#1
Im sixteen, and I play guitar. I have been thinking about becoming a recording engineer, but I dont know what the process is. should I go to college or a trade school? or should I just look for an internship somewhere?
#2
They do have college courses that allow you to do that. Music production courses are what you're looking for.
#3
Right now I'm going to school for it.

It's pretty damn awesome.
Quote by Joshua Garcia
my chemical romance are a bunch of homos making love to a mic and you like that cuz your a huge gay wad. You should feel pathetic for being such a gaywad you gay mcr loving gaywad olllol.
#4
I go to McNally Smith College of Music in Saint Paul Minnesota. I'm studying a Bachelor's in Music Production.

You could definitely go to a place like MSCM or Berklee. Keep in mind the market for engineer's is small and shrinking constantly. It's something you should get into only if you're 100% serious about it, because college obviously isn't cheap. Many people recommend just getting an internship and learning on your own, seeing that much in the music industry doesn't require a degree. I find McNally to be very valuable to my learning and there's a lot of connections to be made.

A huge part about a music school for production is making connections. That's a gigantic part. It's hard to get jobs without experience. Go learn stuff on your own before jumping into a school or whatever, there's piles to be learned online. Get an interface and Pro Tools and a cheap condenser mic and give it a go. Good luck!
#5
Don't narrow it up to only being a recording engineer. Don't know about the states but here in Finland the first year is just about sound engineering (both live and studio). Then you can choose whether or not you want to study live or studio. And honestly, when I first started school I was damn sure I'd want to be a recording engineer, but in the end I liked working live more. So now I'm able to do both, but prefer live.

Edit: As said, the recording industry is going down, which means the live part should go up to compensate for the lack in record sales, so you'd certainly find it easier to find work if you can do both.
Quote by Anthropocentric
Your balls. You lost the right to them. Hand them over.


Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
What kind of person needs to have a Flying V shoved up their vagina?



Join The 7-String Legion! Now!
Last edited by henrihell at Oct 11, 2013,
#6
Be social as **** and make connections. You honestly never know who you will end up bumping to later in life
#7
I'm on a course that could get me into it if I wanted. I'd recommend going to Uni to study production, but not so much for the degree or even really the learning. Frankly you can learn it all yourself through practice if you have enough spare time - but being on a degree makes you have the time for it which is nice. It's the making contacts that's important. In all walks of life, but especially in the recording business, it's who you know.
#8
There's pretty much two paths:

- Work in a studio as the tea boy and work your way up the ladder over the years
- Get a qualification/degree and skip the first bit of the process

I'm currently in my final year studying the Tonmeister course at Surrey uni. The best thing about the course is that they have a ton of contacts! If you choose a degree or college, make sure they are known in the industry and have contacts for you!
#9
Quote by willT08
I'm on a course that could get me into it if I wanted. I'd recommend going to Uni to study production, but not so much for the degree or even really the learning. Frankly you can learn it all yourself through practice if you have enough spare time - but being on a degree makes you have the time for it which is nice. It's the making contacts that's important. In all walks of life, but especially in the recording business, it's who you know.

This but I don't care about the contacts either because who fucking cares about getting a job in music.
#10
You have so much time to get to know the process. My advice is record as much of your playing as possible, record it in different ways, and develop a penchant for tinkering with technology. Build a network of friends/musicians and share your work as a recording enthusiast.
We're all alright!
#11
My advice is do a less specific course first, which explores multiple areas. Then you can decide what you want to do.

I did a degree in Music and Sound Technology, and learned what parts I liked and didn't like. I am now on a Masters in Music Engineering and Production.

You will likely change your mind on what you want to do, so don't specialise too much too early.
#12
Quote by Lastsongonearth
Im sixteen, and I play guitar. I have been thinking about becoming a recording engineer, but I dont know what the process is. should I go to college or a trade school? or should I just look for an internship somewhere?
Oh look, it's me from four years ago.


Simply put: DON'T. There's no demand for it, you won't have a job, chances of becoming a successful engineer are about as much as becoming a successful musician.

I had the same fantasy as you when I was 16, and thankfully I was talked out of it. I'm now working towards a CS major, with music on the backburner. As it should be. Any music writing, recording, or production is done purely for fun.

As you grow older you'll understand. It'll take a while to lose the whole "I wanna be famous in the music industry" ego but you'll get there.
#13
Quote by Ian_the_fox
Oh look, it's me from four years ago.


Simply put: DON'T. There's no demand for it, you won't have a job, chances of becoming a successful engineer are about as much as becoming a successful musician.

I had the same fantasy as you when I was 16, and thankfully I was talked out of it. I'm now working towards a CS major, with music on the backburner. As it should be. Any music writing, recording, or production is done purely for fun.

As you grow older you'll understand. It'll take a while to lose the whole "I wanna be famous in the music industry" ego but you'll get there.


Unlike you some people have talent and people skills and so can get jobs.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#14
If it's something you enjoy/think you'll enjoy, go for it! Just be aware it's a very tough industry to get in to, and as everyone else said, it's all about contacts. I have a 1st class degree in Audio Engineering and have not found any work since graduating almost a year ago. In this industry, as in most others, it's all about experience, contacts and persistence. Also, make sure not to limit yourself to being just a recording engineer. For example, as i look for studio/live work i also have a part-time job and am an app developer; you should always have other skills to fall back on in case it doesn't work out.


To answer your question, an internship in a professional studio would be far better than doing a course if you're lucky to come across one. If not, then a course is your best bet. Good luck!
#15
Quote by skater5thg
I go to McNally Smith College of Music in Saint Paul Minnesota. I'm studying a Bachelor's in Music Production.

You could definitely go to a place like MSCM or Berklee. Keep in mind the market for engineer's is small and shrinking constantly. It's something you should get into only if you're 100% serious about it, because college obviously isn't cheap. Many people recommend just getting an internship and learning on your own, seeing that much in the music industry doesn't require a degree. I find McNally to be very valuable to my learning and there's a lot of connections to be made.

A huge part about a music school for production is making connections. That's a gigantic part. It's hard to get jobs without experience. Go learn stuff on your own before jumping into a school or whatever, there's piles to be learned online. Get an interface and Pro Tools and a cheap condenser mic and give it a go. Good luck!

I have recorded a couple tracks at Mcnally.
#16
OP, lurk in the Recording subforum. Try and record yourself a few times first and get the jist of it before going in there asking questions, but I learn plenty from
Rotten Playground
Listen to me and Jameh muck about on a podcast
as if you have anything better to do.


Quote by Reverend_Taco
Grass stains on my dicks

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Pfft. Gay? Nah, gay is the manliest sex that exists.
#17
Thanks everyone for the advice. I think I my first choice would be to study at a university, and if I cant for whatever reason then I would look for an internship. Im trying to get more experience. Im working with a sound mixer for the school plays, and I plan to get stuff to start a mini-home recording studio.
for colleges, I'd definitely prefer to stay in california. can anyone recomend a decent colleges for music production?