I do is to mark the tops of all the frets with a sharpie, this lets you see what frets are getting filed and which are not due to being too low, or other frets being too high. I generally reapply the Sharpie after each stage of leveling.

I start with passes from the pickup end up to the nut covering the whole width of the frets, I do this twice and can start to see where the low areas are that are getting missed. Next I do some short passes localized to where there are high areas until it starts catching the low areas.

I reapply the Sharpie and do it all over again until there is no low areas and I just finish on the long passes.

This still isn't always perfect however, so I get a fret rocker, or any short straight edge will do, and check for any frets that are still high. Place it over 3 frets, if it rocks the middle fret is high.



This Les Paul still had a slightly high second fret so I filed it down with a triangle file until it is level.



That aspect of the fret dress is relatively quick and painless. Now comes the hard part, crowning the frets. This means taking those nasty flat tops and making the fret rounded again. For this we will need a triangle dress file, a slightly bigger one this time, but it still has it's edges ground off. You can use this bigger file for rounding the fret ends too (previous post), but it is much easier with the smaller file.



I use this file and run it down the edges of the fret, working a curve into it from both edges meeting in the middle. I work until I am left with a thin line of uncrowned fret which I just take off the top.

Good lighting is helpful here, above and slight behind you, as you can see all the scaring from the leveling file. The trick is to file out all the scarring that goes perpendicular to the frets. Anything left that runs in line with the fret that you can't sand out, even if it looks bad, you won't feel. The slightest nick running at right angles you will feel every time you bend past it.

The whole leveling and crowning takes another 90 minutes to do properly but in the end you should be left with some very level

Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
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Last edited by GABarrie at Sep 26, 2013,
#6
Well, the frets might be nicely rounded, but they're certainly not smooth, or shiny. The first thing I need to is buff them up with sand paper.

I give them a big scrub up and down (with the frets, not at right angles) with 400 grit. I then get more 400 grit, and using the pad of my finger as a soft sanding block, I give a good buff to the ends I rounded which will help smooth out any rough shapes in the lovely domes I shaped earlier.

The next step is to repeat going up through the grades of sandpaper, I did 600, 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500 on top of the 400 and that left a nice smooth finish on the frets.



I need to buff the frets to a nice shiny finish next, in the shop we use a Dremel with a polishing pad and metal polish. This is obviously a fairly expensive piece of kit and you can get a reasonable finish with 0000 grade steel wool.





I next take all the masking off the fretboard (make sure to leave it on the pickups if you're using 0000 to buff the frets) and take a nice smooth cut flat file and finish rolling back all the edges to make sure they are smooth. This also smooths out any damage that may have happened from the triangle files. You then need to go along the edges with the various grades of sandpaper. The downside is you need to buff the frets again and the masking isn't there anymore.

So we use a fret guard, which if you have proper ones is a piece of metal with a fret sized slot cut in the middle. If you don't have a proper one, cut a fret sized slot in a sheet of plastic with a craft knife. We position the guard so the fret shows through the slot and buff again.

Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
Last edited by GABarrie at Sep 26, 2013,
#7
We're into more standard setup territory now and every setup in the shop starts with a good clean. Dirt accounts for more wear on the guitar than anything else, sweat and grease burn through nitro finishes; it also corrodes strings which leads to fret wear (which leads to more fret dressing); corrosion on the bridge saddles break strings and dirt in the nut causes pinching and leads to tuning instability.

The first step is to clean off the fretboard. A good cleaner is needed here, I use Fender Custom Shop Fingerboard Remedy on rosewood boards (which is a Lemon Oil/Beeswax mix) and Big Bend's nut sauce on everything else.



A warning about lemon oil. Lemon oil is free of any acid and is completely pH neutral. However, many lemon oils on the market contain lemon juice as well (packed full of citric acid). Dunlop lemon oil isn't even lemon oil, it's mineral oil with lemon extracts (and plenty of citric acid too). If you insist on using lemon oil, the Fender Remedy is a good option as the beeswax provides a more wearing finish. The Planet Waves lemon oil is good too, but I would rather go for a violin/piano lemon oil product as they tend to be of a higher quality.

Tub it onto the fretboard with a clean cloth, we obviously have good microfibre cloths on the bench in the shop, but an old t-shirt will do. When the cleaning oil is applied the board will go all shiny and wet, if within 5 minutes it dries up then the board is dry and you will need to reapply it. Do this as many times as needed so the board keeps it's wet look for 5 minutes after application.



