#2
I think you may be the guinea pig on this one.

However about 40 years ago I tried the metal finger picks, and they felt really clumsy. With that said, that could be more of a testimonial to my ineptitude at playing the guitar in general.

I think Roger McGuinn uses finger picks. He has a DVD tutorial out on 12 string technique.

The finger picks I've seen are all metal, with an adjustable band. The "Alaska Piks" however, seem to be more on the order of a "Chinese Handcuff" retention strategy.

If fake nails are off the table, the only thing left I suppose, is to have a go at the picks you linked.
(I didn't check the price, though)......

EDIT: I checked the price. Not only that, did you know that all the major online retailers stock them? http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/alaska-pik-finger-guitar-pick
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 7, 2013,
#3
Alaska pics? Don't waste your money, I bought some a couple of months ago,flimsy, akward to get on, once on, they wouldn't stay on, I gave up on them.
#4
There is a video on youtube about how to fit them to your fingers. Did you try fitting them or did you use them right out of the bag?
#5
Quote by Captaincranky
I think you may be the guinea pig on this one.

However about 40 years ago I tried the metal finger picks, and they felt really clumsy. With that said, that could be more of a testimonial to my ineptitude at playing the guitar in general.

I think Roger McGuinn uses finger picks. He has a DVD tutorial out on 12 string technique.

The finger picks I've seen are all metal, with an adjustable band. The "Alaska Piks" however, see (Cree claims you don't need a special dimmer for their current line).m to be more on the order of a "Chinese Handcuff", retention strategy.

If fake nails are off the table, the only thing left I suppose, is to have a go at the picks you linked.
(I didn't check the price, though)......

EDIT: I checked the price. Not only that, did you know that all the major online retailers stock them? http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/alaska-pik-finger-guitar-pick


I did see the major retailers carried them, but there isn't much difference in price and I've always preferred to support small business myself. Musicians Friend has got a whole lot of my money over the years and I don't think they appreciate it as much as a small business would LOL

HUGE EDIT the first site I posted actually beats musicians friends price by a penny on 4 picks and after shipping they beat them by a couple bucks! even more on an 8 pack order. Cheering on the mom and pop guys!
Last edited by tearsbled at Oct 4, 2013,
#6
UPDATE: music123 had the second lowest price after shipping for a 4 pack it was
Subtotal $7.96
Standard Ground (4 - 6 Business Days) $3.49
Tax (estimated)$0.80
Order Total $12.25

alaskapicks.com had the lowest price after shipping it was


$7.95


Subtotal: $7.95
Shipping: $3.50
Total: $11.45

Having ran a small business having to compete with the big guys for years something about me gets excited when I see the little ones win one. There price difference got larger at alaskapicks.com as the order got larger too. They discount the price with volume. The 8 pack was like another 2 dollars cheaper itself, didn't look at any of the larger volume ones as I haven't even tried them yet. I'm thinking about getting the starter pack so I can try the brass ones and the polymer both.
#7
Check out Estas Tonne on YouTube. He looks like he has those female fake nails. It's an interesting way to go.
#8
I'm afraid my testosterone is a little too high and I care a little too much what the ladies think lol. Though a neat idea I can't see myself actually doing it.
#9
Quote by tearsbled
There is a video on youtube about how to fit them to your fingers. Did you try fitting them or did you use them right out of the bag?


Reason I got them,was after watching the YouTube video, I followed the instructions to the letter,after I got them,I think their overpriced for what they are,apart from being frigging useless,I use my nails predominately anyway,so maybe that's the reason,different strokes for different folks.
#10
Quote by tearsbled
I did see the major retailers carried them, but there isn't much difference in price and I've always preferred to support small business myself. Musicians Friend has got a whole lot of my money over the years and I don't think they appreciate it as much as a small business would LOL

HUGE EDIT the first site I posted actually beats musicians friends price by a penny on 4 picks and after shipping they beat them by a couple bucks! even more on an 8 pack order. Cheering on the mom and pop guys!
Well then, why not let just the eagle fly instead of wasting time expecting the rest to have done the testing for you? It's not like these are a thousand dollar guitar
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 4, 2013,
#11
I have a similar question, I've been playing finger style for about 2 years and travis picking for about a year now. I've always played the same basic patterns thought, until recently. I've been watching chet atkins, merle travis, doc watson and that kind of rockabilly style and want to learn to play more like that, more melody rather than chord shapes with the left hand, and a lot more complex.

