#1
Hi people, I'm into playing mainly acoustic guitar but recently I've been learning some electric and bass guitar stuff.

I'm a grade 8 tutor in acoustic and one of my friends loves playing electric and has asked me to help him learn some theory/scales etc.

Its going well but it got me thinking what different musical styles use different types of scales, chords, techniques etc.?

Like Jazz loves the dom 7th chords.

I'm no expert but it seems like metal playing loves the fast solo playing. Do they favour power chords also?

Any info is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
#2
What exactly is a grade 8 tutor in acoustic?

Genres are defined by much more than note choice.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Every genre uses the same 12 notes. And I would say all techniques are used in all music styles (a bit differently of course but they are still the same techniques).

Metal riffs use lots of power chords, same as rock, but they also use some more "exotic" chords. They also play fast solos but there are also slow and melodic solos. You can't generalize a genre that way.

Just listen to different genres and listen to what they do in the songs. Analyze some pieces. Metal is a wide genre and it has lots of subgenres that have very little in common (glam metal vs death metal for example). Just learn some jazz and metal and rock songs and you'll learn about the genres. Asking about what scales they use is useless. A scale isn't going to make you sound like metal. It's about how you use the notes, not what notes you use.

The sound of the genre comes from other things than just note choice. You can write a pop song and a metal song with the same note choice. It has a lot to do with what instruments you use and what kind of sounds you use. Rhythm is very important.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#4
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Every genre uses the same 12 notes. And I would say all techniques are used in all music styles (a bit differently of course but they are still the same techniques).

Metal riffs use lots of power chords, same as rock, but they also use some more "exotic" chords. They also play fast solos but there are also slow and melodic solos. You can't generalize a genre that way.

Just listen to different genres and listen to what they do in the songs. Analyze some pieces. Metal is a wide genre and it has lots of subgenres that have very little in common (glam metal vs death metal for example). Just learn some jazz and metal and rock songs and you'll learn about the genres. Asking about what scales they use is useless. A scale isn't going to make you sound like metal. It's about how you use the notes, not what notes you use.

The sound of the genre comes from other things than just note choice. You can write a pop song and a metal song with the same note choice. It has a lot to do with what instruments you use and what kind of sounds you use. Rhythm is very important.




This. My choice of scales and chords, and for the most part, techniques, isn't honestly very different whether I'm writing metal, acoustic, orchestral, electronic. This differences between genres just aren't really something that can be put into words.
#6
Cheers for the replies guys.

I understand where you are coming from. I know its not always what is being played, but how it is played. Plus the effects that can be used to alter the sound to give it a unique feel also.

My question is simply to broaden my knowledge of different styles.

So far i have mainly focused on acoustic, but i'm a huge fan of John Fruciante. So Funk and Jazz is definitely going to be covered by me soon.

Quote by MaggaraMarine

Metal riffs use lots of power chords, same as rock, but they also use some more "exotic" chords. They also play fast solos but there are also slow and melodic solos. You can't generalize a genre that way.


Could you elaborate on these exotic chords?

Many Thanks.
#7
Quote by Funky Monk Funk
Cheers for the replies guys.

I understand where you are coming from. I know its not always what is being played, but how it is played. Plus the effects that can be used to alter the sound to give it a unique feel also.

My question is simply to broaden my knowledge of different styles.

So far i have mainly focused on acoustic, but i'm a huge fan of John Fruciante. So Funk and Jazz is definitely going to be covered by me soon.


Could you elaborate on these exotic chords?

Many Thanks.

Funk especially is very rhythm based music. The rhythm of the song is really important. You need to feel the groove in funk!

And with "more exotic chords" I meant not the basic power/major/minor chords. Things like add chords and extended chords. I'm not really sure which bands use them but I saw a video of one metal guitarist (don't remember who it was) showing some "exotic" sounding chord voicings he used in some of his songs. I think they are used in more modern metal and in more progressive stuff.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Great stuff, cheers.

I've gotta mate who likes the chili's too, and from what he's told me that makes sense (about the funk).

Think he said the chords are not very complex most of the time but it involved a good sense of rhythm and a fair bit of muting. Maybe a wah pedal too (Which i now have ).

Thanks, i've never been into metal much but i've got 1 or 2 mates who love it, and i know there are quite a few people near me who like it so i may get asked for help?