#1
So I was watching one of the videos that A Day To Remember put together like a studio update thing and if you skip some of the *ahem* comedy bullshit they talk about how their producer will program the drums, then the drummer comes in to "track the drums for real to add his own personal flare to the songs."

I was wondering, is this just a method that bands use in order to track the guitars first and have a decent rhythm to play along with instead of just a click track? Or will the pre-programmed drums stay in the final master as well as the real drum track, maybe to add a greater "oomph" to the drums?

Seems like a lot of time and effort for the producer if it's the first of these, I'm interested to know if this is a process that a lot of bands go through.

Thanks!

Here's the link. Watch from about 1:55 to 3:15

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPLjttjK3-E
#2
Look from 1:30 onwards, what they're doing is they're using programmed drums to help write the songs so that while they're writing and doing rough tracks there's no need to set up a full drum kit and recording gear, they can just change the MIDI drum track until they're happy with it.
#3
Yeah that's what i thought. Then the actual song would have only the real drums on it?
#4
^Pretty much. Its a somewhat common studio technique nowadays. I know Angels & Airwaves did that on their first album. They used midi drums in the home studio, recorded most of the other parts then tracked the drums in the Foo Fighters studio.
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#5
Though I can definitely see the benefit it just seems like long/tedious work for the producer to have to go through that!
#6
Quote by fhamilton2
Though I can definitely see the benefit it just seems like long/tedious work for the producer to have to go through that!

The producer doesn't usually do it. What happens is that the bands writes out their songs beforehand in Guitar Pro, giving them a good picture of what they'll sound like. Then, once they send the producer copies of their GP file, they can plug the drum track into a drum machine, by exporting the whole thing to MIDI.
#7
Quote by fhamilton2
Though I can definitely see the benefit it just seems like long/tedious work for the producer to have to go through that!


It's not as long and tedious as you think, a well-trained drummer programmer can bang out a workable drum MIDI (for a demo) in and hour or two.

Loop libraries help considerably with this process.
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#8
.... and sometimes those samples might be mixed in to support the sound of the live acoustic drums.

I don't know how many bands actually score things out in Guitar Pro, TBH.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

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#9
Quote by axemanchris
.... and sometimes those samples might be mixed in to support the sound of the live acoustic drums.

CT


Yeah I was wondering if bands who use this technique would include the samples. I can just imagine some drummers making an outcry about using samples behind their own drums on the finished record.
#10
I make a rough sketch/demo of songs with sampled drums. When it comes to recording the final version I start from scratch and play the acoustic drum kit to a click, the sampled drums is not in the final version, it's just there for me to compose and build ideas on. Then I add bass, guitars vocals etc. I'm sure there are better ways to go about it but at the moment it's what works for me.