#1
Good morning people. I stumbled upon this interesting guitar at a car boot sale for £5, so I decided it was worth picking up. Anybody know much about this old Ibanez model 240 classical guitar? Certainly pretty old, but sounded not bad with the 4 old strings that came on it! Maybe worth getting it restored to a decent level? Could certainly do with new tuners, and the getting the bottom and sides glued since they're separating slighty..

Any info appreciated. Thanks

#2
It partly depends on the actual age of the guitar, which sort of dictates the country of origin. Early Ibanez were made in Japan. (As are some high end pieces today). Later stuff can be from China, Indonesia, or wherever.

This site has historical info: http://www.jedistar.com/ But I think Google may be your new best friend.

The side and back separation is likely humidity issues. Humidify the guitar first, then consider the repairs. If the value isn't all you hope for, it might behoove you to find a mate with some furniture clamp, a bit of patience and experience, then make the project your own. The jug of "Titebond" would be your treat, of course.

(You get a small mirror, and survey the damage on the inside as well). If the B &S are separating, there could be loose soundboard braces as well.

A professional repair and refinish, would be an arm, leg, or possibly your first born
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 27, 2013,
#3
Thanks for replying

I've managed to find out that it was made in Japan, and part of a 1965 release...
#4
There is a distinct possibility that a guitar that old, even though it's made in japan, might have a nitro lacquer finish. Unless the finish is completely trashed, or the location of the area you need to repair is too far out in plain sight, I'd try to save the factory finish if possible.

My guess is, if an old Ibanez is going to accrue some value, a MIJ instrument would be the best candidate.

After that, it kind of depends on the guitar's potential value, your financial situation, and your end game intentions. As in it's value at market, minus the cost of repairs. You could try shopping the job around to local music stores. An estimate coming from me would be a wild guess, at best. Sorry I can't be of more help.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Sep 28, 2013,