We also give the body a good clean, in the shop we use Big Bend's Gloss Sauce, but any cleaning product of your fancy will do, just make sure it's nitro safe if you have a nitro finish. We generally uses 3 cloths, one for applying, one for rubbing off and one for a final buff.

If you have a nitro/poly finished maple fretboard then you can just use the body cleaner for everything as it's all the same finish.
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
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Last edited by GABarrie at Sep 26, 2013,
#8
Well, we're into the final stages of my Les Paul, don't worry, that isn't where the thread is going to end, got plenty of other tips to share to get your guitar up to tip top shape, it's just that my LP doesn't need it, so it'll have to wait for the next guitar.

This stage is probably the most important and probably could have done with a tutorial all to itself - the actual setup. This is the only part of this guide that will need to be repeated on a regular basis. And even then a good setup will only need basic tweaking, mostly the neck relief which will vary with temperature. And with things like a tune-o-matic bridge it's very easy to mess up the bridge height catching the thumb wheels while cleaning.

This particular setup guide doesn't cover floating tremolos, I'll cover that in another post so if you need that info, you'll have to wait until I have one in the shop.

If you remember I took the nut off, if you didn't then you don't need to put it back. Nut cutting from scratch is a little specialist and deserves a separate post, so the next time I'm cutting one from scratch I'll make one. Fitting the nut on is quite simple a few small dabs of super glue, and hold it in place for a minute or so. Pressure is good for super glue setting so holding if for that minute really helps rather than just leaving it. If you are cutting one from scratch you only rough cut it at this point before fitting.



After the nut is on we string it up, I have here my favourite strings, DR Pure Blues. Gauge 11s so a little heavier than I usually use (I generally use 10s for standard) but it'll be going down to Eb when I get the electronics sorted in my other Les Paul so they're do fine.

For standard tuning I generally recommend 10s on 24.75" scales, 9s on 25.5" scales. for Eb 11s and 10s respectively. If you have flattened your neck for the fret dress then the addition of the tension in these strings provides pretty much the perfect neck relief without any adjustment at the truss rod.



We start the setup with the neck relief. That is to say the amount of curve in the neck, we want a little, but not a lot. This stops buzzing, improves intonation and makes the guitar more playable. I generally measure by fretting the first and 14th fret and measure the gap at the 7th. You are looking for about 0.15-0.25mm (0.006"-0.009") I personally prefer it closer to the 0.15mm side of things. A thickness gauge is good for this, if not you learn to guesstimate it.



Next comes a particularly tricky bit on a guitar that has a fixed radius bridge like the TOM, or non-height adjustable Floyd Roses, bridge radiusing. You would think a guitar like a Gibby/Epi Les Paul that comes with a 12" radius and make their own bridges the radius would be correct, think again. There's a reasonably easy trick to this so get your capo out (if you're one of these "die hard" players who refuses to get a capo because they are for sissies, good luck doing tech work without one) and clamp it down on the first fret.

I am now measuring the height of the strings above the 12th fret, I adjust the bridge so that the 3 treble strings are all 1.5mm (or a nominal imperial value, I work in metric) or higher, the lowest string must be 1.5mm, do the same with the 3 bass strings. Any strings that are above the 1.5mm mark I slacken the string off pull it off the bridge saddle, file the saddle down with a nut file. Only a few passes at a time, it's easy to take the string off again and file some more, it's not easy to fix if you file too far. When all the strings are at the same height and the radius matches the fretboard I take the capo off again.



A quick note about nut files. For the thicker strings you can use a drill bit of roughly the correct size wrapper in sand paper as a substitute, for the thinner strings it gets much harder finding something thin enough. I would suggest investing in the thinner nut files as I can't really say "this tool" will do the job if you can't get the nut files, there just isn't anything.

Any bridge saddles that have been filed need to be sanded down with 600 grit sand paper until smooth. Hard, rough and square edges break strings, take the time and make sure there are none, it'll save you continual string changes and save you money in single strings.

We now have to make sure the height of all the strings at the nut is correct. Which probably means more nut files. The way I measure the height at the nut is to capo at the third fret, so the string is touching on the second, and measure the gap between the first and the string. This picture should help.



