#1
So, I have a Line 6 amp I got from the Laguna Ultimate Rock Pack a few years back, and haters gonna hate, but I really like it. Anywho, a couple weeks back it stopped working, I'd turn it on, and nothing, so I took it to my electrician friend and he took the switch out, the turned it on without a switch (With some fancy electric voodoo), he told me the switch was the problem, and I'd need a new one.

Problem is, I'm not really sure where I'd acquire such an item, I briefly looked on ebay, and any switches I found there weren't right (They had too many... Prong things)

Anyways, any idea of where I could pick up a power switch for this amp? Thanks in advance, and sorry for the vagueness.
Last edited by SocksAndTrees at Oct 9, 2013,
#2
You electrician friend will be able to get an equivalent for you. Alternatively, take the original switch to an electronics shop and they will hook you up with the correct replacement. Don't get hung up on it looking identical. Correct rating and fit in your chassis is the important stuff. Too many prong thingys is also not an issue. You can substitute DPST for SPST (dual pole, single throw for single pole, single throw, which is what you probably have). You just won't end up using the full capability of a DP switch. No problem.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#3
If it's a non-standard type of switch (which is probable) you may need to get one from Line 6. Drop them an email and they will tell you where you can source one.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#4
Quote by Vulcan
You electrician friend will be able to get an equivalent for you. Alternatively, take the original switch to an electronics shop and they will hook you up with the correct replacement. Don't get hung up on it looking identical. Correct rating and fit in your chassis is the important stuff. Too many prong thingys is also not an issue. You can substitute DPST for SPST (dual pole, single throw for single pole, single throw, which is what you probably have). You just won't end up using the full capability of a DP switch. No problem.

So, say I buy some of the ones I saw. The one I have currently has two prongs, looking like an outlet plug, but it's okay if I buy ones that have more? Tell it to me like I'm 2. Or maybe 3, today I feel smart.
#5
Quote by SocksAndTrees
So, say I buy some of the ones I saw. The one I have currently has two prongs, looking like an outlet plug, but it's okay if I buy ones that have more? Tell it to me like I'm 2. Or maybe 3, today I feel smart.

3 prongs in a single line indicates single pole, dual throw (SPDT). It has the capability of doing more than on/off. It may have a center position as well as up/down. 2 rows of 3 contacts (6 total) is a dual pole, double throw switch (DPDT). It can deal with more than 1 circuit, or do phase reversal, and more than likely has a center off position as well as up/down. You can use either of them, but you would need to know how to wire them to do what you want. Best to avoid if you don't know.

A single pair of contacts is a simple, on/off, single pole, single throw switch (SPST). This is probably what you have. All you can do wrong is install it upside down so that up is off, and down is on. 2 rows of 2 contacts is a dual pole, single throw (DPST) switch. If you use one of these, you would only use one pair of vertically aligned contacts. This switch can activate more than one separate circuit.

The current and voltage rating should be printed on your switch. Do not get one with a lower rating. You also need to make sure the dimensions of your replacement are such that no interference with other things around it will occur when mounted, and such that you will not need to drill a bigger hole, or it cannot be properly secured in the existing hole (too small).

However, you may want to take the advice of contacting the amp manufacturer first. It's the simplest step and guarantees a proper replacement.

It's an oddly difficult topic to find a decent reference online. Try this, P7 and 8 in the contents on the top right link box;

http://www.engineersgarage.com/articles/switch-types-structure?page=7
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
Last edited by Vulcan at Oct 10, 2013,
#6
Aren't they PCB mounted? I'd be checking that a different switch was physically able to be mounted in there. I'd lay money that you'll need the actual one that they came with. Some photos would be useful.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Oct 10, 2013,