#1
Hi all. You guys have all be great in helping me out with everything else so I wanted to ask a few questions that I have about the recording process. I'm mainly just trying to record a few original licks, and riffs to begin working on a song.

(i'm using reaper at the moment, with a Scarlett 2i2)

first question. In what order do artist usually record their tracks? do they record drums first so the guitars can keep up with the time easier this way? The problem I am having is keeping a tempo because I am playing without any drums, I have a hard time using the metronome and hearing it to keep up with it. Any suggestions on what could help with this?

Second question. What's the best way to add some drum in to the mix? Is there software out there that has like a full song worth of beats that I can play to so i don't have to go out and buy an MIDI controller? Or is the controller something i should really have anyway? Just not sure.

I really don't have any clue what i'm doing, just trying to learn it on my own.

Any help greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
Last edited by tsg31t at Oct 4, 2013,
#2
Yes, I'd definitely lay down a drum track first, especially if you're not used to playing to a metronome. It will help you keep time better, as you can hear the beat, rather than a click, and your performance will come out with more groove than it will if you're playing directly to a metronome.
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#3
Quote by MatrixClaw
Yes, I'd definitely lay down a drum track first, especially if you're not used to playing to a metronome. It will help you keep time better, as you can hear the beat, rather than a click, and your performance will come out with more groove than it will if you're playing directly to a metronome.


Sweet man, thanks.

Any recommendations on how to build a drum track? Software? technique? anything?
Don't really know a thing about it.

Thanks again.
#4
It really depends.

In some situations it's best to record the most prominent instrument in that section first.

Why? Because everything recorded after that will (instinctively) follow the timing/dynamic/groove of what's already recorded.

Unless every guy who is recording has perfect sense of each instrument and the track itself.


If you however record in entire tracks then drums 90% of the time is good to start with.

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#5
Easiest way to get started is to download TuxGuitar and load up some Guitar Pro files into it, export the MIDI drums and import into your DAW and edit to taste, assuming your drum program doesn't already have some kind of MIDI loops that came with it.

I program everything in the MIDI editor of my DAW from scratch, and while I have a controller, I find it easier to just do it manually on the screen.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#6
Quote by tsg31t
Hi all. You guys have all be great in helping me out with everything else so I wanted to ask a few questions that I have about the recording process. I'm mainly just trying to record a few original licks, and riffs to begin working on a song.

(i'm using reaper at the moment, with a Scarlett 2i2)

first question. In what order do artist usually record their tracks? do they record drums first so the guitars can keep up with the time easier this way? The problem I am having is keeping a tempo because I am playing without any drums, I have a hard time using the metronome and hearing it to keep up with it. Any suggestions on what could help with this?

Second question. What's the best way to add some drum in to the mix? Is there software out there that has like a full song worth of beats that I can play to so i don't have to go out and buy an MIDI controller? Or is the controller something i should really have anyway? Just not sure.

I really don't have any clue what i'm doing, just trying to learn it on my own.

Any help greatly appreciated.
Thanks.


Doesn't matter what order you record in. Depends on your preference.

The best way to add drums is to use a midi controller. You can pick them up reasonably on Craigslist. Make sure your recording software has "virtual instruments". Until you get the midi controller you will never be happy with the results without a huge amount of work.

Additional tips:

Do not record your guitar direct to the computer. Use a microphone.

Get a cheap chinese mic and have it modified. Pick a used one up cheap on craigslist and have it modified by Michael Joly or one of the other people who do that sort of thing. Results will be amazing. You can do this relatively cheaply and won't be able to match the sound for under a grand.

Get a good quality mic cord. And guitar cord for that matter. Yes it will affect the quality.
#7
Quote by Guitar Hack
Doesn't matter what order you record in. Depends on your preference.

The best way to add drums is to use a midi controller. You can pick them up reasonably on Craigslist. Make sure your recording software has "virtual instruments". Until you get the midi controller you will never be happy with the results without a huge amount of work.

Additional tips:

Do not record your guitar direct to the computer. Use a microphone.

Get a cheap chinese mic and have it modified. Pick a used one up cheap on craigslist and have it modified by Michael Joly or one of the other people who do that sort of thing. Results will be amazing. You can do this relatively cheaply and won't be able to match the sound for under a grand.

Get a good quality mic cord. And guitar cord for that matter. Yes it will affect the quality.

You know most professionals (especially the big names - Sneap, Bogren, etc) record direct then reamp, right? It makes it easier to edit.
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#8
Quote by Guitar Hack
Doesn't matter what order you record in. Depends on your preference.


So are you suggesting that, if your preference is to record the guitars in free time and then add the drums later, that this should be the recommended procedure?

Have you ever tried to add drums "after the fact" to something that was not recorded with a click?



Quote by Guitar Hack

The best way to add drums is to use a midi controller. You can pick them up reasonably on Craigslist. Make sure your recording software has "virtual instruments". Until you get the midi controller you will never be happy with the results without a huge amount of work.


Unless of course, your keyboard skills are less than excellent. Or, if you are using a drum pad controller, unless your drumming skills are less than excellent.

In which case, I'd see if your software has some kind of "groove control" or "humanize" feature, and just point and click the drums on a drum map.

Quote by Guitar Hack

Additional tips:

Do not record your guitar direct to the computer. Use a microphone.


Usually, if you have good mic technique and good mics. However, I have heard amp modeled guitars that sound better than a lot of miked guitars.

Quote by Guitar Hack

Get a cheap chinese mic and have it modified. Pick a used one up cheap on craigslist and have it modified by Michael Joly or one of the other people who do that sort of thing. Results will be amazing. You can do this relatively cheaply and won't be able to match the sound for under a grand.


And at the end of the day, you have a modified Chinese mic.

By the time you purchase, say, a Rode NT1 ($250) and the mod ($399) (http://recordinghacks.com/2011/09/21/oktavamod-rode-nt1a-review/ ), you've spent over $600. I got a used Rode K2 for measurably less than that. (originally a $1000 mic).

Quote by Guitar Hack

Get a good quality mic cord. And guitar cord for that matter. Yes it will affect the quality.


I'm going to bet that nobody who posts in this forum could honestly identify "the quality of my cables" as the weakest link in their recording chain.

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