You should be able to put a piece of paper under the string by the first fret. Roughly half the gap you put in on the neck relief. It should never be touching the fret. If it is then you'll have to remove tension in all the strings, take the nut off and put a thin piece of something (preferably wood) underneath it as a shim to raise it up. Any high strings we slacken off and file the slot down with a nut file, again only a few passes at a time, it's easy to take material out, not easy to put it back in again.

At the shop we always lubricate the nut. Some people draw in the slots with pencils for the graphite. In the shop we use Big Bends Nut Sauce. You may notice a lot of the Big bends stuff being used here, it's great stuff and that's why we use it on the bench. They sell a pack that includes everything you will need called the "Nut Sack" in a lovely little bag. The nut sauce is applied the tiniest bit in the nut slot and the string placed on top, just wipe away any excess.



The setup is almost finished, and this stage varies depending on the guitar and the player. Setting the height of the bridge which sets the action. For a tune-o-matic, we just need to measure the height of the bass and treble E strings provided we set the radius correctly. For a tremolo that doesn't have height adjustable saddles we do the same. Fender style bridges that have individual height adjustment on the saddles you just need to set each one.

The height depends on what action you want, but generally I measure for a 1.5mm gap between the string and the 12th fret (no capo this time). If you want a higher action then you can shoot for 2mm. If you have a well dressed shredder type guitar like an Ibby, a PRS (not shreddy I know) etc. you can probably go as low as 1mm. Although action is highly preferential on the one hand, unless a customer has specifically asked for high or low action, we set it at 1.5mm every time and have had nothing but the opposite of complaints about it from every none from metal head shredders to soft rock rhythm guitarists. It also seems to be the magic number to fix any setup issues with intonation, buzzing at the higher frets etc.



The penultimate stage of the setup is intonation. Check the note open, at the 12th harmonic and the 12th fret. If they're all the same, good! If not you need to adjust the saddle, if the note is flat at the 12th fret you need to move the saddle forwards (towards the neck). Flat fret forwards. If it's sharp move it backwards.

The final step is something even more objective than action. Pickup heights. If you are experimenting there is a good starting point and it is something we can actively measure. Because of how strings vibrate there is more movement over the neck pickup than the bridge (and therefore magnetic fluctuations creating more volume). This means for a good volume balance we need to have the neck pickup lower than bridge pickup.

Fret the bass E string on the last fret, and adjust the pickups so the pole pieces have a 2.5mm gap, repeat this on the treble E. If you are using single coils I would normally put a 3.5mm gap on the bass side instead. Because we are fretting the last fret the string creates a natural gradient to measure the height from. Adjust from there as needed.
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
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Last edited by GABarrie at Sep 28, 2013,
#9
Still reserving
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#10
Reservy wervy
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Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#11
Reserving!
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
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Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#12
Reserved
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#13
Still reserving posts
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#14
And yet more
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#15
Last one...
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#16
Quote by GABarrie
Last one...


I hope you're sure.
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#17
I only actually need 12, I left myself 3 spare
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
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#18
My guitar doesn't need a fretjob, but I'd love to try that woodblock thing. Sounds satisfying.
RG351DX - Bridge Dragonfire Screamer, Mid+Neck Fender Hot Noiseless
Peavey Valveking 112 - Eminence GB128
AMT E1 > Joyo AC Tone > Dan'o EQ > Shimverb > Digidelay
#19
I am monitoring this thread.
I fell asleep on my arm once, scariest thing that ever happened to me. I thought it was kill.
#21
please refrain from bringing popcorn, no food at the bench
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#22
your not done yet but I´m putting in a big thanks and a "YOU RULE"!!!!...really hate having to give my guitar to some luthier I don´t really trust when I can do it myself....and usually better than the options that are givin to me in this town.

...just don´t f*ck up the rest so I have to delete this post ;-)
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#23
can't wait for post #3
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#24
Nice work

title is slightly ambiguous, though- "perfectly playable" could mean "perfect" or "adequate"

e.g. "The setup on the guitar wasn't great but it was still perfectly playable"

I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#25
Quote by Dave_Mc
Nice work

title is slightly ambiguous, though- "perfectly playable" could mean "perfect" or "adequate"

e.g. "The setup on the guitar wasn't great but it was still perfectly playable"

