#1
so I just started to play guitar again...and ive been trying to learn basic theory. I realize that a "c" chord consists of the notes C, E, and G(right?) but a C chord on the guitar is played with a C, E, G(open), C, and E(open). Why do these notes produce a C chord?

I apologize for the poor explanation. Im just very confused on understanding how notes played together produce a certain chord.


Thanks,

--Ben
#2
Those 3 notes combined will be a C major chord.
Any formation of them will be a C major chord actually... you can put them in any order you want, and double as many notes as you want.
Different voicings will just make the chord sound a bit different. Experiment!

You don't even need a C as the lowest note...it's still an inversion of a C.
This last bit can be very confusing though, so don't think about it too much right now, as different musical contexts can change this.


edit:

That is called a triad btw... which is a chord consisting of root-3rd-5th.
This just means what it sounds like...it's the first, 3rd and 5th note of the scale (C major in this case).


edit2: This is completely the wrong forum for this... this should be in Musician Talk..so reporting.
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Last edited by Shor at Oct 1, 2013,
#4
Yeah, as mentioned, those are the Root, 3rd and 5th notes of the C major scale, therefore when all played together they create a C major chord
#5
It feels like you already understand your own question haha you basically answered it!
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#6
You can repeat the notes in the chord as many times as you want (it gives a bigger sound) and they can be in whatever order. It will still be a C major chord. So when you play the chord on guitar, it has more notes in it to give it a fuller sound. You can just play three-note chords on guitar if you want (and sometimes that's what you want to do) but you'll notice that it has a different sound. It doesn't sound as full as the open C chord.

Just experiment with the note order and listen to the sound.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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#7
A major chord is built by a major triad: Root, 3rd and 5th

If we're talking about C major you have: C D E F G A B, the root, 3rd and 5th will be C, E and G

As long as you play these notes, doesn't matter how much you repeat them or in what order they are played, it's a C major chord
#8
Quote by deluxity
A major chord is built by a major triad: Root, 3rd and 5th

If we're talking about C major you have: C D E F G A B, the root, 3rd and 5th will be C, E and G

As long as you play these notes, doesn't matter how much you repeat them or in what order they are played, it's a C major chord

I wouldn't look at any scale when I build a chord. You just need to know the intervals and how to build a major chord. A major chord has the root, major third and perfect fifth. What is the major third from C? It's an E. What is the perfect fifth from C? It's a G. You don't need to look at any scale to build chords (and looking at a scale is kind of confusing if you are building chords like diminished or augmented or 7th/extended chords).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I wouldn't look at any scale when I build a chord. You just need to know the intervals and how to build a major chord. A major chord has the root, major third and perfect fifth. What is the major third from C? It's an E. What is the perfect fifth from C? It's a G. You don't need to look at any scale to build chords (and looking at a scale is kind of confusing if you are building chords like diminished or augmented or 7th/extended chords).


But without knowing the scale intervals, how could you know why it's called a major 3rd or a perfect 5th?
#10
^ Yeah, of course you need to know the intervals first and they are easy to understand using the major and minor scales. But as I said, it gets really complicated when you try building more complicated chords. If you know all the intervals and then know how to build chords, you don't need to look at the scale any more. For example C7#11. You would look at the C major scale but then the 11th note is natural, not sharp, and also the 7th is natural, not flat. If you know what intervals you need to build that chord (1-3-5-b7-9-#11), you don't need to look at any scale.

It works for basic major and minor chords (for major look at the major scale and for minor look at the minor scale). But other than that, it just makes things more complicated.

But whatever.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#11
A good book I would recommend is "the progressive guitarist" Practical Theory for Guitar. It also comes with a CD and short Jam traxx so your can practice improvisation on the modes and scales as you go. A real geometric way to learn and get the sounds under your fingers.