#1
Im looking for a good mic to record with. Something that can record guitar, drums, vocals. Etc. Price range is as high as 400-500. Is there a go to mic or is having multiple different mic preferable. Like a couple sm57s vs a $400 mic.
#2
If your budget is only $400-$500, I'd buy a SM57 and a good condenser. You aren't going to get a good set of drum mics in your price range IMO. I'd look into an Audio Technica AT4040 for your condenser. Go used, you'll save a ton that way.
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#3
Quote by lockwolf
If your budget is only $400-$500, I'd buy a SM57 and a good condenser. You aren't going to get a good set of drum mics in your price range IMO. I'd look into an Audio Technica AT4040 for your condenser. Go used, you'll save a ton that way.


+1....57´s good on the beater side of the kick drum but your gunna need something better at the hole...otherwise it´s the best allround mic your gunna find. Might as well get a 58 for song, perfect for live gigs too!!
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#4
What kind of vocals? If it's primarily screaming, am SM58 is probably ideal. If you've got some singing where you'd rather hear the nice-ness of the human voice, though, you'll definitely want a condenser. The aforementioned AT4040 is good, but I've noticed that the lower-end AT2020 seems to do better in untreated rooms. How's your room treatment? That's something you absolutely must consider, especially if you're wanting to record drums, or use a condenser on vocals.
#5
I picked up an SM57 and an SM58 for pretty cheap. Combine that with a decent interface/mixing board and you're pretty much good to go except for maybe the drums.

I use those mics through an Allen&Heath ZED FX10. Not exactly top dollar stuff, but it works out pretty well.
#6
sE2200a mkII (not the C one).
One of them and one/two SM57s would be a nice setup if you already have a decent audio interface.
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#7
Grab two sm57/58 clones, and a nice large diaphragm condenser microphone and you should be pretty well set. You could do simple drums with that (mono overhead, spot mics on kick and snare) and it'd be okay. Alternatively you could try squeezing in some cheap small diaphragm condensers like the Behringer C2 and then you'd have stereo overheads.
#8
TS, I really think we need to know what your genre is, what kind of vocals you plan on recording, how treated your room is, etc., before we can give you much useful advice.
#9
Quote by mjones1992
I picked up an SM57 and an SM58 for pretty cheap. Combine that with a decent interface/mixing board and you're pretty much good to go except for maybe the drums.

I use those mics through an Allen&Heath ZED FX10. Not exactly top dollar stuff, but it works out pretty well.

Why did you buy the same mic twice?

Those little ZED desks are ace man, nice pick.
#10
Quote by kyle62
Why did you buy the same mic twice?

Those little ZED desks are ace man, nice pick.


They're good to run in tandem (especially when recording guitar), and they're not EXACTLY the same

Very close though.

And yeah, the ZED is boss :-D
#11
Quote by mjones1992
They're good to run in tandem (especially when recording guitar), and they're not EXACTLY the same

Very close though.

And yeah, the ZED is boss :-D


They are the same mic. Shure even says they're the same mic. The only difference is the wind screen on the SM58. Not trying to be an asshat, they are the same mic.
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#13
Quote by KevinGoet


And I'll leave this here:

Quote by Shure's Website
The SM57 and SM58 microphones are based on the same cartridge design. The main difference is in the grille design. The SM58 was designed for vocal application and it uses a ball grille that acts as an effective pop filter. The SM57 was designed as an instrument microphone where a smaller grille size is preferred. In this application, pop and wind are not usually a concern....

The different resonator/grille assembly design of the SM57 is also responsible for its slightly higher output above 5 kHz.


Same Mic, different grill. Take the grill off the SM58 and those frequency curves will look more identical.
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