#1
Hey, I'm new. I searched for a common thread but couldn't find much.

So here's the rig I have now. I have a fender jaguar (humbuckers) going to a pedal board with a chorus pedal. At the chorus pedal, the signal splits. One signal goes to the guitar amp (fender reverb deluxe) and the other line I want as a bass send, going to a bass preamp and so forth.

Here's the rig I'm thinking. Same pedals, but one split would go to a bass pre-amp, then power amp, then bass cabinet. The other split would go to (maybe a pre-amp, then) the power amp and to the guitar cabinet.

I've looked up a few stereo power amps, they all seem to be usable, but they're all meant for PA systems.

What do you guys know about standalone power amps? Should I look for tubes? Should I be worried about impedance?
#2
Quote by RedheadFever
...and the other line I want as a bass send, going to a bass preamp and so forth.

Here's the rig I'm thinking. Same pedals, but one split would go to a bass pre-amp, then power amp, then bass cabinet. The other split would go to (maybe a pre-amp, then) the power amp and to the guitar cabinet.


i guess the idea is to 'simulate' a bass player by plugging your guitar into a bass rig? it will just sound like a clean guitar. the bass gets it's low end from the longer string length and thick strings, it allows it to go an octave lower than guitar.

i am not trying to dissuade you so much as to not get your hopes up. more successful setups that try these tend to use some harmonizer or pitch bending device to make the guitar sound an octave lower, but it does little to isolate the low notes and sounds pretty muddy whenever you play any chords.

you can get something like a pickup that will isolate each string and send it to a midi device and it may be able to isolate the lower/lowest note and bend the pitch down one octave, but i still see this as a less than optimal solution.

but to address your question, you will need a preamp before running the signal into a power amp.

Quote by RedheadFever
I've looked up a few stereo power amps, they all seem to be usable, but they're all meant for PA systems.


that is generally the application for power amps: to power stereo PA's. but those power amps will work pretty much just as well for guitar or bass applications if you have an acceptable preamp.

Quote by RedheadFever
What do you guys know about standalone power amps? Should I look for tubes? Should I be worried about impedance?


standalone power amps are made to amplify line level signals, usually provided by a mixer or preamp, or possibly a device like an mp3 player/smartphone.

i think a tube power amp would be a waste of money really. it will usually be much more expensive and heavier than a solid state preamp and you'll only really notice a difference if you plan on pushing the power amp so hard that it distorts. that being said i have seen a carvin tube power amp that is pretty affordable and i think it can even run 100 watts bridged in a 1U (maybe 2U) rack enclosure.

impedance? i guess. follow all the rules:

if it is a tube power amp then you need to be able to match the output impedance of the power amp to the impedance of the cabinet. if you will be using an 8 ohm cab then you'll want to use the 8 ohm output on the power amp.

if it is a solid state preamp then you will want to meet or exceed the min impedance rating of the power amp. most power amps have a min impedance of 4 ohms (some can go as low as 2 ohms and some have a min impedance of 8). you'll not want to hook up a cab (or series of cabs) that will drop the impedance below the min impedance.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#3
Thanks for the reply, this was very helpful and detailed.

Quote by gumbilicious
if you plan on pushing the power amp so hard that it distorts


This may happen. I'm still building the sound. I probably won't. If I get a higher wattage, does that mean it takes more volume to distort it? If I pushed one channel, would it affect the other?


Quote by gumbilicious
i am not trying to dissuade you so much as to not get your hopes up. more successful setups that try these tend to use some harmonizer or pitch bending device to make the guitar sound an octave lower, but it does little to isolate the low notes and sounds pretty muddy whenever you play any chords.


I appreciate the advice and understand the general truth, but it works well with my style. I have done it before with other rigs and it has sounded awesome after the right tinkering. I've thought about octave fuzzes, octave pedals... they don't fit right. The best way, I've found, is to have a bass send and then minimize ALL of the highs as much as possible. it destroys the overall tone (on the bass send), but I have plenty of that from the main send and together, it clicks. With a good preamp, you can narrow in pretty nicely and get a really smooth low end. If you pull it off right it impresses ladees
Last edited by RedheadFever at Oct 4, 2013,
#4
Quote by RedheadFever
This may happen. I'm still building the sound. I probably won't. If I get a higher wattage, does that mean it takes more volume to distort it? If I pushed one channel, would it affect the other?


generally a higher wattage means it'd break up at higher volumes.

pushing one channel should not effect the other channel, they should be completely independent.

Quote by RedheadFever
I appreciate the advice and understand the general truth, but it works well with my style. I have done it before with other rigs and it has sounded awesome after the right tinkering. I've thought about octave fuzzes, octave pedals... they don't fit right. The best way, I've found, is to have a bass send and then minimize ALL of the highs as much as possible. it destroys the overall tone (on the bass send), but I have plenty of that from the main send and together, it clicks. With a good preamp, you can narrow in pretty nicely and get a really smooth low end. If you pull it off right it impresses ladees


just so long as you know what you are getting into. i thought i'd do some naysaying just to be sure.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#5
Power amps meant for PAs are clean and are meant to amplify everything perfectly. The power amp found in guitar amps don't really do that at all. A power amp made for guitar is simply the power amp that would be found in an amp in the case of tube power amps or they're meant to recreate the response of a power amp found in an amp in the case of solid-state power amps. Going through a PA power amps won't sound as good unless the preamp you're using also simulates the power amp. Some do and some don't. Tubes depend on application. And that depends on the preamps. Some preamps benefit more from a tube power amp than others.

Here are some power amps that are made for guitar:
EHX 22 Calibur or 44 Magnum (SS)
ISP Stealth Power Amp (SS)
Rocktron Velocity 100 or 300 (SS)
Carvin TS100 (Tube)
Fryette Two/Ninety/Two Stereo or Two/Fifty/Two (Tube)
Mesa 2:NINETY or 2:FIFTY (Tube)
ENGL E840 or E850 (Tube)
Marshall EL34 50/50 100/100 (Tube)