#1
Hey guys and gals

So lately I've been having a problem with my practicing...and by that I mean I've been devoting ALL my practice to alternate picking....on schooldays from 2-4 and on weekends from 4-6. And it's all been alternate picking because that's the ONE feild of practice I CAN'T seem to get better at.

But lately I've been practicing at a really slow tempo and moving up the temp when I feel ready. I'm doing a 16th note triplet thing starting at 40bpm and working up to my Max which is like 82bpm. I've spanned that over my two hour time increments....but by the time I get to about 72-74bpm....it get sloppy.....but I can play at 82bpm?? Wtf? Is that wrist fatigue? I take 5 min breaks every half hour??

Do I use a different practice Regamin?? This seems to be sucking. I've been practicing alternate picking like this for over a year now....I just want something to FINALLY go right for me, I'm sick of seeing no progress.

Any suggestions? From you or professionals??
Last edited by McZaxon at Sep 29, 2013,
#2
My honest advice is to stop chasing the bpm, that's what helped me.

I am serious, i was in the same boat as you. I was terrible at alternate picking and always doing picking exercises trying to improve my speed. That was probably the thing that held me back the most.

What you should do it learn material you like and let the speed come when you are ready for it. I always practice stuff with the only goal of making it sound good and being comfortable doing it now, if i can play it relaxed and it sounds good, more often then not, i can play it faster aswell.

So that's my suggestion. Learn stuff you like and make sure to get everything else down (relaxation, accuracy, tone etc) and don't worry about the speed. Speed =/= good.
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#3
Its because it takes a lot of time to develop that coordination but it will happen.. You will be able to play it once you stop trying to chase the speed. It helps to learn songs that aren't too fast if you can't play them fast yet and develop solid timing. ACDCs guitar is simple but it sounds so good (if you like that) because their always playing in the pocket.

The worst thing is trying to push yourself too hard with fast stuff too soon and have it come out sounding sloppy. You'll end up impeding progress because you have yet to develop a solid base.
#4
Quote by sweetdude3000
Its because it takes a lot of time to develop that coordination but it will happen.. You will be able to play it once you stop trying to chase the speed. It helps to learn songs that aren't too fast if you can't play them fast yet and develop solid timing. ACDCs guitar is simple but it sounds so good (if you like that) because their always playing in the pocket.

The worst thing is trying to push yourself too hard with fast stuff too soon and have it come out sounding sloppy. You'll end up impeding progress because you have yet to develop a solid base.



+1
#5
Firstly I will say that I believe that kind of practice is only going to lead to frustration, and only being able to play non musical stuff on the guitar...which is probably not where you will want to end up.

Anyway..to the rhythmic part of your question..
The reason I believe you can play "ok" at slow tempo, and "ok" at the higher tempo, but not the inbetween is probably that you're not nailing that rhythm in any of those tempos.
In the slower tempos you're probably just hitting that first note roughly, and the others somewhere unevenly spread out before the next.
At the 72-74bpm range you're probably having a hard time keeping the correct number of notes (probably too many) within that "window" (between clicks)..and at faster tempos, it's fast enough that you can just go all out and you'll roughly land the notes where they should be.

If this is the case (we wont really know unless you post a video...btw...post a video if you want proper critique) - I'd advise you to count the rhythm, or tap it with your hands on a table or whatever, and make sure they are perfectly evenly spaced, and the first one always landing on the click. You could play drone notes on the guitar as well I suppose... as long as it is just rhythmic without any melody.
Once you got the rhythm down, you can continue with your exercise.
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#6
Put the practicing off to one side for a moment, forget about it....forget numbers.

How's your playing?

Can you play the music you're trying to play accurately, expressively and comfortably?

Because that's all that matters, your "achievements" in practice are largely irrelevant. Practice is a means to an end, not the end itself, you've lost your focus and kinda forgotten why you picked the guitar up in the first place.

Nobody cares about the numbers, and neither should you - just make sure that the work your putting in during your practice time is actually improving your playing, Because if it isn't you're not making the best use of your time.
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