#1
Is it important for me to try different sweep picking patterns while learning it?
Honestly... I can safely say, I can sweep... it clicked once I finally heard the fluent raking motion up and down, I can't pop it off in the midst of a solo because I'm not that good at it, and I can't do it that fast... I'm still working on keeping it extra clean, but I can sweep. (I'll put up a video in a month or so)

Anywho, I've been using like 4 different patterns total since like... January lol. But it's such a hard technique to master that I haven't really gotten bored with them, just wondering if incorporating new ones will help me get better at it, like playing new songs does.

If it's crucial, then please share with me some patterns/arpeggios to sweep around with. Thanks.
#2
I'd say that your four essential patterns are as follows;


-------------13-17-13------------
----------15-----------15---------
-------14-----------------14------
----15-----------------------15---
-17-----------------------------17
-----------------------------------

-------------14-17-14-------------------
----------15-----------15--------------
-------14------------------14----------
----16-------------------------16------
-17--------------------------------17--
----------------------------------------

-----------------14-17-14--------------------
--------------15-----------15------------
-----------16------------------16---------
--------16-------------------------16-------
-14-17--------------------------------17-14
----------------------------------------------

-------------------12-15-12-------------------------
----------------12----------12-----------------------
-------------12----------------12---------------------
----------14----------------------14-------------------
-------14----------------------------14----------------
-12-15----------------------------------15-12---------


Those are the ones you'll find the most in songs, I'd say that patterns other than those aren't essential when you first learn, but, other patterns are essential if you want to keep learning, for instance, you might look into patterns that force you to roll more on your second or third finger, for example, or add taps to some patterns when you want to incorporate that. In future, you'll also want to combine sweeps, slide between them and all that, so you can make progressions and melodies, I'd recommend looking at Luca Turilli to see how you can make an entire solo out of sweeps if you want, as he's brilliant at it.
#3
Sweeping is primarily used to play arpeggios. Learn to construct arpeggios and you'll never run out of different patterns.
#4
Quote by Geldin
Sweeping is primarily used to play arpeggios. Learn to construct arpeggios and you'll never run out of different patterns.

Bah..thanks a lot for stealing what I was about to say!
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#5
Hmm I guess I'll just google them... I'd sit there and learn to construct an arpeggio but I'll be sleeping soon. I was really just looking for a link to some tips on sweeping or more patterns.

Anyways as usual tips here go back to weak ass theory... reminds me how useless I am at knowing any theory. I'll force-learn, thanks.
#6
Quote by CelestialGuitar
I'd say that your four essential patterns are as follows;


-------------13-17-13------------
----------15-----------15---------
-------14-----------------14------
----15-----------------------15---
-17-----------------------------17
-----------------------------------

-------------14-17-14-------------------
----------15-----------15--------------
-------14------------------14----------
----16-------------------------16------
-17--------------------------------17--
----------------------------------------

-----------------14-17-14--------------------
--------------15-----------15------------
-----------16------------------16---------
--------16-------------------------16-------
-14-17--------------------------------17-14
----------------------------------------------

-------------------12-15-12-------------------------
----------------12----------12-----------------------
-------------12----------------12---------------------
----------14----------------------14-------------------
-------14----------------------------14----------------
-12-15----------------------------------15-12---------


Those are the ones you'll find the most in songs, I'd say that patterns other than those aren't essential when you first learn, but, other patterns are essential if you want to keep learning, for instance, you might look into patterns that force you to roll more on your second or third finger, for example, or add taps to some patterns when you want to incorporate that. In future, you'll also want to combine sweeps, slide between them and all that, so you can make progressions and melodies, I'd recommend looking at Luca Turilli to see how you can make an entire solo out of sweeps if you want, as he's brilliant at it.


Thanks Celest, will do mate. I appreciate the love.
#7
Quote by CelestialGuitar
I'd recommend looking at Luca Turilli to see how you can make an entire solo out of sweeps if you want, as he's brilliant at it.


He is also a good example of what not to do when it comes to execution. So much dirt noise.
#8
Some great patterns there!

Here are 3 that I use regularly Minor,Major and Dimished all at the same root position so you can modulate the progression easily.

-------------5-10-5-------------------------------------
-----------6--------6-----------------------------------
---------7------------7---------------------------------
-------7----------------7-------------------------------
---5-8--------------------8-5---------------------------
-6------------------------------------------------------


-------------5-10-5-------------------------------------
-----------7--------7-----------------------------------
---------7------------7---------------------------------
-------7----------------7-------------------------------
---5-9--------------------9-5---------------------------
-7----------------------------7-------------------------


-------------4-7-4--------------------------------------
-----------6-------6------------------------------------
---------4-----------4----------------------------------
-------6---------------6--------------------------------
---5-8-------------------8-5----------------------------
-7---------------------------7--------------------------
#9
If i were you i would take this quest as an excuse to learn my arpeggios, my neck and some theory.You wont learn the neck if you think of them as patterns.Just learn your major and minor arpeggios -knowing (at least) where the root is at all times- and you ll have more patterns that you can handle .

Do it like this: take a family(example: minor arpeggios) and find those who have the root on the second string.Learn and play them,then those who have the root on the third string.Learn and play them,then 4th 5th 6th until you can play a minor arpeggio in all or at least many positions over the neck.Still dont learn them as shapes but more in the terms of identifying where the root,flat third, fifth(intervals of the minor arp) lie on the fretboard.

That way not only you learn your intervals and arpeggios but you also strenghten your knowledge in all areas cause it ll help you connecting and recognizing chords and scales easier and it ll also be easier to use that knowledge to learn more.For example if you learned the minor arpeggios and their construction you ll understand that you ll need only one more note( the flat seventh) to make minor seventh patterns also etc etc etc.Learn things from the ground up,its easier and faster in the long run, plus a good source to find sweeping arp shapes is Frank Gambales Speed Picking DVD .I think its even on youtube.