Only if you're British
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#26
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#28
I can't wait to see how this goes. I can't thank you enough for doing this, Gordon! I used to build & finish guitar bodies from scratch, & just screw on a Charvel maple neck (that I lacquered with nitrocellulose). If I ever had worn, buzzy frets, I could never get the leveling perfect, & would just wind up buying a new neck
2 of my guitars are eagerly awaiting the continuation of this thread, so I don't have to take them in for fret jobs. My last attempt at fret repair was trying to removing a nasty buzz from my brand new Epi LP (I played 30 of those guitars at GC, & the one I chose was far superior in playabilty than any of the other ones for some reason, but it had this one buzz at the B string 20th fret when bending. I thought it would be a snap to fix it ). Wound up costing $180 to repair & set up correctly, but holy crap, it plays great now. This is why I so much appreciate what you're doing here!!
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#29
Quote by riffhog
I can't wait to see how this goes. I can't thank you enough for doing this, Gordon! I used to build & finish guitar bodies from scratch, & just screw on a Charvel maple neck (that I lacquered with nitrocellulose). If I ever had worn, buzzy frets, I could never get the leveling perfect, & would just wind up buying a new neck
2 of my guitars are eagerly awaiting the continuation of this thread, so I don't have to take them in for fret jobs. My last attempt at fret repair was trying to removing a nasty buzz from my brand new Epi LP (I played 30 of those guitars at GC, & the one I chose was far superior in playabilty than any of the other ones for some reason, but it had this one buzz at the B string 20th fret when bending. I thought it would be a snap to fix it ). Wound up costing $180 to repair & set up correctly, but holy crap, it plays great now. This is why I so much appreciate what you're doing here!!

Well, the actual leveling part is up now I have band practice in a bit so need to get stuff together but I'll try and get at least one more post up before I go.

If it needs any more information let me know, I've tried to describe it as well as I can.
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Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
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#31
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH


x2.

Gordon seems shady. What does he know anyway?

Looks great so far. It is time consuming. Can't wait to see the rest. Keep up the good work Gordon !
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Last edited by R45VT at Sep 26, 2013,
#32
Quote by R45VT
x2.

Gordon seems shady. What does he know anyway?

Looks great so far. It is time consuming. Can't wait to see the rest. Keep up the good work Gordon !
This entire process took me 5 hours of work (not including drinking cups of tea), and I am used to it, I recon if this had been the first one I had done I'd be looking at closer to 8 hours work.
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#33
This is hard work
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#34
Quote by GABarrie
We generally uses 3 cloths, one for applying, one for rubbing off and one for a final buff.


teeheeheeheeheehee
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#35
Quote by GABarrie
This entire process took me 5 hours of work (not including drinking cups of tea), and I am used to it, I recon if this had been the first one I had done I'd be looking at closer to 8 hours work.


Yeah- I halfway did one guitar and it took me an hour to level the frets and then 4-5 hours to polish them.

I still have to tweak the bridge, nut and neck but it plays halfway decent. Next time I change the strings I will start finishing the final tweaks.


Really good thread. Thanks for taking the time to so this!
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See, it's important that people clarify when they say "metal", because I pretty much always assume they are a Cannibal Corpse fanboi.
#36
thank you very much for your hard work!
WTLT 2014 GG&A

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nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


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youre just being a jerk man.



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#37
You're trying to get me to break my new guitar!

Shady indeed...

Lots of good content, thanks for putting it up. I almost want to get a beat-up pawn shop guitar to practice on. Maybe that will be a winter project.
#38
Quote by R45VT
Yeah- I halfway did one guitar and it took me an hour to level the frets and then 4-5 hours to polish them.

I still have to tweak the bridge, nut and neck but it plays halfway decent. Next time I change the strings I will start finishing the final tweaks.


Really good thread. Thanks for taking the time to so this!

The 4-5 hours polishing is down to not enough work with the file when crowning. It's the biggest mistake I made on my first fret dress. The more work and scarring you take out with the triangle file, the easier it is to polish.
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#39
Thanks so much for all this awesome information.

I have a question for you Barrie,

How can I (or would you recommend against...) remove the thick lacquer on my Fender Tele's neck/fretboard? It's super thick and it feels like I'm playing on glass. I played a '72 Tele the other day and it just felt amazing having some grain under my fingers.

Thanks in advance!
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My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
Last edited by N_J_B_B at Sep 27, 2013,
#40
Great job!

Just wondering if you have any experience with humidity relief changes. Seems when I play a gig outdoor on a rainy night my relief gets less and it buzzes and plays horrible, I have to loosen off the truss a tiny bit to get it back. Also if the Air conditioning is on it moves again. Is this a common problem or is it more likely on a thin neck like my Prestige?
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