#1
ok, before you bash me for ANY reason let me just say this first. One, I do not know whether or not this is the right location for this so sorry if it is. Two, I know you aren't supposed to do it, but i did it anyways just to see what would happen since it's just extra junk i have laying around. Now, here is the thing, i was expecting to get NO sound what so ever, and if anything some barely audible noise. But to my astonishment I had the lil' 9-volt battery operated junky amp turned all the way up and amazingly it was LOUD. Not loud as in drop your balls loud but loud enough to where it shook the decor on the walls. What I want to know is, how is this even possible and is this bad for the speaker or amp.
Crank your rig on 12, let it feedback wide-open for a good two minutes, freak your neighbors out and ENJOY THE POWER OF THE GUITAR! 'Oh, what a feeling,' and it ain't no damned Toyota!" ----Dimebag Darrell
#2
That happens because the speaker you played through was a lot more sensitive than the stock speaker. Speaker makes a big difference in volume. Even 1 watt can be pretty loud if you crank it up. And I don't know why it would hurt your amp or speaker.
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#3
Quote by MaggaraMarine
That happens because the speaker you played through was a lot more sensitive than the stock speaker. Speaker makes a big difference in volume. Even 1 watt can be pretty loud if you crank it up. And I don't know why it would hurt your amp or speaker.


Thanks, makes sense. I was told it would either harm the poweramp or headphone section of the amp, mainly because headphones are rated at much higher ohms than the loudspeakers that are used for guitar cabs.
Crank your rig on 12, let it feedback wide-open for a good two minutes, freak your neighbors out and ENJOY THE POWER OF THE GUITAR! 'Oh, what a feeling,' and it ain't no damned Toyota!" ----Dimebag Darrell
#4
Quote by heretic-clown
What I want to know is, how is this even possible and is this bad for the speaker or amp.


the headphone out is still a tiny little amplifier, it's made to drive the speakers in headphones so it is not unreasonable for it to drive the speaker in a guitar cabinet.

is it bad? could be. i tried to find specs on the output impedance of the headphone jack but i can't find anything. if the output impedance of the headphone jack is higher than the load you provide (the impedance of the speaker in the cabinet) then you can burn out the amp cuz it'll be working so hard*.

headphone impedance seems to range greatly with some being 16 (low impedance) all the way up to 600 ohms (high impedance). so using that knowledge, if you run a 16 ohm cabinet with the headphone out feature on the amp you should be fine.

* - i have read you should use headphones with 8 times the impedance of the output device for less distortion.
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Last edited by gumbilicious at Oct 4, 2013,