#1
Hi,

Probably the most basic question ever, but I dont know theory, all by ear at the moment so trying to learn.

From what I have seen on YouTube chords are produced from a scale.

So for example the D chord fits into this scale:



Does that mean the D chord will fit with G and Bm chords because they are also in the scale?

Sorry if im completely wrong and the above sounds nuts.
#3
Yes. Of course those chords can "fit" and exist with a D chord, but that doesn't mean that other chords can't. It's also quite possible to have a song where an F might be used. Try not to get too hung up on chords in a particular scale. It's a good starting point for telling you which chords will work, but don't forget other possibilities.

Now, let's try your suggestion... Play a D chord, then follow it with the G and then the Bm. While it does work, doesn't it feel a tad bit unresolved? Play the V chord after that Bm, which is the A. Sound better?
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Oct 2, 2013,
#4
Don't forget, this scale is in the key of D. D is the I, G is the IV, Bm is the vi and A is the V.
#5
Just for the sake of knowledge, the scale you posted is F# Phrygian. Given that the modes are made of the major scale, that means that it is also B Minor (aeolian) AND D Major (Ionian). Since our Major scale formula is (starting on D, which is our 1 chord) M-m-m-M-M-m-m, we can assign designations to the chords within the scale. Doing this, we have D, Em, F#m, G, A, Bm, C#min, D.

I hope I said that right....this cold makes my brainwaves misfire.
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Last edited by Butthead at Oct 2, 2013,
#6
Quote by Butthead
Here's the fun part, since you're in F# Phyrgian, F# can be your tonic. All you have to do is take the above sequence and start on the F#, making it F#m, G, A, Bm, C#min, D, Em.

I hope I said that right....this cold makes my brainwaves misfire.

That's not how modes work...

OT:
Actually, TS, chords are made out of the notes of key signatures. So, say you're in the key of A major. The 7 notes of the key signature are A, B, C#, D, E, F#, & G#. Therefore, the chords available to us are: Amaj, Bmin, C#min, Dmaj, Emaj, F#min, & G#dim. To understand why we have these chords, you should 1) realize that all 7 of these chords utilize 3 notes of the notes contained in the key signature AND 2) study some chord construction.

A good resource for chord construction is this lesson. Notice how triads* are built.

*A triad is a chord consisting of 3 notes. All basic major, minor, diminished, augmented, and suspended chords contain ONLY 3 notes. As examples: Dmajor, Eminor, F#dim, Aaug, & Csus2 are all triads. However, 7th, 9th, 13th, 7#11, etc. chords are not triads, because they are chords containing more than 3 notes. As examples: D7, Em9, F13, A7#11 are NOT triads.

For further resources, see below:
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/42
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/45
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/48
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/47
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/43 -- This says "scales" a lot, when it's actually more correct to say "keys".
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/44

Edit:
Keys supersede scales, btw. You can play any scale over a particular key, and it would still be technically correct.
Whether certain scales would sound good or mesh well with the chords of the key, that's a whole different deal, lol.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Oct 2, 2013,
#7
I think I confused what I was trying to say. I made an edit.
I AM MASTER OF JIGGLYPUFF.

Current Gear:
Gibson Boneyard with Bigsby
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Mesa Stiletto Trident
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Mesa 2x12 & 4x12 Cabs
#8
Quote by Butthead
Just for the sake of knowledge, the scale you posted is F# Phrygian. Given that the modes are made of the major scale, that means that it is also B Minor (aeolian) AND D Major (Ionian). Since our Major scale formula is (starting on D, which is our 1 chord) M-m-m-M-M-m-m, we can assign designations to the chords within the scale. Doing this, we have D, Em, F#m, G, A, Bm, C#min, D.

I hope I said that right....this cold makes my brainwaves misfire.

The scale isn't necessarily F# phrygian (I mean, of course it could be but that has to do with the chords you play over). And it isn't B minor and D major. It's B minor OR D major, depending on the chords in the background. If the chord progression resolves to Bm, then it's B minor and if it resolves to D, then it's D major.

But I think this "I have this scale, which chords would fit it?" is kind of thinking backwards. It would be more reasonable to ask "I have these chords, which scale would fit them?" The chords in the background make your melody sound way different. You can use the same scale but it will sound different if the chords are different.

But yeah, to know if D, Bm and G fit together, just play the chords. If it sounds good, they do fit together. It's all about sound. And you are allowed to play whatever chords you want. For example try playing D-F-G (all majors). That doesn't fit any one scale but I think it still sounds great.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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