#1
Pretty simple: have a Gibson Les Paul studio, love modding guitars to make weird sounds. Play metal, Rage Against the Machine is my biggest influence. I've added a third, high output p90 and I'm looking to add another few weird mods to it.

I've looked into kill switches and a built in fuzz circuit. Any other ideas welcome !!
#2
I've got two LPs that have been modified. Both started with Floyds. I dumped the 2V 2T quad, moved the master volume forward (to between the bridge and the bridge pickup). Behind it is a master treble rolloff (what we call a "tone" pot). In the third position is a Chandler Tone-X (this is an active sweepable mids boost (about 16 dB) -- something like a parked wah -- on a push-pull. The fourth knob is a Sustainer Intensity knob and the fifth position is a buckethead-style kill switch. The guitar has a Fernandes Sustainer built in, with the two mini-switches that operate it located behind the Floyd. Besides the sustain capabilities (it'll hold a note roughly till the battery runs out), it can also produce that harmonic overtone/stand in front of a loud amp sound by gradually decaying the note either to an octave overtone or simply adding the octave overtone in. But it can do all that with or without an amp (directly into a modeler and into a recording computer, if you wish). The sustainer driver is usually a humbucker-size dealio that fits into the neck pickup spot and can actually be used as a neck pickup when the sustainer's not in use. In this case, however, I have a single-coil size sustainer driver sharing space with a DiMarzio Fast Track II, an 18Kohm stacked humbucker normally used as a strat bridge pickup. In this case it makes a very focused, very high output neck pickup, and it's outstanding in that position.

On another guitar I have a passive mids cut in addition to the usual treble cut. The frequency cut is fixed, the amount is variable. On yet another guitar I have a passive *sweepable* mids cut on a push-pull. On this one the amount is fixed, the frequency cut is variable.

On another guitar I have an active preamp (it'll work with P90's, too). The 2T and 2V quad has been trashed (again) and has now become a master volume, a treble cut/boost, a bass cut/boost and a blend knob (blends two pickups). In the middle/5 position on the knobs, you get about what you would if you'd simply dimed the tone knobs on a conventional LP. On either side of the 5, you get up to a 15 dB boost or cut of that particular frequency on each of the treble and the bass sides of things. FAR more interesting and usable tone controls than the simple treble rolloffs that come on a traditional LP. You might also look at a phase switch, separate treble boosts.


And if you're using P90's in a gain situation, you might want to consider the noise you'll get from them. Take a look at Kinman noiseless P90's.

Forget the built-in fuzz circuit. Trust me. <G>
#3
Quote by dspellman
I've got two LPs that have been modified. Both started with Floyds. I dumped the 2V 2T quad, moved the master volume forward (to between the bridge and the bridge pickup). Behind it is a master treble rolloff (what we call a "tone" pot). In the third position is a Chandler Tone-X (this is an active sweepable mids boost (about 16 dB) -- something like a parked wah -- on a push-pull. The fourth knob is a Sustainer Intensity knob and the fifth position is a buckethead-style kill switch. The guitar has a Fernandes Sustainer built in, with the two mini-switches that operate it located behind the Floyd. Besides the sustain capabilities (it'll hold a note roughly till the battery runs out), it can also produce that harmonic overtone/stand in front of a loud amp sound by gradually decaying the note either to an octave overtone or simply adding the octave overtone in. But it can do all that with or without an amp (directly into a modeler and into a recording computer, if you wish). The sustainer driver is usually a humbucker-size dealio that fits into the neck pickup spot and can actually be used as a neck pickup when the sustainer's not in use. In this case, however, I have a single-coil size sustainer driver sharing space with a DiMarzio Fast Track II, an 18Kohm stacked humbucker normally used as a strat bridge pickup. In this case it makes a very focused, very high output neck pickup, and it's outstanding in that position.

On another guitar I have a passive mids cut in addition to the usual treble cut. The frequency cut is fixed, the amount is variable. On yet another guitar I have a passive *sweepable* mids cut on a push-pull. On this one the amount is fixed, the frequency cut is variable.

On another guitar I have an active preamp (it'll work with P90's, too). The 2T and 2V quad has been trashed (again) and has now become a master volume, a treble cut/boost, a bass cut/boost and a blend knob (blends two pickups). In the middle/5 position on the knobs, you get about what you would if you'd simply dimed the tone knobs on a conventional LP. On either side of the 5, you get up to a 15 dB boost or cut of that particular frequency on each of the treble and the bass sides of things. FAR more interesting and usable tone controls than the simple treble rolloffs that come on a traditional LP. You might also look at a phase switch, separate treble boosts.


And if you're using P90's in a gain situation, you might want to consider the noise you'll get from them. Take a look at Kinman noiseless P90's.

Forget the built-in fuzz circuit. Trust me. <G>


Crazy dude, where are you getting all this stuff?

Is the active preamp just like having an active pickup? Pardon my ignorance :L