At the moment I'm pretty competent at playing with no pick (thumb pick) or nail, just bare thumb and fingers, but I've noticed that almost all of these old players use a thumb pick and mute the bass notes to get a more boom-chick kinda sound. I've been trying to mute the bass strings with the ball of my palm and play the bass with my thumb but I've found that the angle my thumb ends up at makes it difficult for me to consistently hit the strings and have full movement of the three fingers. I sort of don't want to go down the pick route because I like the fact that wherever I am, when I see a guitar I can play everything I know as best I can, I always thought it looked like a pain in the ass when someone has to ask for a pick and can't play a shred of what they can play without one. I could be tempted though to take up a pick if it's significantly better than bare fingers and if I can't eventually play the bass strings well with a bare and nail-less thumb.

So my question is: would I ever be able to achieve the same effect as merle travis or doc watson (or near enough) with just a thumb. Is it just a question of getting used to the new hand position with the muted bass notes?

Also does anyone know any examples of serious travis/ chet style rockabilly pickers who don't use a thumb pick??

Advice is much appreciated


Cheers,
Edd
#12
Quote by EddYerb
....[ ]....At the moment I'm pretty competent at playing with no pick (thumb pick) or nail, just bare thumb and fingers, but I've noticed that almost all of these old players use a thumb pick and mute the bass notes to get a more boom-chick kinda sound. I've been trying to mute the bass strings with the ball of my palm and play the bass with my thumb but I've found that the angle my thumb ends up at makes it difficult for me to consistently hit the strings and have full movement of the three fingers. I sort of don't want to go down the pick route because I like the fact that wherever I am, when I see a guitar I can play everything I know as best I can, I always thought it looked like a pain in the ass when someone has to ask for a pick and can't play a shred of what they can play without one. I could be tempted though to take up a pick if it's significantly better than bare fingers and if I can't eventually play the bass strings well with a bare and nail-less thumb. ....[ ]....
OK, I'm a flat picker. There, I said it, and allegedly "admission absolves guilt". I'm also invested more in rhythm based playing than melody. (except that which I can work incidentally into the rhythm parts).

With that out of the way

IMO, a thumb pick is a awful contraption. It pretty much takes an upstroke out of the equation, and finger picks kill the down stroke. (I tried them briefly, and discarded the idea).

So, for heavily arpeggiated pieces, I use "hybrid picking". The index finger still has to retain the pick in conjunction with the thumb, so the middle and ring fingers make up the balance of a 3 finger style. Using the thumb, index, and middle only, is fairly common in folk and country styles anyway, but certainly frowned upon in a classical setting.

A Brit folk rocker, Richard Thompson, is acknowledged as a master of hybrid picking. You should check out some of his video material, and see if this is something you might embrace.

For songs like, The Who, "Behind Blues Eyes", and the now infamous Led Zeppelin tirade, "Stairway to Heaven", I would be hybrid picking the arpeggios in the verses, then return to sheer brute force tactics, in the power chorded choruses. You can also play some Dire Straits in this fashion. Mark Knopfler uses a 3 finger style quite often, and hybrid picking will enable that also.


Oh, and sorry I only answered only a small part of your many questions.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 5, 2013,
#13
Quote by tearsbled
I'm afraid my testosterone is a little too high and I care a little too much what the ladies think lol. Though a neat idea I can't see myself actually doing it.


I would use it as a crutch to bring up the fact I am a musician. I'm going to try this one day, but currently I've been playing my electric more than my acoustic.
#14
Quote by JunkieDreams
I would use it as a crutch to bring up the fact I am a musician. I'm going to try this one day, but currently I've been playing my electric more than my acoustic.
I think in this context, I would have used, "prop", in lieu of the term, "crutch".... After all. with all that testosterone at one's disposal, a person should hardly need, "a crutch"....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 7, 2013,
#15
If you want to use some finger picks or grow your fingernails to some ungodly length, that's your call. But you should be "able" to play fingerstyle with just your bare hand, and normal nails.

There's nothing more pathetic than a guitar player that can't play if they don't have a pick.
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#16
I use my fingers and have forever. I never learned to use a pick. I drop the little buggers all the time. Finger picks were a pain and never worked for me because you can only pluck with them.
Try my method fingers without a pick, it's cheaper for sure.
#17
Gel nails work really, really well, but you need to go for a touch-up every few weeks. It is virtually unnoticeable that you have 'fake' nails. The downside is that your own nails will have to be given a bit of a rest now and then or they tend to be a bit soft and thin. The other downside is that the gel nails, while not readily noticeable, will fluoresce slightly under ultraviolet light, so peeler bar visits will make them stand out.
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