#1
Hello guitar world,
I teach drum lessons at a local music school, and have been asked to take over teaching the beginner and intermediate guitar class. I would classify myself as an intermediate player, I have dabbled in guitar my whole life, but really started learning the ins and outs over the past couple years.

We teach mostly kids...for drums I start of with a warm-up, then theory, then we jam. I'm probably going to take the same approach for guitar, just wondering if I can get a few tips on a good lesson plan for kids just starting out. Thanks!!!
#2
Hi, start going through the basics and then giving them some exercicies and making sure that they don't play ANY note wrong. In other words, don't let them rush and try to play as fast they can, go up the metronome with them.
Get some book with exercices like 'Terrifying Guitar Technique' and for the how-to-play suttf get this book 'The Correct Principles of Playing Guitar' and if you're only teaching electric guitar, just skip the first chapters.

Hope this helps, good luck on the lessons I think it will go great!
#3
^ exercises, technique, correct principles, a metronome and making sure they don't play ANY notes wrong?

yeah, that's sure to win those kids' hearts and minds and show them the wonder of music.

They're kids. It needs to be fun and to keep their attention. Those are the main two things. Even for adults it doesn't hurt to keep those things in mind, but it's especially important for children.

Get them playing proper songs as quickly as possible.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Sep 26, 2013,
#4
When talking about kids there is only one thing that matters: having fun.If you dont do that you ll lose them in a flash.Make up group games that ll teach them very basic concepts and that ll all enjoy .
#5
Have them play what they like and go from there. Try to explain basic techniques and really make sure they love what they're doing. I've taught a multitude of students over the past few years and my current regular is actually autistic and it's really interesting to see what he's interested in. I just had him learn music that he wanted to learn for fun and for worship, but he's now more interested with becoming a pro level musician and we talk about theory and such more than technique. It's really a fulfilling process to watch a student grow.
#6
yeah, but what happens when the Kid loves to play guitar and then when he's trying to improve he can't because he didn't started with some solid techniques.
but do as you want.
#7
Technique is a work in process. Anyone can become better at anything at any given time. If he or she decides that they want to go to the next level, they can work towards it. You don't just get stuck in playing.

I like to teach proper technique along with learning songs they want to know. It's not what happens in the lesson that makes a student better, it's what happens outside, so motivating them to stick to their craft is the most important part of being a teacher. Make their money worth it.
#8
I like the approach of having fun, to keep them engaged, while mixing in some technique and theory to develop their brains....that's the approach I take with the percussion students and it seems to work.

I think I'm looking for some more specific ideas. Should I start with some basic chords or simple melody lines, should pentatonic be the first scale I teach them or should I start with Major/Minor, what are the best steps to take?
#9
I usually start with Major/Minor if they're a little shy with their own interests, but if they're interested in learning Van Halen and Hendrix, then I'll teach Pentatonics and work my way into the Major/Minor stuff.

Teach them enough to be able to play a few songs. That's the key. I taught my current top student the "Four Chords" for his first two weeks. He seemed to like the idea of playing a ton of different songs with the same basic chords.
#10
I'm not a teacher or even an acclompished guitar player, I'mjust a beginner. I would suggest keeping it simple by teaching them some easy to learn riffs for the first few weeks. You can get into the more technical stuff later.
#11
Quote by Dreamdancer11
When talking about kids there is only one thing that matters: having fun.If you dont do that you ll lose them in a flash.


Exactly.

Quote by Heimdallr1
yeah, but what happens when the Kid loves to play guitar and then when he's trying to improve he can't because he didn't started with some solid techniques.
but do as you want.


well, i dunno, i suppose you can cross that bridge when you come to it, but it's still a far easier bridge to cross than the kid who (justifiably) quit because it was boring. there isn't really any remedy for that one.

Quote by tonedefff
I like the approach of having fun, to keep them engaged, while mixing in some technique and theory to develop their brains....


yeah, the absolute best teachers (this goes for any subject) have you learning without your even realising it. If you can do that, then that's awesome.

Quote by JosephVincent

Teach them enough to be able to play a few songs. That's the key.


agreed. If "keep it fun/interesing" is the #1 rule, then "let them play actual songs/tunes as quickly as possible" is #2. In fact you could probably argue that they're 2 sides of the same coin, it's hard to keep it interesting if you're not playing proper songs.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?