#1
I want to learn some more scales to make solos out of since I only know two, but I want to mostly avoid the formulaic ones and go for something capable of adding some real emotional impact to a song. Can someone pick out say 2 or 3 scales that are used in some of the below solos to learn? No need to post the tabs I can look them up myself, just need the scale names.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JyZWZ2UGnC4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfCjaIzjCTM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d25SOtP1e08

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kT1DbpLf0l4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xbwat4eXN8

Cheers.
Last edited by robo37 at Oct 13, 2013,
#2
Learning scales is not what's going to help you make solos. The more scales you know is not going to help you compose better. For most rock and metal music, the only things you need to know are the pentatonic scale, major scale and minor scale. (And maybe harmonic minor)

It's not about the scale, it's how you use it. If you analyze solos you like you would get the information you need to know why these solos have such "emotional impact". Look at the chords, what notes are being played over that chord, how do they relate to that chord etc. Replicate that in different keys and train your ears.

Cheers.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
Quote by Sickz
Learning scales is not what's going to help you make solos. The more scales you know is not going to help you compose better. For most rock and metal music, the only things you need to know are the pentatonic scale, major scale and minor scale. (And maybe harmonic minor)

It's not about the scale, it's how you use it. If you analyze solos you like you would get the information you need to know why these solos have such "emotional impact". Look at the chords, what notes are being played over that chord, how do they relate to that chord etc. Replicate that in different keys and train your ears.

Cheers.


I agree tbh, but still I only know 2 scales at the present and even those are from a long time ago so my memory of them is a little fuzzy, and I can't remember what they're called either. It would certainly help to know a few more.
#4
Well, then my advice is to check out the pentatonic major scale, pentatonic minor scale, the major scale and the minor scale.

But i advice you, DON'T just practice the scale shapes. Learn theory alongside them. I have met enough guitar players that can play through a scale at 180 bpm, but when i ask them to play all the 7th chords from A major, they can't do it. Or if i ask them to solo over something that ain't a static em vamp, like a bossa or something.

I recommend you to check out the site "Musictheory.net" and study some theory at the same time. Don't get put off by the fact that you have to learn to read notation, notation is a great way to visualize theoretical concepts and to "show" music theory. It will help you understand scales and keys as well.

So that is my advice. Major scale, minor scale and the pentatonic scales. Alongside some basic theory. Strive for understanding why things work, not just accepting that it does.

Or like the great guthrie govan would say:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OkaqfgSqtHg

However, ignore these "modes" he is talking about. You won't need them for a long time, if at all. Focus on the ones i've mentioned.

Hope that helps. Good luck.
Cheers.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at Oct 13, 2013,
#5
Many thanks, I'll be sure to check them out.

I am much more interested in the creative side of song writing than the formulaic so you're approach should be best.